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Education

What does a child need to know prior to going into Kindergarten now? I might be going back to school full time (oddly enough to get my teaching credentials) which will mean that I will be at home with my son enough for him not to need daycare/preschool anymore. We can't afford it either with me not working...I just want to make sure I don't set my son back by doing so. So, what do I need to make sure he knows really well before starting Kindergarten?

 
TitusMom7

Asked by TitusMom7 at 1:24 AM on Jan. 11, 2011 in Preschoolers (3-4)

Level 18 (5,459 Credits)
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Answers (7)
  • For my son's private school, he was tested before going to kindergarten. He needed to know how write and spell his whole name, recognize/write numbers 1-100, recognize/ write all letters upper and lower case, social skills, sit quietly for 20 minutes, pattern, sequence, follow a routine, tie his shoes, take himself to the bathroom and do his business on his own, know the planets/recognize them, colors, shapes, count to 100, count by 10's, read simple words and sentences, know words that rhyme, sounds of letters, sounding out words, etc.  Of course, his school is the best school in our area to attend and most students do not pass the test to get in. My son is also gifted so these things he caught on quickly.  He went to preschool but for him it was socialization. B/c I worked with him at home in addition to preschool.  

    Mom2Just1

    Answer by Mom2Just1 at 6:59 PM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • Linda,
    This may be true where you live, but not in many of the areas of the country. Now kids know much more. 50 to 100 sight words. They can sound out other words. They are computer literate. Social skills and following a group activity. Being able to interact with a group and listen when appropriate.
    Many states have funded programs for the children that cannot afford to attend preschool.
    It is possible to do this for your child at home. Depending on your school system. Over 90 percent of the kindergarteners in our elementary have attended private preschool. Just stay on top of things and involve your child in group activities so he stays on top of things.
    There may be a low cost or free preschool at your college. Check it out
    tootoobusy

    Answer by tootoobusy at 2:22 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • If your kid has been watching Sesame Street and going with you to grocery stores, visits to friends and playground outings, he'll be ahead of about 80% of his class.
    LindaClement

    Answer by LindaClement at 1:25 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • He is actually REALLY REALLY smart, which is why I am so concerned about pulling him out of his daycare. He has learned a lot in being there, but we just can't afford it. :(

    He knows things that most adults are floored to hear a two year old knows.
    TitusMom7

    Comment by TitusMom7 (original poster) at 1:26 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • Counting to 30 and being able to identify the numbers, saying ABCs and being able to identify both upper and lower case, dressing themselves,potty trained, of course, tyeing their own shoelaces, this is all I can remember.
    Aquarius80

    Answer by Aquarius80 at 1:27 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • My son is in a private preschool now. On a tour of our local public school the pricipal told me the expectation for incoming kids in k-5. They need to know and recognize the numbers 1 - 30. Although he said most can do up to 100. They need to know and recognize all letters in the alphabet. And they need to be already reading simple sentences. That is the fund of knowledge required before your child enters school. At least that is the expectation in my local public school.
    frogdawg

    Answer by frogdawg at 8:31 AM on Jan. 11, 2011

  • Knows full name, can print name, knows parents names, can count to at least 25, knows the ABC's and can print most of them, colors, shapes
    L0vingMy3Girls

    Answer by L0vingMy3Girls at 11:01 AM on Jan. 11, 2011