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After reading the post referencing Thich Nhat Han, I thought I'd ask what people thought of the author Kahlil Jibran.

Kahlil Gibran was raised in a Catholic family in Lebanon, but was influenced by islamic cultures, and as an adult looked for ways to show unity of religious beliefs.

The passage below is from the book "The Prophet". This is a book I first read in 1997. I'd seen it on my mother's shelves as a kid, but never really looked at it till I was out of the house. I was doing a nanny job at the time, and was in the library looking for some reading material. I found the book, opened it to read a few passages, and ended up reading the whole book before I left the library. Subsequently, I bought the book because I liked it so much.


From pages 54-55:

And a man said, Speak to us of Self Knowledge.
And he answered saying:
Your hearts know in silence the secrets of the days and nights.
But your ears thirst for the sound of your heart's knowledge.
You would know in words that which you have always known in thought.
You would touch with your fingers the naked body of your dreams.

And it is well you should.
The hidden well-spring of your soul must needs rise and run murmuring to the sea;
And the treasure of your infinite depths would be revealed to your eyes.
But let there be no scales to weigh your unknown treasure;
And seek not the depths of your knoledge with staff or sounding line.
For self is a sea boundless and measureless.

Say not, "I have found the truth," but rather, "I have found a truth."
Say not, "I have found the path of the souul."
Say rather, "I have met the soul walking upon my path."
For the soul walks uponall paths.
The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.
The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals.

 
ladymomtraveler

Asked by ladymomtraveler at 6:58 AM on Feb. 13, 2011 in Religious Debate

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Answers (8)
  • First of all I love Kahlil Jibran! I particularly love this part:


    Say not, "I have found the truth," but rather, "I have found a truth."


    Say not, "I have found the path of the souul." Say rather, "I have met the soul walking upon my path."


     For the soul walks uponall paths. The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.


    The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals.

    sahmamax2

    Answer by sahmamax2 at 7:53 AM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.
    The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals

    I really like this concept. It is so true. As for the rest, I need to digest it first. Upon first impressions, I totally agree that self-knowledge is very important and can make the soul mesh with the body.
    LovemyQ

    Answer by LovemyQ at 7:54 AM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • I'm going to have to find that book now, lol. It sounds like something I would really enjoy (especially as a Christian with a deep admiration for the Islamic faith).

    I especially liked this part :
    "Say not, "I have found the truth," but rather, "I have found a truth."
    Say not, "I have found the path of the souul."
    Say rather, "I have met the soul walking upon my path."
    For the soul walks uponall paths.
    The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.
    The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals." :)
    bandgeek521

    Answer by bandgeek521 at 9:32 AM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • I haven't read it, but it sounds like something I would be interested it. I added it to my wish list. Thanks for the recommendation. My husband said his mom recommended it to him years ago, but he never got around to reading it. Maybe she has a copy I can borrow.

    I like the part about "Say not, "I have found the truth," but rather, "I have found a truth."

    I also like the part about "your hearts know in silence the secrets of secrets of the days and nights."

    Most of the time I approach reading any sacred texts as a means of finding the wisdom within. They don't really 'teach' us anything, but they help us recognize the peace, love, and wisdom that's already within ourselves and may help guide us to be more mindful and compassionate in our lives IF we LIVE it.
    pam19

    Answer by pam19 at 9:53 AM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • I love Kahlil Gibran. I had a friend read a passage from The Prophet about love and marriage at my wedding.  He is a wonderful poet and philosopher.  I found so many "favorite" passages, and the one you shared is among them.  In fact, the entire book is a favorite of mine.

    jsbenkert

    Answer by jsbenkert at 11:39 AM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • interesting!!! i havent read it tho
    san78

    Answer by san78 at 12:24 PM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • I ike Kahlil Gibran... actually, a verse from The Prophet was part of our wedding ceremony. I particularly like the last verse in the quote you cited... it reminds me of the Buddhist saying that there are a thousand doors to the Dharma (truth).
    Freela

    Answer by Freela at 11:39 PM on Feb. 13, 2011

  • It was really hard for me to choose a 'best answer' on this...I loved everyone's comments. :)
    ladymomtraveler

    Comment by ladymomtraveler (original poster) at 6:37 AM on Feb. 22, 2011

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