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Is the teacher being difficult or am I? long story.

Ok little background. My DD is in 1st grade. I noticed at the first of the school year she was having some difficulty reading and I expressed my concerns to the teacher. Well, the teacher told me that she was a little immature but she should catch up she was not worried about it. So I said ok and let it go. Then about the end of Sept. I again expressed concerns regarding her difficulty reading (keep in mind that I am helping her EVERY afternoon) and sugessted that maybe she needed a tutor.

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monica1325

Asked by monica1325 at 11:34 AM on Nov. 17, 2008 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Level 1 (0 Credits)
Answers (19)
  • Continued....Again the teacher says she thought my DD was more immature than the other students in her class and that she (DD) just needed more time. Ok, I get the report card for the 2nd 6 weeks last week and there was a SIGNIFICANT drop in my DD's grades in reading, spelling and language arts. I'm not talking about 5-6 points I mean 11 in one subject and 13 in the other two.
    monica1325

    Answer by monica1325 at 11:35 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • continued...So I wrote the teacher a note and told her I would like to discuss DD's grades. Well, the teacher wrote me back and said quote"I don't know what it is about her grades you would like to discuss, but let me give you some advice. Work with her every day on her reading and spelling. Also after she finishes reading ask her questions. Then on language arts show her punctuation and let her know where they are supposed to go. I still think she is just immature." First of all, these are the exact things I have been doing since school started. Second of all I don't believe she should keep referring to my daughter as immature. She's 6 for goodness sakes. She acts like a 6 year old. Any thoughts?
    monica1325

    Answer by monica1325 at 11:35 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • I'm sorry your dealing with this, it's very difficult I know to work with some teachers.
    For one I would ask her specifically what she thinks makes her immature, what exactly she means b/c that is very vague. Once you have that info adress it.
    Next I would say try to figure out her learning style, maybe she is not doing well b/c the teacher and you are trying the mainstream teaching methods but she learns differently. The school should be able to test her (they do it here any way) good luck
    perksmom

    Answer by perksmom at 11:46 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • First off the teacher needs to quit calling your daughter immature! My son who is now in the 2nd grade had a really hard time learning to read, it scared the crap out of me! I took him to the Dr. and asked if he ad AD? the Dr. told me No although he is High Spirited he does not have any attention disorders. When the next year rolled around I decided to try a new exercise with him, to see just where the problem layed! When he got home from school I would have two books set aside one would be something I knew he would not be interested in the next would be about something he loved!
    Mica30

    Answer by Mica30 at 11:48 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • Her first and biggest mistake was not taking you seriously any time you've talked to her. Second, to say that she doesn't know why you want to discuss her grades is totally unprofessional. I would try to talk to her one more time and if you get the same results, I would go to the principal and if you still don't get anywhere, go to the school board. Your have the right to have your daughter tested if you think there's any kind of problem that compromises her education. And as far as her saying that your daughter is immature, where the hell does she get off saying that?

    LovingParent08

    Answer by LovingParent08 at 11:52 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • I agree and I too would be mad as hell. I went through something similar with my 10 year old ds when he was in second grade. He has ADHD and ODD and some days would be rougher than others but the whole time, his school, principal and teachers kept reassuring me that I had their support. Then the principal (of all people) sent me an email saying that he (my son) has had two rough days in a row and if I thought tomorrow would be rough also, she would appreciate if I keep him home! Needless to say, we switched schools the next year and he still has rough days, but everyone at his new school are much more willing to help and have! GL. Hope this helps some.
    LovingParent08

    Answer by LovingParent08 at 11:52 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • cont... First We would read the boring book I would ask questions and he could'nt answer, then I would read the good book and ask him questions and he answered perfectly! That told me the books that they were reading in class did not catch is intrest! Now he reads ubove his grade level! You should try that exercise and if it works inform the teacher, then call the school Pricipal and set up a meeting with the principal, the teacher, and yourself. Explain to the principal how you do not appreciate the teachers comments that your daughter is immature, and then tell them about the exercise and how it worked! That should fix the problem!
    Mica30

    Answer by Mica30 at 11:57 AM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • Groan. Teachers do a very wonderful thing. They teach. But they are not trained in learning difficulties and usually suspect things like poor parenting, "immaturity," or even diagnose when they are not qualified to offer medical opinions (ADHD). Save every document your child's teacher writes to you. Always try to communicate via e-mail and save those. When you meet her in person follow up with an e-mail, "we met (or spoke on the phone) and I just wanted to make sure I understoond your suggestions..." This way you have proof of what took place. Next, you have the right to ask that your child be evaluated by school psychologist for learning desrepencies. Such as when a child's ability to learn does not match what they are able to do. Then there may be some learning disabilites.
    frogdawg

    Answer by frogdawg at 12:01 PM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • cont..This is free and all schools across the country are required to evaluate when you put the request in writing. Put the time and date on your written request and put your specific concern on the letter. Ask them to evaluate her reading comprehension, language, and expressive and non verbal language abilities. Also, b/c your teacher expressed so much concern about her maturity level (let this come back to bite her in the ass) request they also test for emotional/behavioral issues related to her developement. This is where the teacher's own hand written responses come back to get her.
    frogdawg

    Answer by frogdawg at 12:05 PM on Nov. 17, 2008

  • cont..The school cannot legally deny your request. They are legally obligated to evaluate her. While it is no cost to you - it is expensive for them. Oh well. (thousands actually) They may ask you to wait and delay testing. Don't. I worked as a therapist in schools. If she has an issue then the sooner you know the better. The longer you wait the more difficult, if not impossible, it will be later. If you can afford outside independent evaluations - do so. While expensive, and the school does not use their evaluations (they only use the school's) - it will give you a better understanding of what is going on. Sometimes schools are not the best indicators of what a child needs when they do evaluations - money is a key issue for them. How to educate everyone with the least amount of money.
    frogdawg

    Answer by frogdawg at 12:09 PM on Nov. 17, 2008

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