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Would it be okay for a college student who is struggling to have someone who is a 4.0 student to redistribute their earned GPA average to the students who are struggling?

This was on my friends post today. What are your thoughts. BTW he isn't talking about grades...

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Anonymous

Asked by Anonymous at 2:00 PM on Apr. 23, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Answers (24)
  • GPA does mean grades. Grade Point Average. And....are you kidding me??? THat is CHEATING!
    minnesotanice

    Answer by minnesotanice at 2:08 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • I once worked with a teacher who did just this to try to force his political ideology on his students. He wouldn't change grades on report cards, obviously, but he would tell students after a test he would 'redistribute' the grades just to get them worked up. I don't personally feel this is an apt analogy in the slightest, unless you're trying to illustrate communism.

    If you're trying to illustrate government welfare, or raising taxes for the wealthy, I think a more appropriate illustration is asking students who are doing well in a class to tutor classmates who are doing poorly OR expect students who are doing well to complete more challenging work. Which is exactly what many good teachers do.
    lytate95

    Answer by lytate95 at 2:15 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • I am not totally clear what he was getting at but it made me feel uneasy either way. I was wondering others opinions and I love your answer lytate
    Anonymous

    Comment by Anonymous (original poster) at 2:16 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • If you're trying to illustrate government welfare, or raising taxes for the wealthy, I think a more appropriate illustration is asking students who are doing well in a class to tutor classmates who are doing poorly OR expect students who are doing well to complete more challenging work. Which is exactly what many good teachers do.

    No, the original analogy is the correct one - which is why it makes a lot of people uncomfortable. It's also not anything new. It's pretty much standard in any polisci or econ curriculum now. For most kids, it's the first time they truly understand the concept of socialism, and they don't much care for it. Your suggestion of tutoring or doing more challenging work is more akin to a capitalist system, where those who have VOLUNTEER to give back and work harder to achieve more.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 2:19 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • what about the 'student' who does just enough work to 'pass'..should he also get part of that hard-earned 4.0?
    or the 'student' who skips 'class', spends 'daddy's' money on partying and other 'fun stuff', and is only allowed to stay in school because of the strings daddy pulled? should he get part of that hard-earned 4.0, too??
    dullscissors

    Answer by dullscissors at 2:27 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • I don't know if it's a true story, but I heard of a class that agreed to a class-shared test grade system for the semester. For each test, the professor would average the individual test grades and each person would receive that average as his or her grade. The first test average was a mid B. The ones who studied were furious; the ones who didn't study were happy. Obviously, the second test average was significantly lower, the third lower still. The entire class failed the semester.

    The entire class learned something very important that semester.
    May-20

    Answer by May-20 at 2:28 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • "No, the original analogy is the correct one - which is why it makes a lot of people uncomfortable. It's also not anything new. It's pretty much standard in any polisci or econ curriculum now. For most kids, it's the first time they truly understand the concept of socialism, and they don't much care for it."

    I understand your argument NotPanicking, and you make a good point. This could also be used to illustrate socialism, you're very right. However, I'm afraid we're going to just have to agree to disagree if you believe (as many who site this example do) that this also illustrates the nature of welfare in the United States at present, or the policies of the Obama administration.

    lytate95

    Answer by lytate95 at 2:32 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • Yes, if it isn't grades then what could it be.


    Honestly, if it WAS grades I would say HECK NO! There are way to many kids graduating that shouldn't be. They can't even do simple addition and subtraction without a calculator. That is sad!

    ItsJustMe1017

    Answer by ItsJustMe1017 at 2:32 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • that this also illustrates the nature of welfare in the United States at present, or the policies of the Obama administration.

    Welfare is a social program, and Obama is a Keynsian leaning politician with socialist tendancies. Whether or not you personally agree that describes him, it is a demonstration of the principles behind the system and that explain the socialist factors of both welfare and Obama's policies in general.
    NotPanicking

    Answer by NotPanicking at 2:34 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

  • I agree with NP's line of thinking. Forced redistribution of your "wealth"...something YOU earned, being sent to someone who has not for the sake of equality, is a "nobody gets ahead" system...and when you're the one that has something taken away, it isn't as appealing as when you're on the receiving end. I see postings that basically say "the rich can afford to help" "they wouldn't even miss that money" "they're selfish". If you think of it as giving away your grades when you're a 4.0 student, having people say that you "have good grades and can give some away" or you're being "selfish" the reasoning is the same...someone is receiving the benefit of something you worked for that they had the opportunity to work for, but didn't.
    Mom-2-3-Girlz

    Answer by Mom-2-3-Girlz at 2:37 PM on Apr. 23, 2011

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