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8 Bumps

The puppet masters?

With soaring gasoline prices jeopardizing economic growth and enraging the public, even a novice could recognize the political liabilities associated with rising energy costs.

Yet with all the palpable risks, President Obama, considered to be a gifted politician, is doubling down on his war on fossil fuels.

Following a bipartisan grilling of Interior Department Secretary Ken Salazar at a U.S. House hearing about bureaucratic delays in approving deepwater drilling permits in the Gulf of Mexico, the Obama Administration appealed a recent court decision ordering the department to expedite permits.

The Interior Department warned the court that forcing its hand could make the department “deny the applications outright.”

Obama’s stick-in-the-eye approach to oil exploration at a time when Middle East tensions are flaring sets the stage for a political backlash.

Given his rich history of anti-fossil fuel statements – including promises to make electricity prices “skyrocket” and to “bankrupt” coal-fired utilities – the President is vulnerable to criticism and public outrage.

Opposition political operatives must be drooling over the possibility of producing commercials with Obama’s voice pledging higher energy prices while the video shows gas stations displaying $4 a gallon or higher.

Why is Obama aggressively pursuing a policy that carries such political risk? One possibility is that Obama’s anti-fossil fuel strings are being pulled by billionaire investors such as George Soros and John Doerr and by big business CEOs who have made huge investments in renewable energy and the green economy.

Tim Carney of the Washington Examiner has noted that Soros recently launched a green investment fund to cash in on clean energy technology. Carney has also described the connection between Soros’ support of liberal politicians and advocacy groups that promote green technologies.

In 2009, Soros pledged to invest one billion in clean-energy technologies and an additional $100 million in the Climate Policy Initiative, an organization “whose mission is to assess, diagnose, and support nations’ efforts to achieve low-carbon growth.”
illionaire John Doerr, a managing partner at the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, also augments his financial investments with political advocacy.

Having investing early in Amazon and Google, Doerr is one of the top venture capitalists from Silicon Valley. Following this impressive track record in high tech, Doerr has shifted investment focus to clean energy.

Leaving free-market capitalism behind, Doerr used his influence to advance California’s global warming law, which will boost the prospects for his clean energy investments. When Proposition 23, a voter initiative to delay the implementation of the law, was on last fall’s ballot, Doerr donated $2.1 million to fund the campaign that led to its defeat.

Unlike Doerr’s high tech investments, clean energy requires political advocacy for marketplace success. The Achilles’ heel of clean energy is that it can’t compete with fossil fuels – coal, oil and natural gas – on a cost basis.

Accordingly, the boot of government is needed to make fossil fuels more expensive while rewarding the wind and solar industries with lavish subsidies, thereby leveling the economic playing field.

When it comes to energy policy, Obama has not been America’s chosen one, bringing hope and change to the public. He seemingly prefers to be a ventriloquist’s dummy for climate change profiteers.

The failure of cap-and-trade did not end Obama’s onslaught. Facing a new Congress without a progressive majority, Obama used his executive powers to advance policies to drive fossil fuel-based energy costs higher.

Delays in oil drilling permits and a slew of EPA regulations including limits on greenhouse gas emissions are weapons to advance the green economy and bail out Obama’s billionaire masters.

While Soros’ connection to Obama is cloaked through advocacy groups, Doerr’s connection is in plain sight. Doerr was appointed to the President’s economic recovery advisory board. When that group disbanded, Doerr resurfaced in the new Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, which is led by GE CEO Jeff Immelt. On a recent West Coast trip, Obama had a dinner meeting with high tech tycoons at Doerr’s home.

