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If you or your child did NOT take the PSAT or SAT, please say Why

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[I am not currently the mom of a teen, but I did get my SD when she was 14 & I thought this was the best place to ask this question.]

In my former career, I counseled high school kids about college and then college kids about staying in college. The family I am closest friends with is non-custodial of his eldest daughter. Over the past 9 years I have seen her on holiday and summer visits. She is a really wonderful girl. I have never met her mother & stepfather.

The girl is now about to turn 18 and is entering senior year, so she is considering her college options. She wants to enter the health care field. I don't have a lot to work with as she can't get her transcript since it is summer, and she didn't take the PSAT, although it was offered. She has dyslexia and ADHD and has struggled a lot in school. My guess is that some of the classes she took were Special Ed.   

Tomorrow, I will take her to our local community college for the Accuplacer test. This is the test that many colleges use for actual placement in college courses. The results are not shared between colleges. The test is produced by the College Board, the same vendor that makes the SAT. The results will give her a good idea of the areas where she needs to improve and she can work on those in the next year before she takes the test at the community college she will attend.

My SD raised the question about why wouldn't the parents insist that she take the PSAT when everyone else took it? I know this girl has test anxiety and am guessing that she didn't want to see a low score. However, SD then pointed out that it makes sense to practice taking tests if you intend to go to college, especially in the health field where there will be lots of tests.

So, if you or your child did NOT take the PSAT or SAT, then why not? Thanks for reading.

by on Jun. 23, 2013 at 8:39 AM
Replies (21-30):
atlmom2
by Susie on Jun. 23, 2013 at 7:53 PM
Ours is Compass unless you take the ACT which a composite of 16 gets you in. 800 in the SAT.


Quoting Verrine:

For many community colleges and 4-year colleges, the test is the Accuplacer, which she will be taking tomorrow. 


Quoting Lorriane:


My son took the PSAT but not the SAT. He did not need to take either because it is not what the community college uses. The community colleges have their own testing process.

 

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Verrine
by on Jun. 23, 2013 at 9:04 PM

Many colleges have a certain SAT or ACT score requirement (typically a 500 on SAT Reading or Math) to place a freshman into a regular credit course. A student could be accepted into the college with a lower SAT/ACT and then have to take the placement test to determine whether to start in a developmental course or a credit course. Some colleges require all students to take a placement test.   

Quoting atlmom2:

They do here too but Sat ot Act will let you forgo their testing.


Quoting Lorriane:

My son took the PSAT but not the SAT. He did not need to take either because it is not what the community college uses. The community colleges have their own testing process.


 

Verrine
by on Jun. 23, 2013 at 9:12 PM
1 mom liked this

Thanks. I thought there was a parallel ACT product, but couldn't find it on the ACT site. [When I searched on Compass, I didn't find the test before I saw a link that Kim and Kanye's new daughter is named North West.] 


Quoting atlmom2:

Ours is Compass unless you take the ACT which a composite of 16 gets you in. 800 in the SAT.


Quoting Verrine:

For many community colleges and 4-year colleges, the test is the Accuplacer, which she will be taking tomorrow. 

Verrine
by on Jun. 23, 2013 at 9:16 PM

I will bring this up with the girl. I know that accomodations are available. I can not make her ask.  


Quoting specialwingz:

My twin sons have ADHD and Asperger's.  Yes, there are ways for your SD to get assistance through college.  Every college has an office for students with disabilities.  My sons have testing anxiety as well.  One of the things they are allowed to do is to take their test in a separate room.  This way, they don't get anxious when they see other people finishing the test before they do.  When they see other people finishing before them, they just start putting random answers down because they are afraid they are running out of time.

They also have not taking assistance as one of their requirements.

Don't let your SD fall through the cracks.  There IS a department to help you help her be successful.  Just because you don't have her full-time, doesn't mean you can't tell HER to check into these things.  This department is there to help kids with disabilities with setting up programs that help them learn in a manner condusive to their needs.

