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Is Britian to blame for many of the world's problems?

Excerpts from article:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12992540

The British Empire in India, known as the Raj, was the greatest experiment in paternalistic imperial government in history.

By the time the British left India in 1947 they had given the subcontinent a number of priceless assets, including the English language, but also a structure of good government, local organisation and logistical infrastructure that still holds good today. Far from damaging India, British imperial rule gave it a head start.

Does Britain's colonial legacy still poison its relations with Africa, the Middle East and Asia?

There's the inheritance of colonial violence. What you saw in the later stages of empire was a series of British counter-insurgency operations, exported from one hot spot to another. In places such as Kenya, Palestine, Malaysia, Zimbabwe, and of course Northern Ireland, the British were forced to resort to repressive legal and military measures in what was to prove an ultimately vain attempt to curb the tide of political unrest and nationalist opposition.

The imperial past is far from being dead. On the contrary it is actually very much part of contemporary politics.

 
tasches

Asked by tasches at 6:58 PM on Apr. 7, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 48 (298,202 Credits)
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Answers (9)
  • Interesting to rake over the pros and cons of the imperial past of Britain and the other colonial powers but it doesn;t really change anything now so there is no point in playing yet another blame game . Besides, some of the tensions plaguing the world today are nothing to do with Britain, Libya, Korea and Iran are obvious examples . It is impossible to say what the middle east would look like now if it had not been divided up as it was after WW1 or if the British had not surrendered the Palestine Mandate in 1948 . That is the problem - in trying to answer the question , one is forced back on a sort of ' what if .....' question , i.e.e what would the world be like if there was no colonial legacy ? And that is really impossible to answer .
    janet116

    Answer by janet116 at 7:13 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • That is the problem - in trying to answer the question , one is forced back on a sort of ' what if .....' question , i.e.e what would the world be like if there was no colonial legacy ? And that is really impossible to answer .

    Agreed
    Sisteract

    Answer by Sisteract at 7:43 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • Study the Treaty of Versailles. To a degree, in historical context, yes.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 7:48 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • , to understand the Treaty of Versailles you need to go back to the Congress of Vienna at the end of the Napoleonic Wars .

    To understand anything in a historical context, you need to go back. especially to the settlements of wars. To the victor go the spoils, and therein we have the makings of the next war.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 8:56 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • Britain, Libya, Korea and Iran are obvious examples

    Actually, no they are not.
    Carpy

    Answer by Carpy at 7:53 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • I have studied the Treaty of Versailles , I have a very good book on it , ' Paris 1919 ' by Margaret Macmillan published about 4 years ago . Worth reading . I do not understand the points you are trying to make , if any, from your last few comments . If you want to look at historical threads , to understand the Treaty of Versailles you need to go back to the Congress of Vienna at the end of the Napoleonic Wars .
    janet116

    Answer by janet116 at 8:20 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • the Devil is to blame for the World's problems.
    jewjewbee

    Answer by jewjewbee at 8:24 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • You are right Carpy that history is a series of progressions although the Congress of Vienna did usher in a protracted period of peace in Europe until the Crimean War and that involved only four countries, one of which, Turkey, was not involved with the Vienna Congress. Then the Franco Prussian war which involved only two. More significant were German & Italian Unification.

    I think your analogy of in your second paragraph is overstretched . Hitler did use the Treaty of versailles as a popular rallying point for his xenophobia just as he used the Jews , but the popular notion , still incorrectly taught in some schools , that the Versailles Treaty ' caused ' WW2 can' t be justified . There were many events, including the Treaty of Rapallo, , the Great Depression , the failure of the League of Nations. and the ascent of the fascist powers and the Soviet Union which cannot be laid at the door of Versailles .

    janet116

    Answer by janet116 at 10:38 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

  • the devil is to blame for the Worlds problems.


    Yes Jewjewbee, and the devils name is George Soros.

    Natesmom507

    Answer by Natesmom507 at 10:45 PM on Apr. 7, 2011

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