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Is the bad economy literally putting our children at risk of death? should we ignore the most vulnerable members of society or continue to provide social services?

TAMPA - No one ever told 23-year-old Jeri Moss that putting too much water in her baby's formula could kill him.

She had used the money-saving trick with her 18-month-old daughter with no problems.

On Nov. 25, her 5-month-old son, La'Damian Barton, started screaming and curled into a ball inside his stroller. When a frantic Moss reached for her son, he had stopped breathing.

Moss performed CPR, but the infant still wasn't breathing when he arrived at University Community Hospital. Doctors diagnosed La'Damian with water intoxication and malnourishment. He weighs 8 pounds 6 ounces but should be about 12 pounds.

Moss said She agreed to share her story Monday afternoon to warn other parents that too much water can kill.

to read the entire story go herehttp://www2.tbo.com/content/2008/dec/02/na-diluted-formula-nearly-kills-baby/news-metro/



 
ny.chica

Asked by ny.chica at 12:32 AM on Dec. 4, 2008 in Politics & Current Events

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Answers (33)
  • My heart goes out to her. I do believe this heartbreaking tragedy was multisystemic in that there were a variety of issues going on: not just one. 1) Women and children throughout the globe are our most vulnerable citizens with considerable less support and access to resources 2) Education in the sense from the time girls are young to adulthood have less opportunities than our male counterparts 3) Formula companies do not actually warn of water intoxification. Until the past few years not very many people even knew you could over dose on water. 4) Access to proper health care and information 5) Access to clean, fresh, and nutricious foods. All women and children deserve this. All families derserve this. 6) More support for single mothers with chilren regardless their soico-economic status.
    frogdawg

    Answer by frogdawg at 9:37 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • No, I think lack of basic parenting knowledge (perhaps a poor educational system) is to blame in this case.

    It's tragic :(
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:36 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • This wasn't an economic issue, it was a knowledge issue. Why didn't this mother recognize the signs for Failure to Thrive? Why didn't a doctor notice he was malnutritioned during a visit? Was she even taking him to the doctor? There are many, many more issues to this than just economics.
    mamapotter

    Answer by mamapotter at 12:37 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • And FOR THE RECORD, you can get formula for FREE through WIC. She also could have gone to a church for help.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:37 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • mamapotter wasn't an economic issue,
    ********************
    did you read the entire article? did you read why she was doing this? yes it is an economic issue of you can't afford to buy formula.
    ny.chica

    Answer by ny.chica at 12:39 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • "No one ever told 23-year-old Jeri Moss that putting too much water in her baby's formula could kill him."

    I'm pretty sure the formula cans give directions on there. I breastfeed, but I'm pretty sure they are there?

    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:39 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • Moss said she couldn't breast-feed and was just trying to stretch the eight to 10 cans of Good Start formula she receives each month through the federal Women, Infants and Children program. The program, known as WIC, provides low-cost or free formula and food for at-risk children.
    She really needed about 15 cans, she said, but couldn't afford $16 to $18 for each.
    "I'm really, really tight, and this is all I had," said Moss, who qualified for food stamps this month. The Department of Children & Families is investigating the incident.
    In 2004, parents of a 3-month-old infant spent between $78 and $92 a month - about $1,100 a year - on infant formula, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the WIC program.
    ny.chica

    Answer by ny.chica at 12:40 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • So would the bad economy be to blame for a mother who left her child in the car and it died of heat exposure because she couldn't afford a baby-sitter?

    I'm not trying to be mean, but I don't think the economy and President Bush is to blame on the child's death. It's very sad and I don't think she should be punished but I don't think the economy is to blame.
    Anonymous

    Answer by Anonymous at 12:41 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • "I really, honestly didn't know," said Moss, who had just learned infant CPR the day before her son's seizure.
    It's a message the hospital also wants to share.
    "This is a very serious situation, especially in thin economic times," said James Orlowski, the hospital's chief of pediatrics, who fears more parents strapped for cash may be doing just what Moss did.
    Infants on formula should receive no additional water until they are about 10 months old, he said.
    Health experts have been documenting cases of infant water intoxication for decades, with the earliest such cases happening in the late 1960s. By the 1990s, several medical journals pointed to the possibility that poverty could be a factor in caregivers providing watered-down formula or bottles of water as a source of nutrition.
    Researchers at Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Children's Hospital reported three or four such cases this past summer."
    ny.chica

    Answer by ny.chica at 12:42 AM on Dec. 4, 2008

  • anon 12:41I'm not trying to be mean, but I don't think the economy and President Bush is to blame on the child's death.
    ****************************
    no one even mention Bush. so no one is blaming him
    ny.chica

    Answer by ny.chica at 12:43 AM on Dec. 4, 2008