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4 Bumps

Should bloggers be able to have access to collective bargaining?

Huffington Post contributors think so. Who's side would you take?

The bloggers or Huffington's?

Personally, I feel that if they want certain conditions for their contributions, they should have negotiated that before handing over their work. 

 
QuinnMae

Asked by QuinnMae at 3:34 PM on Mar. 7, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 48 (291,805 Credits)
This question is closed.
Answers (18)
  • This is funny. Not the non-payment, but the specter or unions rising up for HuffPo when ther OWN unfair labor practices are thrown in their face, even as some of the unpaid were probably writing gung ho YAY UNION pieces for them.
    __________________________
    See, I don't have as much of a problem with them not getting paid. I write unpaid content all the time. Cafemom owns anything we write on here and has permission to reprint everything we write all over the web without paying us. If you want to get paid, you negotiate that prior to adding content.
    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 3:53 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • This is funny. Not the non-payment, but the specter or unions rising up for HuffPo when ther OWN unfair labor practices are thrown in their face, even as some of the unpaid were probably writing gung ho YAY UNION pieces for them.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 3:49 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • While not paying contributors is perfectly legal, Lasarow noted, it is “unethical and oh so very hypocritical.”


    laughing

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 3:39 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • Sure. They can strike if they want. Bloggers are a dime a dozen. Honestly, it's more of a name recognition thing than anything. You do work for free in order to make a portfolio for paid work.

    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 3:49 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • This is funny. Not the non-payment, but the specter or unions rising up for HuffPo when ther OWN unfair labor practices are thrown in their face, even as some of the unpaid were probably writing gung ho YAY UNION pieces for them.


    YYYYYYYUP.......

    grlygrlz2

    Answer by grlygrlz2 at 3:54 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • I doubt some of those bloggers really want to know what their "contributions" are worth- NADA, ZIP- a lot of the stuff printed is garbage and no one would pay for it ;)
    soyousay

    Answer by soyousay at 4:05 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • See, I don't have as much of a problem with them not getting paid. I write unpaid content all the time. Cafemom owns anything we write on here and has permission to reprint everything we write all over the web without paying us. If you want to get paid, you negotiate that prior to adding content.

    See, that gets into the whole issue of are they freelance writers or bloggers. I will occasionally contribute blog pieces to people for "free" or for ad clicks as long as it's something generic enough it won't hurt my portfolio later. Same with the things I have posted in group here - those are informal and not something I would necessarily submit as a writing example. However, there is no way I'd take a writing job with something that gets the kind of exposure HuffPo has without negotiating payment up front and in writing.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 4:06 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • I love irony!


    ironing


    LOL :o)

    LoriKeet

    Answer by LoriKeet at 4:10 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • However, there is no way I'd take a writing job with something that gets the kind of exposure HuffPo has without negotiating payment up front and in writing.
    ___________________________________________
    I clicked through to Arianna's response. These bloggers aren't being given assignments- but a broad platform to express their ideas. It's not a matter of Huffpo wants a piece on X, and Blogger agrees, slaves away, does research, and provides a piece that meets their parameters, only to get a pat on the head. They're allowed to write whatever, whenever and how much they choose.

    lovinangels

    Answer by lovinangels at 4:11 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

  • They are usually considered private contractors, not employees so no.
    UpSheRises

    Answer by UpSheRises at 3:46 PM on Mar. 7, 2011

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