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4 Bumps

5.Did you know?

Richard Loving was white; his wife, Mildred, was black. In 1958, they went to Washington, D.C. — where interracial marriage was legal — to get married. But when they returned home, they were arrested, jailed and banished from the state for 25 years for violating the state's Racial Integrity Act.To avoid jail, the Lovings agreed to leave Virginia and relocate to Washington. For five years, the Lovings lived in Washington, where Richard worked as a bricklayer. The couple had three children. Yet they longed to return home to their family and friends in Caroline County. That's when the couple contacted Bernard Cohen, a young attorney who was volunteering at the ACLU. They requested that Cohen ask the Caroline County judge to reconsider his decision."They were very simple people, who were not interested in winning any civil rights principle," Cohen, now retired, tells Michele Norris. They just were in love with one another and wanted the right to live together as husband and wife in Virginia, without any interference from officialdom. When I told Richard that this case was, in all likelihood, going to go to the Supreme Court of the United States, he became wide-eyed and his jaw dropped," Cohen recalls.Road to the High CourtCohen and another lawyer challenged the Lovings' conviction, but the original judge in the case upheld his decision. Judge Leon Bazile wrote: "Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, Malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents. ... The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix."As Cohen predicted, the case moved all the way up to the Supreme Court, where the young ACLU attorney made a vivid and personal argument:

"The Lovings have the right to go to sleep at night knowing that if should they not wake in the morning, their children would have the right to inherit from them. They have the right to be secure in knowing that, if they go to sleep and do not wake in the morning, that one of them, a survivor of them, has the right to Social Security benefits. All of these are denied to them, and they will not be denied to them if the whole anti-miscegenistic scheme of Virginia... [is] found unconstitutional."

Answer Question
 
emilysmom1966

Asked by emilysmom1966 at 7:03 AM on Feb. 10, 2011 in

Level 18 (6,228 Credits)
Answers (9)
  • The Lovings have the right to go to sleep at night knowing that if should they not wake in the morning, their children would have the right to inherit from them. They have the right to be secure in knowing that, if they go to sleep and do not wake in the morning, that one of them, a survivor of them, has the right to Social Security benefits. All of these are denied to them, and they will not be denied to them if the whole anti-miscegenistic scheme of Virginia... [is] found unconstitutional."
    After the ruling — now known as the "Loving Decision" — the family, which had already quietly moved back to Virginia, finally returned home to Caroline County.

    But their time together was cut short: Richard Loving died in a car crash in 1975. Mildred Loving, who never remarried, still lives in Caroline County in the house that Richard built. She politely refuses to give interviews.
    emilysmom1966

    Comment by emilysmom1966 (original poster) at 7:04 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • What a sad testament to the ignorance in our country at the time. Thank you for sharing this, I had no idea.
    Scuba

    Answer by Scuba at 7:30 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • LOVE IS THE BEGINNING OF ETERNITY
    GlitteribonMom

    Answer by GlitteribonMom at 7:32 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • Thanks for sharing this.
    Imortlmommy

    Answer by Imortlmommy at 7:37 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • I did know, I am greatful for their fight

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 8:38 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • Yes, I know.

    The attorney's arguement in favor of interracial marriage is also very powerful when thinking of homosexual marriage, imo.
    SuperChicken

    Answer by SuperChicken at 9:24 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  •  

    Yes, I know.

    The attorney's arguement in favor of interracial marriage is also very powerful when thinking of homosexual marriage, imo.

    Sure is

    sweet-a-kins

    Answer by sweet-a-kins at 9:37 AM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • The facts you're coming up with are fascinating. Thanks for sharing.
    tinamatt

    Answer by tinamatt at 3:33 PM on Feb. 10, 2011

  • no
    san78

    Answer by san78 at 5:04 AM on Feb. 14, 2011

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