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Judaism, Islam and the Christian idea of religion (warning contains the B word)

That is, the Beck word. Long but interesting piece here:

http://blog.pjvoice.com/diary/335/glenn-beck-apologizes-sorta-but-im-not-impressed

The short version - Beck made an ass of himself and compared Reform Judaism to Muslim Extremists, was flabbergasted that people would suggest he was calling Jews terrorists, and had to issue an apology to cover his ass.  The link goes to an editorial in a Jewish paper talking about why the apology didn't mean much, since what he really was trying to say was complete BS, too. 

That out of the way, I don't really care what you think about Beck and what he did - there's a whole P&CE section for you to start your own question there.  I am interested in something the editorial author wrote:

" Christians have a particular view of what it means to be a religion —  it isn't necessarily one that matches up well with Judaism. Because Christianity is the dominant (i.e. more populous) religion in the USA, it is that view of religion which most people understand. But it's not the only one. That view of religion claims that it is belief which is the central driving force behind spirituality. Let me be clear: I am not claiming that Christians think that one should not do what they call "works" — what I am saying is that "works" are derived from belief for Christians. For Jews, on the other hand, spirituality is derived from praxis - behaving a particular way. Just in case anyone missed it, what Beck did was criticize Reform Judaism for being more like traditional Judaism - grounding its spirituality in behavior."

He goes on to make a similar comparison to Islam - that the 5 pillars require ones behavior to represent them spiritually.

Is it a Christian trait - to attemp to fit other religions into boxes that mesh with Christianity's rules, or is that actually something everyone does, regardless of what religion they practice (or don't practice), and it just seems more common to Christianity since, as he points out, there's so many more of them running around?

Answer Question
 
NotPanicking

Asked by NotPanicking at 12:14 AM on Mar. 4, 2011 in Religious Debate

Level 51 (421,172 Credits)
Answers (12)
  • I am not Christian, and I do not try to fit all religions into boxes
    rkoloms

    Answer by rkoloms at 5:02 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • Yesterday I got the email from an Aunt about how Muslims can not be good americans, changed a few words and sent it back to her. All I had to do was insert Catholic and point out their traditions and one could ask the same question. There was a movement when Kennedy ran for Pres, some thought he couldn't be a goodPOTUS because of his faith and its ties to the Pope. Pigionholing any faith is a dangerous thing, perspective is a very personal thing, especially when combined with ignorance and arogance.
    emptynstr

    Answer by emptynstr at 7:28 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • Is it a Christian trait - to attemp to fit other religions into boxes that mesh with Christianity's rules, or is that actually something everyone does, regardless of what religion they practice (or don't practice), and it just seems more common to Christianity since, as he points out, there's so many more of them running around?

    I think its a trait among people of all faiths that are egocentric like Glen Beck- Seems that every faith or political walk has a Glen Beck- some are famous like he is- some are not-
    soyousay

    Answer by soyousay at 9:07 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • Not the Beck word! Such profanity! LOL

    I think it may be true of any EXCLUSIVE religion--one that states they are the ONLY true religion or condemns anyone who is different from them. I think there are some inclusive Christians out there too though. I've read books from a couple, and there are a few I know IRL and here on CM. Obviously it comes down to different interpretations for one to believe Christianity CAN be inclusive. I think it's possible, but most Christians are not.

    It may be something everyone does to an extent though, since we all have our perceptions and ways of understanding the world, even if we want to hear what others think and believe other paths are just as valid, we're always going to relate them back to our views in order to understand them or compare them. The difference between someone who is inclusive and/or pluralistic is that they find those other paths equally valid and respect their differences.
    pam19

    Answer by pam19 at 9:10 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • *the difference between someone who is exclusive vs. someone who is inclusive and/or pluralistic. ^

    Sorry. I'm tired. You know what I mean. LOL
    pam19

    Answer by pam19 at 9:13 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • Wait- why didn't the profanity filter catch the B word?
    soyousay

    Answer by soyousay at 9:42 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • Wait- why didn't the profanity filter catch the B word? [soyousay]


    I KNOW!!! 

    SpiritedWitch

    Answer by SpiritedWitch at 9:50 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • Another thought on Beck is that he is LDS- and although I am not against LDS- I do think a lot of times some tend to be very black and white and put things in to little boxes- an example- a co-worker (that I adore) and I were talking about the whole coffee/tea thing-she indicated that it was about the impurities and that is why they don't drink it- she was munching a bag of Cheetos while we talked- I asked about the impurities in the Cheetos and she really had no answer- I let it drop because it is not my intention to make her feel bad- but it does stick with me on how she (and some others I know) can justify based on what works for them and sometimes the big picture does not come in to play- but I guess we all do that don't we?
    I just can not see how Beck drew the line from Reform Judaism and terrorists- and to base it on the political aspects during his very political show just floors me-
    soyousay

    Answer by soyousay at 9:54 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • When doesn't Beck make an ass out of himself?
    And to answer your question I think it is a human trait to try to fit others into boxes that they mesh with their own beliefs so that they can try to comprehend it whether it be religion or politics, etc.
    KristiS11384

    Answer by KristiS11384 at 11:45 AM on Mar. 4, 2011

  • I think we all, irregardless of religious views and/or affiliations, tend to filter our understanding of others through what we already comprehend. Whether it's squishing things into boxes or not, I'm not sure, but it's a matter of viewing through the lens of our own context. It takes work and concerted effort to look beyond our own experiences and accept a different concept. Some people are willing to do the work. Others aren't or aren't capable. Who falls into which category is not inclusive of any one faith-related grouping.


     

    ldmrmom

    Answer by ldmrmom at 1:04 PM on Mar. 4, 2011

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