Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

3 Bumps

(RD) Agree or Disagree? Cautious 60 percent of teachers need to speak up about evolution

Cross-posted in P&CE

 

from: http://www.dailynebraskan.com/opinion/lysford-cautious-60-percent-of-teachers-need-to-speak-up-about-evolution-1.2476656?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Daily_Nebraskan&utm_campaign=Daily_Nebraskan_2011222212

Cautious 60 percent of teachers need to speak up about evolution

By Collin Lysford

Published: Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Updated: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 00:02

 

About five years ago the teaching of evolution in public schools came under fire in Kitzmiller v. Dover. A Dover Area School District policy demanded that intelligent design be taught as an alternative to evolution. The plaintiffs, parents of children in the school district, argued that intelligent design was nothing more than an alternate form of creationism, a religious view unfit for the classroom. In a district court, presided by the conservative, Republican judge John E. Jones III, it was the plaintiff who carried the day. To quote Judge Jones: "The overwhelming evidence at trial established that ID is a religious view, a mere re-labeling of creationism, and not a scientific theory."

Evolution has won the battle in the courtroom. Even now, though, five years after Kitzmiller v. Dover, it's still an issue of strong contention in our classrooms.

Science Magazine recently published a survey regarding the teaching of evolution in the United States. On the optimistic side, advocates of evolutionary biology – teachers who properly show evolution's role in tying together the disparate elements of biology – are up to 28 percent, as opposed to 13 percent who explicitly teach creationism. More worrisome, though, is the remainder. Between 59 and 60 percent profess to teaching "neither." That's right: more than half of our biology teachers are not taking a stand on the most important issue in biology. As the article accompanying the survey put it, they want to "avoid controversy."

 

more

 

Agree or Disagree?

 
MamaK88

Asked by MamaK88 at 11:39 AM on Feb. 22, 2011 in Religious Debate

Level 33 (62,090 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (12)
  • Sadly this helps to point out why our country is lagging further and further behind in the sciences.
    anng.atlanta

    Answer by anng.atlanta at 11:58 AM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • Millman - nothing in the Bible about electricity, computers, antibiotics, the periodic table, gravity, string theory, etc., either. Do we really want to stick to only what's in the Bible?

    Dr.Donna

    Answer by Dr.Donna at 12:34 PM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • sounds like there's a lot of things that aren't discussed in the schools anymore because of a attempt to avoid controversy.
    ItsMe89

    Answer by ItsMe89 at 11:42 AM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • Would it really work if we went back to that and the school got put in a LDS church? What if a synagogue was the only school? What about a pagan coven? Really how good do you think it works if it is not your faith being taught?

    Alanaplus3

    Answer by Alanaplus3 at 11:57 AM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • You get what you ask for as a society- when politics and over-active parents infringe on the classroom- teachers respond- keep your politics and personal vendettas out of the classroom and things will change-until then- we are all part of the problem or we are all part of the solution-
    soyousay

    Answer by soyousay at 11:59 AM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • To quote Judge Jones: "The overwhelming evidence at trial established that ID is a religious view, a mere re-labeling of creationism, and not a scientific theory."

    ----

    I agree with this ^, and I think we need to teach evolution in school. Creationism could be taught in a comparative religion course AS religion, but it's not based on science and should not be taught as fact or as scientific theory.
    pam19

    Answer by pam19 at 12:37 PM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • Everyone is so quick to sue nowadays. Nobody wants to be stuck in the crossfire. Why can't we just teach both?
    ImaginationMama

    Answer by ImaginationMama at 11:44 AM on Feb. 22, 2011

  • evolution's theories yes in Science...but in what grade?
    GlitteribonMom

    Answer by GlitteribonMom at 2:09 PM on Feb. 23, 2011

  • It's not a scientific theory so it should not be taught in public schools in a science class.
    sarchasmicangel

    Answer by sarchasmicangel at 12:13 AM on Feb. 23, 2011

  • I think they should open the class up for a healthy debate and let the kids practice expressing their own beliefs on Creation/Evolution.
    It certainly won't be the last of it.......
    deedee3849

    Answer by deedee3849 at 4:44 PM on Feb. 24, 2011

Next question in Religious Debate
Pagans...

Next question overall (Health)
Shotts

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN