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More union busting agenda, do you agree with this?

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A Republican state senator in Ohio who had expressed his disappointment in a bill that would restrict the bargaining rights of public workers has been replaced on a committee that is poised to approve the measure.

Senate leadership on Wednesday appointed Sen. Cliff Hite of Findlay to the panel to replace state Sen. Bill Seitz, a Cincinnati Republican. Hite supports the bill.

Commitee Chairman Kevin Bacon says it was done "due to vote count" on the panel, but would not comment further.

He says he has had the votes to get the bill approved and to the GOP-led Senate for a vote. The chamber could take up the measure as soon as Wednesday afternoon.

All four Democrats on the 12-person panel oppose the legislation.

Some 350,000 teachers, university professors, firefighters, police officers and other public workers would be affected by the legislation if it becomes law.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Another showdown on an Ohio bill to restrict the bargaining rights of public workers could come as early as Wednesday with a vote by a Republican-majority legislative committee whose chairman says he has the support to send the measure to the Senate.

Worker rights and collective bargaining have sparked debate in statehouses across the country, most notably in Wisconsin, where a scheduled vote on a similar bill prompted Democratic lawmakers to flee the state.

As GOP Sen. Shannon Jones unveiled her changes to the Ohio bill Tuesday, a daylong rally drew 8,500 protesters who chanted, brandished signs, and listened to musical acts and speakers.

Labor sympathizers also planned to gather Wednesday afternoon for a vigil, anticipating the Senate Insurance, Commerce and Labor Committee will approve the bill and send it to the full chamber. Republicans hold the majority in the 33-member Senate.

Republican Gov. John Kasich supports the effort. He said in a Fox television interview Tuesday that restricting collective bargaining would be part of a package he plans to present March 15 to address the state's $8 billion deficit, joblessness and poverty.

Democrats have opposed the measure. Senate Democratic Leader Capri Cafaro said the bill "turns collective bargaining into a one-sided conversation where management always gets the last word."

Some 350,000 teachers, university professors, firefighters, police officers and other public workers would be affected by the legislation if it becomes law. Some predicted the Republican-led campaign would backfire.

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 12:32 PM on Mar. 2, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (15)
  • sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 12:33 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Yes, I do.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 12:49 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Democrats have opposed the measure. Senate Democratic Leader Capri Cafaro said the bill "turns collective bargaining into a one-sided conversation where management always gets the last word."

    As opposed to the union always getting the last word?

    I don't think either the WI or the OH bills are aimed at busting unions, but more of reforming how and what can be bargained for and I am all for that. Let's face it, with public sector unions, and that is what we are talking about - not private sector ones, there is only so much money the state can give them. You can only raise taxes on the people so much before they start fleeing the state to more tax friendly states which only makes it worse. The people funding their (public union) jobs are taking pay cuts and paying for more benefits. Why should the unions not have to also?
    DSamuels

    Answer by DSamuels at 12:52 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Wisconsin, Ohio, and many other states who have this leg. 'on the table 'would~ in many ways treat state workers the same as Federal government Employees are treated.... Was Carter guilty of "union busting" when he signed the 1978 Federal Civil Service Act?

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 1:09 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  •  


    Wisconsin, Ohio, and many other states who have this leg. 'on the table 'would~ in many ways treat state workers the same as Federal government Employees are treated.... Was Carter guilty of "union busting" when he signed the 1978 Federal Civil Service Act?


     


    If I bring uo Bush (who's policies are still affecting us) I am told that is the PAST...now YOU are bring up the 70's?? I was 2 in 78...anyway, back to 2011



    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 1:15 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Sweet, I wonder if you know who said:

    "Government employees should realize that the process of collective bargaining, as usually understood, cannot be transplanted into the public service. It has its distinct and insurmountable limitations when applied to public personnel management. The very nature and purposes of Government make it impossible for administrative officials to represent fully or to bind the employer in mutual discussions with Government employee organizations. Particularly, I want to emphasize my conviction that militant tactics have no place in the functions of any organization of Government employees. A strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to prevent or obstruct the operations of Government until their demands are satisfied. Such action, looking toward the paralysis of Government by those who have sworn to support it, is unthinkable and intolerable."
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 1:53 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Face the FACTS, OP~The Federal Law is quite similar to what Ohio and Wisconsin want to do....
    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 1:54 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Too bad for all the tenured liberal Women's Studies professors who know more than everybody else on the planet.

    How the hell do you even get a job with that degree, Women's Studies?

    So stupid.



    mustbeGRACE

    Answer by mustbeGRACE at 2:06 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • Well he didn't kick the other guy off that sided with the Dems...... Could there be more to the story?
    Charis76

    Answer by Charis76 at 3:05 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

  • FDR said what you quoted anon. Sweetie poo will undoubtedly ignore it though.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 4:23 PM on Mar. 2, 2011

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