Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Scott Walker, are the people of WI with him or the unions?

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has caught a lot of flak for his proposal to strip public employee unions of most of their collective bargaining rights. He can add to that a new poll of likely Wisconsin voters from Rasmussen -- a pollster much maligned for its typically Republican-skewing results -- which finds public opinion firmly against him on the issue.

A majority of those polled said they sided with the public employee unions rather than Gov. Walker in the showdown that has deadlocked the state government for more than two weeks. And while a plurality favor a plan to make state employees pay more toward their benefit plans -- something the unions have already agreed to do -- a majority oppose the most contentious proposal put forward by Walker: the elimination of most collective bargaining rights for state employee unions.

Just as damning for Walker, a majority also said they sided with the AWOL Senate Democrats, who fled the state to deny the senate the quorum necessary to advance the budget repair bill.

Despite Walker's efforts to paint Senate Democrats as being in dereliction of duty for fleeing the state to stall the budget bill, 52% of respondents in the poll said they were more supportive of the Democrats than Walker, compared to 44% who were more supportive of Walker.

As to the question of collective bargaining rights, 56% said they were on the unions' side in the debate, while 41% said they sided with Walker. Further, 52% said they oppose Walker's proposal to cut collective bargaining rights for state unions, compared to 39% who said they support that proposal.

Walker has insisted that rolling back collective bargaining rights is a necessary step toward producing a balanced budget. While state unions have already agreed to make concessions on the amount of money they pay toward benefits, Walker has refused to back down on collective bargaining, even as protesters continue to flood the state capitol.

Another key detail -- the poll shows younger voters being generally more supportive of unions and collective bargaining rights than those in older demographics. That's a reversal of what is often assumed to be the case -- younger voters tilting liberal on social issues, while older voters lean liberal on the labor issues.

For example, 63% of respondents aged 18-39 opposed weakening collective bargaining rights, while 46% of respondents in both the 40-64 year-old and 65+ demographics said the same.

That could be a bad omen for the GOP in future elections, especially if they continue to take aim at organized labor -- there are similar labor battles heating up in Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, and elsewhere.

The Rasmussen poll was conducted March 2 among 800 likely voters in Wisconsin. It has a margin of error of 4.0%.

Answer Question
 
sweet-a-kins

Asked by sweet-a-kins at 3:05 PM on Mar. 3, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 34 (67,502 Credits)
Answers (16)
  • sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 3:06 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • IDK. I guess that would require asking each and every resident of the state what they think and I just don't have that kind of time on my hands.
    QuinnMae

    Answer by QuinnMae at 3:16 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • Most rational people, regardless of age, when push comes to shove, are going to side with working stiffs. This issue hits too close to home for too many people. Who's next after corporate and conservative interests are through with teachers? Everyone is thinking it.
    adnilm

    Answer by adnilm at 3:17 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  •  

    IDK. I guess that would require asking each and every resident of the state what they think and I just don't have that kind of time on my hands.

    So no polls are ever accurate?? OK....

    sweet-a-kins

    Comment by sweet-a-kins (original poster) at 3:19 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • I think it's probably 30/70 in favor of the workers. Union big wigs might be fat cats but public employees aren't.
    UpSheRises

    Answer by UpSheRises at 3:20 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • So no polls are ever accurate?? OK....


    never said they were or weren't. I just notice that everyone seems to b*tch about them if they don't agree with what they say (both sides). I don't bother with them because of that. Seems a little hypocritical to complain about them one day and then try to use them the next. Well, it does to me anyhow.

    QuinnMae

    Answer by QuinnMae at 3:21 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • no i think most of us in wisconsin are against it. because of this the city of ashland has just sent out 27 lay off warnings to teachers in ashland.
    unions have been a huge part of wisconsin for a very long time. and you take an economy like this then take away unions power that helps secure jobs and you throw even more people into unemployment. even our local employment agency called CEP is on the chopping block and they have helped put thousands of people into school and helped get them into the workforce with solid jobs.
    wisconsin is a state that doesnt care too much for change and this is something that isnt just a little change it is a huge change and it wont be taken very lightly.
    laura970

    Answer by laura970 at 3:21 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • So laura...

    The problem with the economy in your state is that public employees have bargining rights?
    UpSheRises

    Answer by UpSheRises at 3:35 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • I just hope things turn out well for WI, whatever that is...
    agentwanda

    Answer by agentwanda at 3:58 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

  • I think once the people caught on to what the motive really was about more people started siding with the unions. I think the more this goes on, even more people will side with the workers.

    mommom2000

    Answer by mommom2000 at 4:00 PM on Mar. 3, 2011

Join CafeMom now to contribute your answer and become part of our community. It's free and takes just a minute.
close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN