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Moms with Teens Moms with Teens

Desperately trying to start a teen girl group to help my daughters deal with peers

Posted by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:12 PM
  • 14 Replies

Hi, I have raised 4 boys and now still raising girls. Things are so much diffrent from when I was a teen girl. I have found my self struggling to help them. I know that they are not the only ones feeling the stress of being a teenage girl. I have found that my girls do better when they are able to talk to girls with the same issues. Daughter k was in a local support group that only lasted 6 wks. Not long enough in my opinion since teenage drama contunues on a daily basis. Does any one have any ideas? Daughter K and a friend would really like to have a local meet up group.

by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:12 PM
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Replies (1-10):
sahlady
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 2:07 PM
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Unless it is a specific issue I dont know that I would want my daughter sitting around with other girls lamenting over the stress of being a teen girl.  Seems like it would just bread more ill will.

I would opt to put her in an organization that does something. A volunteer organization like Kids Korps, or find something that interests her and keeps her active and motivated.

atlmom2
by Susie on Feb. 5, 2013 at 2:56 PM
I agree. Don't want them dwelling on issues. My girls are 19 and 21. I think we all delt with whatever pretty well. Kids today don't seem to have as good of coping skills as we did. I think parents don't teach it in general. Some times parents need to say suck it up instead of dwelling on things and trying to find a solution.


Quoting sahlady:

Unless it is a specific issue I dont know that I would want my daughter sitting around with other girls lamenting over the stress of being a teen girl.  Seems like it would just bread more ill will.

I would opt to put her in an organization that does something. A volunteer organization like Kids Korps, or find something that interests her and keeps her active and motivated.


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SusanTheWriter
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 3:01 PM
2 moms liked this

I agree, too. Work on her positive interests, rather than her sorrows. My DD is an introvert and a huge bookworm. She's found friends in the teen group at the local library and volunteers there. She's helped backstage at school theatre productions. She's interested in the Science Club and other small group extracurriculars. Focus her attention on what she CAN do instead of what she doesn't have.

Quoting sahlady:

Unless it is a specific issue I dont know that I would want my daughter sitting around with other girls lamenting over the stress of being a teen girl.  Seems like it would just bread more ill will.

I would opt to put her in an organization that does something. A volunteer organization like Kids Korps, or find something that interests her and keeps her active and motivated.


Not_A_Native
by Bronze Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 7:21 PM

Girl Scouts.  They work wonders for stuff like this.

Effete
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:41 AM
I agree to a certain degree. But, I also Feel like just knowing you aren't the only one dealing with these issues let's one know that they are not alone. A group would open up a new window to meet new people.
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jazzgirl205
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 11:59 AM


It depends on the troupe.  DD was in gs where we used to live and all they did was sell cookies.  They didn't even work on badges.  They did go to Disney World tho.  

I would take your dd and her friends camping or hiking.  I have mostly guy friends because, although I'm outgoing, I really don't like to talk something to death.  Maybe you could deemphasize the support group part of it and just do something cool as agroup once a month - mountain climbing, camping, painting, horseback riding.  Notice, I didn't suggest going to the movies or to the mall.  Do confidence building things.  If they need to talk, it will come up in conversation during the activity.

A friend of mine, who often took a group of girls hunting and fishing asked me if I would give them a tea.  After all the running around in the woods, she wanted them to do a civilized activity.  I expected a group of awkward girls, what I got was young, healthy ladies in hat and gloves.  They were beautiful.

Accomplished girls seem to stay out of trouble.

Quoting Not_A_Native:

Girl Scouts.  They work wonders for stuff like this.



cat4458
by Bronze Member on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:51 PM

Do you really mean an actual 'support group' or do you mean a group of supportive friends? Do they get together outside of school at each other's homes & could you have a few friends in to your home for them?  Are they now in groups that aren't supportive or just not in a group?

MrsJoe125
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 1:42 PM
1 mom liked this

They say word of mouth is the best advertising.  Print up some flyers and post them around the school (with permission, if you can get it).  Start meeting once a week or something and make a phone number available for the girls to call if they have problems in between that can't wait til the next meeting.

If you "build" it, they will come.  Teen girls LIKE getting together.
Also, I wouldn't advertise it, but I'd have some relatively healthy snacks available too (not too healthy for the junkfoodjunkies, but not so un-healthy that the vegans won't eat it either; a variety).

I think it's a GREAT idea!!!  LMK if you want help; I haven't do this before, but I'm good at thinking outside the box.  And I think this is an important cause!!! (((hugs)))  :-D

MrsBLB
by Missi on Feb. 6, 2013 at 2:02 PM
Quoting sahlady:

Unless it is a specific issue I dont know that I would want my daughter sitting around with other girls lamenting over the stress of being a teen girl.  Seems like it would just bread more ill will.

I would opt to put her in an organization that does something. A volunteer organization like Kids Korps, or find something that interests her and keeps her active and motivated.




I also agree.
MansfieldMama
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 3:25 PM
1 mom liked this

A teacher at the high school where I teach started a group called "Girl Talk."  They meet once a week after school, and talk about issues that teen girls face today.  She brings in guest speakers, and encourages the girls to grow into strong women.  They talk about how to avoid abusive relationships, what to do if you're in one, the dangers of eating disorders, balancing school, extracurricular activities, and work, etc.  Other teachers drop by and visit, too.  The group has grown tremendously since it started, so there really seems to be a desire for this type of group.  If your daughter is interested, maybe she could find a teacher at school who would be willing to sponsor a group like this.  I think it would be better than just a bunch of girls complaining about how it sucks to be a teenager.  This type of group allows them to commiserate, but offers solutions to their problems, too.

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