Quoting atlmom2:


She needs to get over her test fear or she will never make it in college.



 

Verrine
by on Jun. 23, 2013 at 9:22 PM

In order to get accomodations in college, you have to follow the individual college's requirements. Someone walking in like that would not get special considerations. Anyway, I have absolutely no paperwork on her. 

The Accuplacer is through the computer. It is multiple choice. Correct answers lead you to harder questions. Wrong answers make the test stop sooner.  

Quoting sabrtooth1:

If this girl was ever officially diagnosed, you should take that info with you when she goes to take her accuplacer. Request that she mark her answers on the test booklet, and NOT use a Scantron. All she has to do is skip ONE slot, and the test is worthless.
You should have that in YOUR son's 504, as well.
atlmom2
by Susie on Jun. 23, 2013 at 9:22 PM
It is a computer adaptive placement test. (Just searched and didn't know what kind of test it was either). A form of the ACT on the computer I guess. Thinking it is a much easier test since this college takes about anyone.


Quoting Verrine:

Thanks. I thought there was a parallel ACT product, but couldn't find it on the ACT site. [When I searched on Compass, I didn't find the test before I saw a link that Kim and Kanye's new daughter is named North West.] 




Quoting atlmom2:

Ours is Compass unless you take the ACT which a composite of 16 gets you in. 800 in the SAT.



Quoting Verrine:


For many community colleges and 4-year colleges, the test is the Accuplacer, which she will be taking tomorrow. 


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boys2men2soon
by Kimberly on Jun. 23, 2013 at 9:29 PM

I never took the SAT, I took the ACT instead, because that was what was required by the colleges I wanted to attend.....but that was a lifetime ago.

My understanding is that students who have IEP's that place them in below grade level classes (special Ed) often do not take the SAT because they haven't yet learned the material that is tested.    A couple of my son's friends fit this profile.   Sadly, they graduated high school, and tried to attend communtiy college only to find out that they didn't have the required level of classes in high school to qualify them to take college courses!       They had to take basic high school classes at community college just to prepare them for the college level courses, and of course, they had to pay tuition to do so.   




Verrine
by on Jun. 24, 2013 at 6:48 AM

The Accuplacer and Compass tests start with easier questions than the SAT or ACT. If you get those correct, the test gradually gives you harder questions, until you get to ones that are on more advanced material than covered by the SAT or ACT. Each college determines what score is necessary for what level course. 

By law, community colleges must have open enrollment. They can be a good route toward a career or a cheaper start toward a Bachelor's degree. However, 41% of high school graduates need to take remedial coursework when they get to college and four out of five of those students had high school GPAs of 3.0 (B average) or better.    

Quoting atlmom2:

It is a computer adaptive placement test. (Just searched and didn't know what kind of test it was either). A form of the ACT on the computer I guess. Thinking it is a much easier test since this college takes about anyone.
Verrine
by on Jun. 24, 2013 at 7:01 AM

These days, everyone is convinced that college is necessary for success. A lot of people go to college without realizing the level of work involved. Having a high school diploma or even taking AP courses does not guarantee that a student is ready for college classes. The sad part is that many students have to take the remedial courses more than once. The good part is that some of the students who start in remedial classes do complete college.  

Quoting boys2men2soon:

My understanding is that students who have IEP's that place them in below grade level classes (special Ed) often do not take the SAT because they haven't yet learned the material that is tested.    A couple of my son's friends fit this profile.   Sadly, they graduated high school, and tried to attend communtiy college only to find out that they didn't have the required level of classes in high school to qualify them to take college courses!       They had to take basic high school classes at community college just to prepare them for the college level courses, and of course, they had to pay tuition to do so.    

suesues
by Silver Member on Jun. 24, 2013 at 7:16 AM

here we have to take then why didnt the mom put her in a prep class for the last 2 yrs

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