Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Gardasil Causing Genital Wart Outbreaks

(NaturalNews) The Gardasil vaccine has been linked to 78 outbreaks of genital warts, according to an article in The Fiji Times entitled "Are our girls guinea pigs?" by Matelita Ragogo. That's right. In addition to all of the other adverse reactions to this controversial vaccine, children who receive it are subject to outbreaks of genital warts. Unfortunately, not too many doctors take the time to educate parents about some of these possible reactions prior to giving little girls this expensive jab.


Answer Question
 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 9:46 AM on Nov. 13, 2008 in Health

Answers (28)
  • cont
    Deaths, Miscarriages and Other Adverse Events
    While genital warts are certainly disgusting, parents who think that genital warts are the worst possible adverse reaction to the vaccine should think again. According to Ragogo, as of August 14th, including the 78 outbreaks of genital warts, there have been 9,748 adverse events reported as per Judicial Watch, a non-profit watchdog group. Judicial Watch also reports that there have been 21 deaths, not including the deaths (by miscarriage) of 10 unborn babies.
    Vaccine No Guarantee Against Cell Abnormalities

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:47 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • cont
    "Hundreds of thousands of women who are vaccinated with Gardasil and get yearly pap testing will still get high-grade dysplasia (cell abnormalities)," Ragogo reports. It's not a cancer vaccine, as media hype may lead some people to believe. Ragogo also points out, "Gardasil has been shown to prevent precancerous lesions, but it has been impossible to ascertain whether it will actually prevent cancer because the testing period has been so short.
    "



    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:48 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • OMG that horrible!! i would get my daughter that anyway or myself
    chrstny88

    Answer by chrstny88 at 9:48 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • cont
    80% of Cervical Cancer Deaths Happen in Developing Countries
    According to an article by the King County Health Department in Washington, the "average age of women newly diagnosed with cervical cancer is between 50 and 55 years," and "risk of developing this cancer is very low among girls less than fifteen." How long will any possible immunity from a vaccine given to a tiny girl last? No one really knows. So, young girls are being vaccinated for potential problems that they may experience 40 years down the road, if at all, at which time any possible immunity conferred from the vaccine may be long gone. Of course, according to an article by the World Health Organization (WHO), 80% of all cervical cancer deaths happen in developing countries, anyway.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:48 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • i ment WOULD NOT sry
    chrstny88

    Answer by chrstny88 at 9:49 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • cont

    Diets Low in Fruits And Vegetables up Cervical Cancer Risk

    The King County Health Department also points out that of the various risk factors for cervical cancer, many can be controlled. One risk factor for cervical cancer is HPV. (Hmmm… does this mean that girls who get the vaccine and develop genital warts are now actually increasing their risk for developing cervical cancer?) Ordinarily, getting HPV is not exactly a huge risk for little girls that aren't having sex. Other risk factors include smoking, HIV, race (African American, Latino, Vietnamese and Native American women are more likely to die from cervical cancer), reduced access to health care, and (possibly) the use of oral contraceptives. The article also states, "Diets low in fruits and vegetables are associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer and several other cancers.
    "
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:49 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • cont

    Could The Vaccine Cause Cancer, Genotoxicity or Infertility?

    Another concern about the HPV vaccine is that it hasn't even been evaluated for its potential to actually cause cancer. Nor has the vaccine been evaluated for the ability to cause genotoxicity (DNA damage). Moreover, it is also unknown as to whether or not this vaccine could possibly cause future infertility. For all of these reasons, and many others that have been previously reported, it would appear prudent for all parents to think twice before subjecting their children to this "mystery" jab.

    http://www. naturalnews. com/024774. html
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 9:49 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • Good job pharmaceutical companies, good job!
    Apr1l

    Answer by Apr1l at 9:51 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • Do you have any good points about this vaccine? Because if it were really this bad they would not have such a huge campaign for it! I'm sure there are risk, just like there are risks with everything, but I am sure the good out weight the bad!! My best friend basically has cervical cancer and she is only 25, she may never be able to have kids again. Just think if this would have been available five years ago, she might not be going though what she is going through now. I think you need to read all facts before posting something.
    AnnHenderson

    Answer by AnnHenderson at 9:53 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

  • my daughter is only 1 but if she were older i wouldn't have her vaccinated with gardasil anyway. ppl think dr's know best but it's the drug co that rely on dr's to promote their drugs. their have been no long term studies on most newer drugs, only short term. so when in fact they don't know what the long term effect could be, if it would really prevent cervical cancer anyway. I don't want to give my daughter an HPV vaccine for something she may or may not get.
    SMWOODS

    Answer by SMWOODS at 9:54 AM on Nov. 13, 2008

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.

Next question in Health
can you give a baby yoplat yogurt?

Next question overall (Relationships)
big deal?