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3 Bumps

"in desperate need of a more positive and accessible image"

Wondering exactly what qualifies as positive and accessible, if the concept of tolerance is considered a negative influence?


"Barna Group, a California-based research organization, conducted 5,000 interviews in 2010 and came up with six trends in modern-day Christianity in the United States. Their conclusion: ”the Christian Church is in desperate need of a more positive and accessible image.”

1. The Christian Church is becoming less theologically literate.
What used to be basic, universally-known truths about Christianity are now unknown mysteries to a large and growing share of Americans–especially young adults.

2. Christians are becoming more ingrown and less outreach-oriented.
Despite technological advances that make communications instant and far-reaching, Christians are becoming more spiritually isolated from non-Christians than was true a decade ago.

3. Growing numbers of people are less interested in spiritual principles and more desirous of learning pragmatic solutions for life.
When asked what matters most, teenagers prioritize education, career development, friendships, and travel. Faith is significant to them, but it takes a back seat to life accomplishments and is not necessarily perceived to affect their ability to achieve their dreams.

4. Among Christians, interest in participating in community action is escalating.
Largely driven by the passion and energy of young adults, Christians are more open to and more involved in community service activities than has been true in the recent past.

5. The postmodern insistence on tolerance is winning over the Christian Church.
Our biblical illiteracy and lack of spiritual confidence has caused Americans to avoid making discerning choices for fear of being labeled judgmental.

6. The influence of Christianity on culture and individual lives is largely invisible.
Christianity has arguably added more value to American culture than any other religion, philosophy, ideology or community. Yet, contemporary Americans are hard pressed to identify any specific value added."

Orlando Sentinel

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 11:28 AM on Jan. 18, 2011 in Religious Debate

Level 51 (421,172 Credits)
Answers (10)
  • 4) Among Christians, interest in participating in community action is escalating. 5) The postmodern insistence on tolerance is winning over the Christian Church.


    These are bad things? Hmm i always thought involvement with bettering the community and tolerance were POSITIVE aspects and were to be desired.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 11:32 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • I don't know if it's considering #4 a positive or negative, but it definitely sounds like #5 is considered a big no no.
    NotPanicking

    Comment by NotPanicking (original poster) at 11:33 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • I'm thinking the author of that article might have gotten a little confused on his Thesis and the points he was trying to make.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 11:35 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • 1 & 5 do hand in hand. they're the only points I sort of agree with. Yes we have become lazy and don't study the whys of what we believe and just repeat what our minsters, Priests, etc. tell us without finding the why ourselves. Look to this section everyday you'll see it. As far as being judgemental we do need to point out the wrongs of others. Society has made this to be judgemental. No, you're correcting misinformation, or misdeeds. Big difference from saying you're going to hell in a hand basket. Which we all should know that no one this earth could possibly tell that.
    oldermomof5

    Answer by oldermomof5 at 11:46 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • As far as tolerence goes. You do tolerate and love your children but not their actions at times.
    oldermomof5

    Answer by oldermomof5 at 11:48 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • I don't see tolerance as agreeing with others actions or words. More of a "I disagree with what you say but I'll defend your right to say it" type of thing. So it's more of recognizing that others have different beliefs and protecting their rights to not be persecuted for those beliefs. (You know like it states in the Constitution) Tolerance is not acceptance of other beliefs as true, it's recognition that people do believe differently and have a right to do so.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 11:52 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • #2 and #4 seem to contradict one another...? (or maybe it's just me.) And I may get some flack for this, but I totally agree with #5. Tolerance in and of itself is not necessarily a good thing or a bad thing. It's what you're tolerating that matters. And it is entirely possible to be too tolerant. There are times when we need to nut up and say "what you're doing isn't right", when it truly isn't right, and not hem and haw over hurting someone's feelings in the process.
    TikiWiki33

    Answer by TikiWiki33 at 11:57 AM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • There are times when we need to nut up and say "what you're doing isn't right", when it truly isn't right


    Well yeah if someone is doing drugs, drinking, sleeping around behind their spouse's back and telling others not to do the same (Obviously an extreme example). However there is a way to do it without necessarily condeming the person and acting as big of a hypocrite. Wrong way---You're going to hell for your sinful manners Right way- I'm concerned about your actions and the negative influence they have on you and those around you, I think we should look into getting you help and getting you healthy again. (Obviously an extreme example and I'm not trying to pick on any one faith with my example as clearly it does not restrict itself to one religion).

    For Christians however, it even states in the Bible to first approach them privately about their actions and helping them before going to others
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 12:06 PM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • #2 and #4 seem a bit contradictory to me. I disagree with #1. You can know the truth if you want to. All it takes is reading a Bible. People just want a way to justify their sinful lifestyles and when they can't find a way to do that in a Bible or in a church, they are quick to dismiss all of it as false.
    popzaroo

    Answer by popzaroo at 3:11 PM on Jan. 18, 2011

  • I agree with kristi..otherwise, the author lost my attention when he contradicted himself.
    dullscissors

    Answer by dullscissors at 3:35 PM on Jan. 18, 2011

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