Like Soros and Doerr, Immelt has placed big bets on government laws and subsidies in order to profit from GE’s investments in renewable energy. With the wheels falling off the man-made global warming bandwagon, these business leaders are desperate for government action.


http://townhall.com/columnists/tomborelli/2011/03/12/president_obamas_clean_energy_puppet_masters

http://washingtonexaminer.com/blogs/beltway-confidential/2011/02/new-soros-hedge-fun-profiting-obamas-green-energy-push-hires-top-#ixzz1G25v1aZm

http://climateprogress.org/2011/02/22/the-re

Answer Question
 
Carpy

Asked by Carpy at 9:58 PM on Mar. 12, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 39 (114,053 Credits)
Answers (19)
  • http://thehill.com/blogs/e2-wire/677-e2-wire/147643-interior-challenges-drilling-permit-ruling-warns-of-delayed-development?page=3
    Carpy

    Comment by Carpy (original poster) at 10:03 PM on Mar. 12, 2011

  • cathyforever

    Answer by cathyforever at 10:03 PM on Mar. 12, 2011

  • So cathy, your saying you can not dispute what is alleged? Thought not.
    Carpy

    Comment by Carpy (original poster) at 10:06 PM on Mar. 12, 2011

  • Obama holds the honor of being "the most bought and paid for President" of special interests that will profit from pushing alternative fuels...even at the expense of our national security and our economy. He will hold a special place in history as a poster child of what "not to do" to successfully run the country.
    annabarred

    Answer by annabarred at 10:07 PM on Mar. 12, 2011

  • Lol no. I just choose to sit back and watch. Like my opinions are going to sway anyone over the internet pffttt.
    cathyforever

    Answer by cathyforever at 10:10 PM on Mar. 12, 2011

  • – collapse
    coughs* Bullshit *coughs
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 10:32 PM on Mar. 12, 2011 (hidden) + expand


  • Cathy is right , here we go again . Even if deep drilling in the Gulf resumes - and it will - it does not alter the argument for cleaner sources of renewable energy and new technology I can't believe you are so dim Carpy that you cannot realise that the US will be highly dependant on imported oil for years and years to come no matter how much drilling is done in the US . Also where to drill is a decision of the multinational oil companies. There are a limited number of rigs and big oil has priorities elsewhere on the planet too. Furthermore, refining capacity in the US is at its limit and big oil is in no hurry to build new refineries . Instead of blaming Obama for everything , why don't you ask big oil to be patriotic, repatriate their overseas resources to the US and build new refineries ? They could save some money by ceasing their continuous fights against clean energy and regulation.

    janet116

    Answer by janet116 at 11:21 PM on Mar. 12, 2011

  • janet, do you know WHY we don't refine more oil here in the US? If you don't..or even if you think you do...research it...get to the kernal of truth. Then come back and talk to us without making yourself look so uneducated.

    I say give him enough rope to hang the entire party with. The more they screw things up the easier it will be to get rid of them once and for all.
    yourspecialkid

    Answer by yourspecialkid at 12:04 AM on Mar. 13, 2011

  • Kathy can you back up what you say? Your OPINION is not really relevant because there are quite a few experts (one of which I am sure is not named Janet from Canada)

    Transocean and many of the others I listed in another post would scramble to drill.

    Furthermore, refining capacity in the US is at its limit and big oil is in no hurry to build new refineries

    It does not matter IF they are at full capacity, If they are what difference does it make if they are at FC with US oil or foreign oil?

    But many are not at full ca[acity

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/refinery_capacity_data/refcapacity.html

    and for the refinery issue you state:

    http://www.drishtikona.com/archives/manufacturing/000562.php
    http://www.icfconsulting.com/newsroom/refinery-capacity-2005.asp
    http://www.icfconsulting.com/Markets/Energy/Marketing/refinery-capacity.pdf
    Carpy

    Comment by Carpy (original poster) at 12:15 AM on Mar. 13, 2011

  • http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/business/july-dec00/crude_12-12.html

    http://www.conocophillips.com/newsroom/other_resources/energyanswers/gasoline.htm

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/analysis_publications/oil_market_basics/Refining_text.htm

    http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/1123/p01s03-usec.html

    http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/sep2005/nf20050920_0695_db053.htm

    http://www.petrostrategies.org/Learning%20Center/LearningRefining.html

    This should be enough to get you started on educating yourself.
    Carpy

    Comment by Carpy (original poster) at 12:18 AM on Mar. 13, 2011

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