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4 Bumps

What do you think about....

kids starting school (Pre. k or kindergarten) early? Or kids skipping grades in school? Do you think it is helpful or harmful to their development? Why or why not should parents consider doing this?

Answer Question
 
Anon344

Asked by Anon344 at 4:39 PM on Mar. 29, 2011 in Parenting Debate

Level 16 (2,352 Credits)
Answers (15)
  • i think starting early is beneficial. they develop people skills and learn more about sharing. real develops their social skills. Its really good for those who have a sinlge child and/or they dont have other young kids your child could play with.
    minki111

    Answer by minki111 at 4:41 PM on Mar. 29, 2011

  • i think starting early is beneficial. they develop people skills and learn more about sharing. real develops their social skills. Its really good for those who have a sinlge child and/or they dont have other young kids your child could play with.
    minki111

    Answer by minki111 at 4:41 PM on Mar. 29, 2011

  • I think it's beneficial. If your child is ready for it, i'd say go for it! I think not allowing them to start early, or skip grades can hurt them in the future... It wouldn't allow them to reach their full potential.
    kaitilala

    Answer by kaitilala at 4:44 PM on Mar. 29, 2011

  • Every child learns at a different pace. If they're capable of taking on school early or taking on a higher grade level, then why not? When did we stop "Reaching for the Stars"? Why hinder them?

    For those thinking that it would hurt them socially because they're not in a group of kids their same age...I homeschool and my kids are not in a classroom full of kids their own age. They are well-rounded and VERY social.
    Renee3K

    Answer by Renee3K at 5:57 PM on Mar. 29, 2011

  • I was one of those kids who started school at 4, (turned 5 mid year of K) and it was tough. I was tiny to begin with, so the early teens years were a bit difficult. When my peers were wearing heels, I was still in rounded (not pointed) toed tennis shoes and flats, as those heeled shoes did not come in my size. I was still buying clothes in the kid's dept in HS. While my friends had driver's licenses, I still had to get a ride, because I was not of legal age to drive. College was also hard, as I was the last to turn 21. My parents did not do me any favors.

    Sisteract

    Answer by Sisteract at 6:02 PM on Mar. 29, 2011

  • On the flip side, my son has a fall birthday, and I held him back. He was perfectly ready for school, but my experience tainted me- My son might have been better off had I sent him early. He glided by (and still is in college) with very little effort, but does have fantastic people and reasoning skills.

    Sisteract

    Answer by Sisteract at 6:06 PM on Mar. 29, 2011

  • i think that a child that starts early has very many advantages and disadvantages. it depends on whether they are ready or not. as far as holding them back or letting them skip its a bad idea both ways either way the child will feel like an outcast and somtimes unwanted by their peers
    nikkupsmom

    Answer by nikkupsmom at 2:21 AM on Mar. 30, 2011

  • I think starting early and grade skipping is one of those things that short-term can be beneficial but long term holds consequences many don't stop to consider when making the decision. My oldest, who will be 9 in June, is currently in the 3rd grade. He's 2-3 grade levels ahead in all academic subjects and that's based on his teacher's feedback across multiple grades. Academically he could *easily* skip a grade. However, at the end of the day he is *still* an 8 year old boy who acts like an 8 year old boy. Our middle school starts at 6th grade. There is NO way DS is going to be ready to take on the emotional and social aspects of middle school at 10 years old. My DD has a Sept birthday. She began school still 4 and turned 5 the 2nd week. Going forward? She has a hard enough time being the only kid not have lost a tooth yet - think of what it would be like to be the only kid lagging in puberty as older peers get there first.
    ldmrmom

    Answer by ldmrmom at 8:10 AM on Mar. 30, 2011

  • (cont) If you find the right balance of school and home education you can satisfy the needs of an advanced learner without putting them in a position that they may not have the maturity and social skills to manage long term. DS, for example, has been pulled out for enrichment classes in the school since kindergarten. He's had teachers that challenge him and adapt their lesson plans to include materials that force him to think in new ways. We also explore new subjects of interest at home.

    Both of my kids have friends that are older than them, as well as same age peers. They are both very social people comfortable in groups or one-on-one. That doesn't mean they're going to be ready to handle the teenage social life of high school a year younger than everyone else or that they're ready to take on the responsibilities that come with college at a younger age. Long term? I don't think it's the right solution for our family.
    ldmrmom

    Answer by ldmrmom at 8:15 AM on Mar. 30, 2011

  • For my own child, they would have to be seriously bored and seriously ahead to skip up a grade.  I would worry about that ONE thing that they may not have gotten in the grade they skipped.  Social skills are a plus and if nothing else, at least they can come away with that.  I wouldn't start early because they learn plenty at home. 

    MrsHouston47302

    Answer by MrsHouston47302 at 8:32 AM on Mar. 30, 2011

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