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i am home schooling for the first time this fall, any suggestions on how to take mt seriously ?

every time i make a correction or try to help they get mad, how am i suppose to make them learn and take critisisim

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irishheart4036

Asked by irishheart4036 at 10:01 AM on Jul. 8, 2011 in School-Age Kids (5-8)

Level 2 (12 Credits)
Answers (6)
  • A lot of families recommend a de-stressing period where the kids learn to see you as a teacher and a parent.  I liked this article too, it helped me when I started out.


    http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/62452/homeschooling_tips_transitioning_from.html?cat=4

    scout_mom

    Answer by scout_mom at 10:08 AM on Jul. 8, 2011

  • First, let me wish you the best of luck!! I started homeschooling my son after 7 years (K-6) of public school. I had an uphill battle. He did not want to correct his work or put effort into it. I had to try through trial and error to see what method of teaching worked best. For us, it was using what was around us. For instance, we would ride occasionally with his dad on his job. I would use the mileage for math, the area for geography, have him write a story or poem about where we were. I must have been doing something right, he passed all the end of grade testing with much higher scores than he did in public school. But he would swear that I wasn't teaching him anything since I wasn't using books.

    You are just going to have to find what clicks with your kids. They are not going to like it, especially if you have taken them our of public school.

    One other thought ... check on here (CM) for home schooling groups.
    SpiritedWitch

    Answer by SpiritedWitch at 10:16 AM on Jul. 8, 2011

  • thank you so much for your in put. i will take what you have told me about your experiences and go from there. both kids are excited about homeschool, just worried if they will learn from me
    irishheart4036

    Comment by irishheart4036 (original poster) at 10:20 AM on Jul. 8, 2011

  • I know you can do it...It was a leap for me to withdraw my Down Syndrome daughter at age 18. We are doing great as far as lifeskills are concerned..academics are a little slow..but coming.
    You do not say how old your kids are...but may I make some suggestions being a former bilingual teacher (grades 3/4)?
    You are now mom and teacher, also. You have some amazing opportunities to encourage your kids-24/7. You being assertive and consistent will be a plus.
    When at all possible, use your daily life at home and away from the home as a beginning motivation, or as a follow-up to a lesson.
    For example: cooking: teaches sequence, reading, math-measuring, temperature, following directions, cleaning, eating the final product....There are lessons that break the steps down with pictures. I also have a book that takes a story, offers a recipe and has sequential pictures with it. Then you can go back to your lesson to do drill....

    VeronicaTex

    Answer by VeronicaTex at 11:46 AM on Jul. 8, 2011

  • Continuing....
    Use what the school has done already to help you....(I did with the signing and words....)
    As far as helping and correcting your kids....May I suggest this...
    Either sit at the same table with them or get down to their eye level. Start at the beginning of, say a Math problem (as far as I know they are all word these days). Let them talk to you about it...You for sure, know how to arrive at the correct answer....But let them take leadership of their work...Listen to their logic...have them draw pictures...then work through the problem, encouraging, and complimenting them when they do (even a small part) of it correctly...I have never met a student yet who doesn't like one on one. the important part is that you are drawing information out of them....letting them make decisions, and seeing then where they made a mistake. The next time you will have a productive experience to fall back on....
    VeronicaTex

    Answer by VeronicaTex at 11:56 AM on Jul. 8, 2011

  • Finally hands on is really great...or you making up stories....Laugh....
    I don't know what curriculum you will be using...but surely they will have neat things to do...
    Do not be afraid of having fun...It is the best way to hook a child is to get him or her involved in your lesson....
    Doing work on paper will be a little easier to take. Be there for them a lot at first...but then in time, wean them to think for themselves...Assure them they can do it!!!!! "Brick by brick" building a house...
    I know you can do it , also!!!!!! Best wishes...
    VeronicaTex

    Answer by VeronicaTex at 12:01 PM on Jul. 8, 2011

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