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Violence in Egypt...Chaos or Strategy? What do you think?

Do you think the violence (especially on journalists in the area) is due to chaos or the government's strategic attempt to stay in power and keep the truth of the situation from the media? There have been many examples of people attempting to protest peacefully, and we know that it's very difficult to remain non-violent while being attacked.

Few people have done that well...Ghandi and MLK Jr are a couple people I have in mind. When people do manage to take a stand and change the world through non-violent means, it's quite an achievement IMO.


Even Anderson Cooper was saying the other day that when someone is beating you, your instinct is to fight back but that just makes the crowd more enraged, so you don't really want to do that in that situation. They found it was best to just take it and keep pushing forward to get out of the crowd and up to a safer place. Even if people start out with intentions of non-violent, peaceful protest, it's definitely very difficult to maintain non-violence if you're being attacked--as we've seen.




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A playbook for 'The Day of Departure'
By Laura Conaway
-
Fri Feb 4, 2011 9:28 AM EST

Rachel Maddow reviews the harassment of journalists in Egypt and points out the overt strategy by the Mubarak government to win the information war and demonize protestors to justify their violent suppression.

Early this morning, Rachel tweeted that this segment was worth watching. It starts with a list of journalists who've been harassed and threatened, attacked and arrested in Egypt this week, and it draws this connection:

Why are they being attacked? Because they need to be stopped. They need to be stopped from stating the obvious. They need to be stopped from showing what's happening and what they've been reporting since it started, which is that the violence was started by the government against its own people in a last ditch effort to stay in power.

The one hope for anti-Mubarak revolution is that they respond to their government's violence with nonviolence, that they counter any attacks with information and with peace. Right now in Cairo's Tahrir Square at this moment, that seems a fragile hope. Al Jazeera reports that a large and happy crowd of demonstrators have gathered, but that a couple hundred Mubarak supporters are collecting on a nearby bridge.

Whether the situation on this "Day of Departure" remains peaceful or plunges into bloodshed, remember that what you're seeing is strategy -- not chaos, no happenstance, but strategy. It's the Egyptian government's strategy for keeping President Hosni Mubarak in power versus the protesters' for getting him out.

A Playbook for the Day of Departure

 
pam19

Asked by pam19 at 10:17 AM on Feb. 4, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 30 (42,186 Credits)
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Answers (21)
  • I think the people want the media there, but Mubarak's hired thugs were given the go ahead on the violence, and they don't care who is in their way.
    SweetLuci

    Answer by SweetLuci at 10:42 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • It appears that it is the government that is inciting the violence against its own people, against US citizens and especially against the media. Mubarak, I think, has no intentions of leaving office, even though he said he would step down in September after the "elections", but if he is being held accountable by worldwide media coverage, it will be hard for him to manoeuvre his retention of power. It's chaotic right now, for certain, but I think it was planned by Mubarak and his administration.  Peaceful demonstrations being filmed and streamed worldwide shows a thoughtful crowd who really want change in their country.  By turning it into complete chaos, a distraction is provided, and rather than seeing peaceful people demanding human rights, the world sees a frightening show of disorder, being put back to order by Mubarak. . .

    jsbenkert

    Answer by jsbenkert at 11:42 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • Do you think the violence (especially on journalists in the area) is due to chaos or the government's strategic attempt to stay in power and keep the truth of the situation from the media?
    ___________________________
    Yes! Mubarack has been trying to control the media since the beginning, and has been trying to control it for the past 30 years. I can't believe this is a question in anyones mind.
    stacymomof2

    Answer by stacymomof2 at 11:07 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • It's Mubarak that is encouraging and perhaps even ordering the beatings.
    __________________
    He is paying people to do this. The protesters have caught people and checked IDs. People are admitting to being paid and encouraged. Some people are doing it for the equivalent of $40 American. Sad!
    stacymomof2

    Answer by stacymomof2 at 3:36 PM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • It is not the government.
    ______________________
    Who told you that? There is no support for this statement. It IS the government that has escalated the violence, and has tried to kick out the media. My God, why not check with the people it happened to? Check with the BBC, Al Jazeera, numerous Us stations. Your statement is completely ridiculous.
    stacymomof2

    Answer by stacymomof2 at 11:09 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • jsbenkert, that is what I am seeing also. It's Mubarak that is encouraging and perhaps even ordering the beatings. Why else is he forbidding cameras and the internet? He doesn't want for us to see what he's doing.
    parrishsky

    Answer by parrishsky at 3:14 PM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • I just wish things would settle down.
    Misteh

    Answer by Misteh at 10:18 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  •  

    I think the people want the media there, but Mubarak's hired thugs were given the go ahead on the violence, and they don't care who is in their way.

    yup

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 10:50 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • Chaos. I don't think any strategy if there was one, is working. It's total chaos now
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 10:52 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

  • jsbenkert, you got it exactly.
    stacymomof2

    Answer by stacymomof2 at 11:48 AM on Feb. 4, 2011

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