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Colo. lawmakers bombarded with letters demanding 'Caylee's Law'

Colo. lawmakers bombarded with letters demanding 'Caylee's Law'
www.kdvr.com

DENVER -- Following last week's not guilty verdict in the Florida murder trial of Casey Anthony, Colorado lawmakers, like those in nearly every state, have been getting bombarded with emails and letters demanding them to implement "Caylee's Law".

"At first it was tens of them, then hundreds, identically-worded emails all asking for a 'Caylee's Law'," said Rep. Daniel Kagan, D-Denver, who sits on the House Judiciary Committee. "People are very, very upset about what happened in Florida, and very anxious that such a thing never happen in Colorado."

The proposed law, which would make failing to report the death of a child within one hour a felony offense, is being driven by the national wave of outrage over the Anthony verdict -- and a petition now signed by more than a million people online at the website, www.change.org.


http://www.kdvr.com/news/politics/kdvr-colo-lawmakers-bombarded-with-letters-demanding-caylees-law-20110711,0,6834295.story

 

what are your thoughts?

Answer Question
 
geminisummerz

Asked by geminisummerz at 10:47 PM on Jul. 11, 2011 in Politics & Current Events

Level 21 (11,808 Credits)
Answers (15)
  • I don't know that this is the right solution. Not that I'm opposed to notifying the authorities immediately in the case of the death of anyone, but I kind of feel like this is a knee-jerk reaction that hasn't really been thought through. What if the death occurs in the mountains, while camping or something, where the nearest telephone (or cell phone reception) is an hour and a half away? Obviously we want justice here where justice was not served, but I don't think we should just start throwing things out there. Yes, this law might have convicted Casey, but it may pose a problem for the case of accidental or natural death that occurs in a manner that is not conducive to the one hour time limit. I think it may cause more problems than put criminals away - after all, this only works if the criminal is caught and proven to have broken the law.
    -Eilish-

    Answer by -Eilish- at 11:28 PM on Jul. 11, 2011

  • Yeah, we should be extremely careful with this one.
    Angeleyez08

    Answer by Angeleyez08 at 11:31 PM on Jul. 11, 2011

  • "it may pose a problem for the case of accidental or natural death that occurs in a manner that is not conducive to the one hour time limit"

    I am sure there will exceptions to this proposed Caylee's Law. It will depend by the circumstances at the time such as being up in ther mountains and u tried everything humanly possble to try and get help. But if the child was at home and died for some reason like SIDS, any mother who is not a sociopath, will immediately call 911 screaming in terror your childs not breathing. Or even if is was accidental death, such as choking on hotdog and gets stuck and u couldn't get it out and the child dies. Would u seriously wait an hour to report it??? Or 31 days? I know I wouldn't. Casey struck me a a very smart sociopath. If that was me, I would study up forensics, and found if the body could be badly decomposed, its hard to prove cause of death.>>>>>
    Michigan-Mom74

    Answer by Michigan-Mom74 at 3:31 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • >>>>I mean she looked up chloroform and see how it works and how to make it, why not study a little bit of forensics??
    Michigan-Mom74

    Answer by Michigan-Mom74 at 3:33 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • The one hour time limit without exception is the only thing I don't agree with.
    Mom-2-3-Girlz

    Answer by Mom-2-3-Girlz at 8:56 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • I think the law is a good idea. But I think it's sad that it HAS to be a law. Any normal parent, if their child goes missing, or dies in a tragic accident, would report it immediately.
    TARARENEE

    Answer by TARARENEE at 9:16 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • @Michigan-Mom74

    Proponents of this law are thinking how this would've been effective in the Casey Anthony trial, but that's it ... They are thinking this one through. I see this law as being far more problematic than helpful.
    -Eilish-

    Answer by -Eilish- at 9:57 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • And some people say letters and calls don't accomplish anything
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 9:59 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • But if the child was at home and died for some reason like SIDS, any mother who is not a sociopath, will immediately call 911 screaming in terror your childs not breathing.

    And if that child died in his sleep, then it could be several hours before the mother even realizes it. Are you saying that you'd want to charge a mother with a felony for not being there within an hour of her child dying? The time limit poses a serious problem.
    -Eilish-

    Answer by -Eilish- at 9:59 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

  • Not that I'm opposed to notifying the authorities immediately in the case of the death of anyone, but I kind of feel like this is a knee-jerk reaction that hasn't really been thought through. What if the death occurs in the mountains, while camping or something, where the nearest telephone (or cell phone reception) is an hour and a half away?

    Oh for Pete's sake, I don't see the wording of this bill here and I'm sure there are exceptions. You guys are assuming to much.
    itsmesteph11

    Answer by itsmesteph11 at 10:07 AM on Jul. 12, 2011

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