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Moms with Teens Moms with Teens

Books

Posted by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 4:46 PM
  • 14 Replies
So I got my 14 year old daughter a kindle for her birthday and a gift card so she could buy some books. She loves reading, and was very happy with th egift. I saw some of the stuff she was reading, and although I've always suported her love of reading, a lot of stuff she's reading about isn't appropriate. I wouldn't let her watch movies with the same topics, for example sexual content and drugs, i mean one of thebooks she was reading was a clockwork orange, which you might know from the extremely violent movie made about it (Ihaven't read the book though) I was wondering, do you judge the content of books differnetly than, for example, movies or TV? And should I limit what I let my daughter read?
by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 4:46 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Shopsha0911
by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 4:50 PM

I really don't feel it's that big of a deal. In our honors classes they read historial works that are far worse than Clockwork Orange. 

GleekingOut
by Silver Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 5:16 PM
I don't with my DD. I don't know what she reads. Yes it concerns me but because she's legally an adult (even though emotionally she's not) I can't take action.
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Soolal
by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 5:31 PM
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I think that as long as you discuss any themes that make you feel uncomfortable that she's reading about, I don't see it as such a big problem.
JodyLane555
by Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 5:34 PM
my 16 yo is an avid reader. she sometimes says a book has violence or sexual content but if it bothers her she wont finish it. I trust her.
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Carmel63
by Bronze Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 9:39 PM

Books with violence, drugs and sexual content were required reading in my 14 year old daughter's honors English class.  In particular,  The Things They Carried.

No, I do not censor my kids reading material.

sabrtooth1
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:39 AM
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A Clockwork Orange is not Saw, Hostel, or even Halloween.  Nor is it porn.  50 Shades of Grey might be a bit much for a 14 yo, but hell, *I* read From Russia With Love when I was 12, and Lady Chatterlys Lover when I was 14!  Books --and movies--  on mature subject matter can open a childs mind, and be the springboard to wonderful conversations about how the characters choices affect their lives.  As with anything, don't make value judgments unless you TRULY understand the subject.   Read the books, and watch the movies, YOURSELF, and then decide if your daughter is mature enough to understand them.

bizzeemom2717
by Jen on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:53 AM
Both my DS and now my DD as freshman were required to read A Clockwork Orange for Honors 9th English. If your DD is mature at age 14 I would think she could handle it.
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nicndetsmom
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:58 AM
My dd read the one series about a teen mom meth head (I think?) I didnt realize she did til she was done, and maybe i wish she hadnt, but i love reading and i want my kids to as well. Better than her watching jersey shore reruns, which depletes the IQ. I try not to judge too harshly because my favorite book as a teen was Go Ask Alice and I loved The Bell Jar.
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sabrtooth1
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 1:44 AM

my favorite book as a teen was Go Ask Alice and I loved The Bell Jar

And To Kill a Mockingbird, Catcher in the Rye, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, A High Wind in Jamacia, Farenheit 451, In Cold Blood, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, Slaughterhouse Five...,

DarlaHood
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 2:00 AM

Books are different than movies because our brains process them in different ways, and we tend to sort of auto-edit content when we read, whereas movies provide a visual whether we want it or not.  I did not audit my dd's reading material necessarily, but everything on her Kindle was purchased against my Amazon account so I would get notifications to my email when she bought something.  Normally she would ask before she bought it anyway.  If I hadn't read what she was reading, I would at least look at what the content was, what age group it was written for, and what the summaries and reviews said.  If it was particularly adult or serious, I would read it myself.  That way I had the opportunity to discuss content with her.  Learning that things happen in the world is fine.  For instance, Ellen Hopkins has an awesome serious of books written in poetic form that cover topics like drug use, addiction, and cutting.  My dd read every one of those books, and I read them too so we could talk about the topics.  She never glorified drug use.  In fact, I think she learned a lot.  I think there were 2 books that I actually said I didn't think she was ready for.  I didn't forbid them, but she respected my opinion. If she is reading Clockwork Orange, then your dd must be an advanced reader and somewhat mature, or she wouldn't even have an interest in that content.  That makes me think that your informed discussion would be more valuable in this case than censorship.

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