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what you think about amendment 8 going to court?

SAN FRANCISCO – California's highest court agreed Wednesday to hear several legal challenges to the state's new ban on same-sex marriage but refused to allow gay couples to resume marrying before it rules.

The California Supreme Court accepted three lawsuits seeking to nullify Proposition 8, a voter-approved constitutional amendment that overruled the court's decision in May that legalized gay marriage.

All three cases claim the measure abridges the civil rights of a vulnerable minority group. They argue that voters alone did not have the authority to enact such a significant constitutional change.

 
Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:44 AM on Nov. 20, 2008 in Politics & Current Events

This question is closed.
Answers (22)
  • I don't understand why they put it up for a vote if they weren't willing to accept it.


    It shouldn't have been. Revising the constitution can't be done by ballot initiative, it takes a 2/3 vote of the legislature.

    autodidact

    Answer by autodidact at 3:59 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • I don't understand why they put it up for a vote if they weren't willing to accept it.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:50 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • All three cases claim the measure abridges the civil rights of a vulnerable minority group. They argue that voters alone did not have the authority to enact such a significant constitutional change.


    Thats what I have been saying a along!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 2:50 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • They can't change the vote. If that was the case then we all could go to court and say we didn't vote for Obama so let's overturn it. It violates our rights as minorities because he is black and we are white.
    Scorpio359

    Answer by Scorpio359 at 3:07 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • Scorpio359 that's ridiculous. passing a law is very different than voting for president. and yes the court can overturn a vote that violates civil rights.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:15 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • This should have never been put up to a vote
    pnwmom

    Answer by pnwmom at 3:17 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • love this
    Separate Is Never Equal: A Lesson in Civil Rights from the D.C. (Anti-) Prop 8 Rally
    Alright, I admit it. I am one of those ACLU staffers who works on national security issues and didn’t understand why, when the government is spying on innocent Americans or torturing people, I should focus on the rights of a few to marry, even if the issue affects some of my closest friends — or even me. Until election night. I had just returned from watching returns and was excited that it seemed that America had gotten over enough racial bias to elect a black man, who was born before the Civil Rights Act passed or the Voting Rights Act guaranteed the rights of African-Americans to vote, to the presidency.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:40 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • continues
    I opened my laptop to check the results of the California Proposition 8 Ballot Measure and felt like someone had punched me in the gut. I had thought that the U.S. had overcome so much prejudice in this election, but here was California, a supposed progressive bastion, voting to deny equal rights to a certain minority.

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:40 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • continues
    This past Saturday, I attended the D.C. (Anti-)Proposition 8 Rally (or, as we rally-ers un-affectionately called it, H8 — pronounced "hate") and was inspired by the various signs spanning the full spectrum of angles on marriage for same-sex couples. Signs proclaimed everything from "The Equal Rights of a Minority Should Not Be Put Up To a Vote of the Majority" to "Marriage is About Love Not Hate" and "H8 is Not a Family Value." High school kids marched alongside middle-aged couples (straight and gay), and one family brought signs that read "How Does Protecting Our Family Hurt Your Family?" From the marshals to the speakers to the marchers, a rainbow of faces and personalities matched the rainbow flags that some of the participants were carrying. Perhaps the sign that summed up the spirit of the day was the one that read "It’s about Love and Equality."

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:46 AM on Nov. 20, 2008

  • After the rally, I found an article by University of Pennsylvania Law Professor Kermit Roosevelt asking when a majority should have the power to take away a constitutional right granted by a court. He reminds us that nationally, a two-thirds — or a "super" — majority is required to amend the Constitution, unlike in California where a simple 52-47 vote outlawed gay marriage.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 3:47 AM on Nov. 20, 2008