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9 Bumps

Mental Illness

It almost seems that what happened in AZ has only reinforced the negative stigma of those who have mental health issues.
I think that we need to stop this decline. We need to use this issue to raise more awareness--a postive awareness--for mental health issues.
We need to reinforce the idea that it is OK to seek help. It is OK to let others know of your disorder. It is ok to use medications for your conditions.
Not all people with mental health issues are criminals--Not all criminals have mental health issues.

Answer Question
 
layh41407

Asked by layh41407 at 10:47 PM on Jan. 10, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 36 (79,415 Credits)
Answers (20)
  • You are so right!!!! Lift the stigma, get people to understand that a mental illness is just that..an ILLNESS and it should be covered like an illness such as cancer, heart disease, etc.
    tyfry7496

    Answer by tyfry7496 at 10:52 PM on Jan. 10, 2011

  • I think the negativity surrounding this is the fact that it was pretty evident that this guy had mental health issues and that no one did anything about it. Just like the Virginia Tech shooter, it was VERY obvious that he was severely unstable. Teachers read his papers, saw drawings, internet posts, etc. etc. and no one felt that it deserved any attention or that it was serious enough. It was just overlooked and look what happened. I agree with you that we need to raise awareness, but that we also need to be aware ourselves and if we see a person that is mentally unstable and seems to be capable of hurting himself or others, we need to contact help before help HAS to be contacted.
    Ash9724

    Answer by Ash9724 at 10:54 PM on Jan. 10, 2011

  • yes it is ok to ask for help for mental illness. speaking as someone who is suffering with it i wish that people would understand that not all people with mental issues are gonna go crazy and hurt people. i never wanted to hurt anyone esle i just didnt want to be alive anymore. but i have seen the light and now im on meds an doing much better. thank you so much
    knagsmom

    Answer by knagsmom at 10:57 PM on Jan. 10, 2011

  • The problem is convincing a person who has a sick mind or a disconnection in their processing system that they ARE NOT well and need treatment. If your reasoning and logic center is broken, it is hard to be reasoned with. Many mentally ill people do not believe that they are ill, instead they think everyone ELSE has problems. Many do not WANT help, which drives family members and support systems away, especially if the patient is an adult. Mental illness is as tough on families as it is on the affected.

    Sisteract

    Answer by Sisteract at 11:08 PM on Jan. 10, 2011

  • I worked direct care in crisis mental health for almost a decade. I met some pretty awesome people. One of my favorites was one who, 15 years ago had stabbed his case worker. He's a different guy, now. No saint, still benefits from meds and therapy, but you'll have that. Where we worked we didn't have security officers, weapons, or any thing else to keep us safe. Occasionally, we wish we did, but that was actually quite rare. Of all the thousands of people with mental illnesses that I worked with over the years, there were really less than ten that I ever felt unsafe with. Most of them I felt quite safe with, no different than in general population.
    Airamana

    Answer by Airamana at 11:12 PM on Jan. 10, 2011

  • Mental illness is definitely tough. On everyone. But I would hate for people to equate the difficulties of mental illness in general with danger to others in general. For instance, most people suffering with schizophrenia do not hear voices telling them to hurt others. Usually those voices are telling them negative things about themselves, or telling them to hurt themselves. Of the few that have command hallucinations to hurt others, the vast majority of them will end up hurting themselves instead of others. And a lot of people diagnosed with schizophrenia don't even hear voices. On top of that, there are so many other kind of mental illnesses that are not represented or misrepresented in the media. So little understanding in general...
    Airamana

    Answer by Airamana at 11:21 PM on Jan. 10, 2011

  • what Sisteract said.

    charlotsomtimes

    Answer by charlotsomtimes at 12:37 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • I agree with you 100%. Criminals don't always have mental issues. All people with mental issues aren't criminals. What they are trying to do is stereotype people, without finding out the truth. People that make all these assumptions are A******S. These people who do have mental problems are entitled to getting the help they need and to be able to function in the real world. What's so wrong with that?
    amessageofhope

    Answer by amessageofhope at 12:55 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • The problem is convincing a person who has a sick mind or a disconnection in their processing system that they ARE NOT well and need treatment. If your reasoning and logic center is broken, it is hard to be reasoned with. Many mentally ill people do not believe that they are ill, instead they think everyone ELSE has problems. Many do not WANT help, which drives family members and support systems away, especially if the patient is an adult. Mental illness is as tough on families as it is on the affected.

    ***
    This describes my mother and our non-existent relationship to a T!! It's sad, but you cannot FORCE people to address their issues and seek a consistent degree of help. I've seen those dependent on medication become convinced that the medication is making/keeping them ill, and so they stop taking it, and then, they go off....way off!
    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 7:20 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • It is ok your the person to seek help, but the public, teachers, employers, or friends can't insist on help. The Privacy Act has tied hands so tight that employers and teachers have to be very careful how they report people they suspect are having mental illness issues. The more that comes out about this shooter, the more we see there were warning signs, but no one could force this man to seek treatment. So, what is the solution? I have nothing.
    jesse123456

    Answer by jesse123456 at 8:23 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

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