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23 Bumps

1 school, 90 pregnancies in just this school year

Not sure if this will go directly to the right video - if it doesn't it should be a box you can click below the main video

http://video.ap.org/?f=1139986&pid=Uh1lAGtZw7WmLPz1k1xtmKl5EyV27Lm0

I know our local high schools have daycares, but they wouldn't be even remotely big enough to handle that kind of demand.  Would yours? I don't know if the school in this story even offers those kinds of things (I know in some parts of the country they force you out of school or put you in "alternative" rather than let you stay) - but should they offer it?  Should they be prepared to handle that kind of demand?  One more - how do you fix it - sex ed doesn't work, teaching abstinence doesn't work - in all the questions asked before about sex ed, you're hard pressed to find anyone who'll say they'd never heard of either abstinence or a condom (or both) before they choose to have unprotected sex anyway.  How do you teach kids they aren't invincible and parenting isn't like playing with dolls?

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 1:57 PM on Jan. 14, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 51 (421,172 Credits)
Answers (54)
  • horrifying. I would hope the district would be fined or something..... gross. bad parenting, bad teaching. I am not so sure I believe in daycares in highschools. It seems to glorify it, in my opinion. Makes OTHER non preg. girls think it's acceptable.
    hibbingmom

    Answer by hibbingmom at 2:02 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • i honestly feel that teen pregnancy is a the point where parents need to put their daughters on birth control when they start their periods. preaching abstinence clearly doesn't work. it's not an invitation to have sex it's protecting your daughter if she gets in that situation. enough is enough with all these children having children
    momofone725

    Answer by momofone725 at 2:03 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • Separate the boys from the girls. The pregnancy rate for my high school was zero. We were allowed talking permission our senior year, as we were supposed to at that point find a suitable husband to care for us. Yes. It's archaic. But split the little darlings up for the school day, and it's 8 hours less for them to flirt and get all riled up.

    By the way, if you've ever taken a wander over into the pregnancy portion of questions, you know that sex ed isn't all that effective. The "could I be pregnant if.... " questions are kind of horrifying.

    Penis in vagina? yes, you could be pregnant.
    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 2:04 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • the way i see it is kids feel they are invincible because the parents now days are always hoovering around their kid. now im talking that this all starts as little ones and it just escalates from there. kids have never been hurt by falling off their bikes or a swing. i feel they take this into their life later on and feel like nothing can hurt them because they havent learned what concequences are. because of this we end up with situations where kids are having babies or getting STDs. i fully think that sex ed does need to be taught and it should start at 4th grade and it should go into sex and how babies are made along with all the diseases. and also explain to them what their options are and how to protect themselves be it abstenece, condoms, whatever. but i also fully support giving condoms out to all jr high and high school kids. that is the only way to help prevent pregancies. and parents should get more involved as well.
    laura970

    Answer by laura970 at 2:05 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • i honestly feel that teen pregnancy is a the point where parents need to put their daughters on birth control when they start their periods. preaching abstinence clearly doesn't work. it's not an invitation to have sex it's protecting your daughter if she gets in that situation. enough is enough with all these children having children
    _____________

    I see your sentiment, but I'm totally against putting children on hormones.
    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 2:05 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • i honestly feel that teen pregnancy is a the point where parents need to put their daughters on birth control when they start their periods.

    That's not really a good option, either. A lot of women have adverse side effects to hormone-based birth control - sometimes they don't even realize that's what is going on with them until the damage is done and can't be undone. That's compounded for young girls who aren't used to their bodies to begin with, and have no way to know how they are supposed to feel. Not to mention, it does nothing to prevent diseases, and may make them even more likely to take risks in that respect.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 2:08 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • Lovinangels, I just can't tell you how happy I was to read your answer about separating them. I am not a prude, and I was as much an oversexed teenager as the next, but I am so in love with the idea of gender separation. I swear to you, by the time I was in high school, I was so tied up in the constant love/sex dramas all the time that I barely paid attention in class. This would have been sharply cut down on in an all-girl situation. I am very, very fortunate that I never got pregnant. I am totally for splitting up boys and girls, but people always look at me like I'm crazy when I suggest it.
    vicesix

    Answer by vicesix at 2:10 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • These girls who think that having a baby is all walks in the sunshine and sweetness, need to spend a week with a SAHM. THAT should be a mandatory class at the school. Have them change the dirty diapers, get up in the middle of the night for feedings,do all the laundry that goes with having a baby,and still trying to keep up with the housework. They might change their minds when they get a dose of reality.
    Bethsunshine

    Answer by Bethsunshine at 2:10 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • Knowing Frayser like I know Frayser, it's the norm. Not an area you want to live in let alone go to school there.
    GL to any government body working with that district on a NoBaby.org campaign.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 2:11 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

  • The problem (I feel) is that parents leave sex ed up to the schools way too much and don't enforce it at home. Aside from disiplining your children and telling them how to be good, functional people you also have to tell them that they have potential outside of highschool.

    When I was 16 I started having sex. I was late one month and told my mom. She bought me a test (it was negative) and was supportive. But I told her because I was scared- terrified. I had been raised to believe that I had potential to be anything I wanted. My mom explained to me after this that having a child would virtually ruin the life that I could have. I never had unprotected sex again until I was out of college and established in a career.
    meandrphoto

    Answer by meandrphoto at 2:18 PM on Jan. 14, 2011

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