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7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My Teen

Posted by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 9:11 AM
  • 19 Replies
1 mom liked this

7 Reasons I'd Never Homeschool My Teen

by Ericka Sóuter

booksI recently came across the story of a Tesca Fitzgerald, who, at 12, is getting ready to start college and plans to be working her Ph.D. by age 16. Her proud mother credited her daughter's genius to the fact that she was homeschooled. Amazing, right? But I have to tell you, that is as impressive as it is crazy. It made me wonder if I could homeschool my teen or pre-teen. With the cost of private school in New York City, the idea is an attractive one. But I quickly came to my senses and here's why. Check out the 7 reasons I'd never home school my teen.

  1. I could probably get him through algebra and geometry, but we'd both need a tutor when it came to calculus. Sure, I took it in high school but it was in one ear and out the other as soon as the final was finished.
  2. I can't imagine his first intense classroom setting being a college lecture. Talk about intimidating.
  3. We'd get sick of each other by week four two. 
  4. When he complains about his bitchy teacher, he'll be talking about me.
  5. When I complain about my crappy job, I'll be talking about him.
  6. I can't teach him the same survival instincts you learn navigating your way though mean girls, jocks, geeks, or whichever else cliques exist these days.
  7. I'm not a trained educator. Parents love to complain about their kids' teachers but it's a tough job. Probably one of the toughest. It's a combo of instructor, counselor, soother, conflict resolution expert, and motivator. How exhausting is that?!

I tip my hat to all those moms and dads who successfully homeschool their children. It's clearly not something every parent can do.

Do you think you could homeschool your teen?

by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 9:11 AM
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Replies (1-10):
atlmom2
by Susie on Jul. 16, 2013 at 9:25 AM
Heck no. Agree with all of those statements.
Saw some kids enter hs or middle school after being homeschooled. They were not ready. My girls said this. Some may be, many not. Going from homeschooled to a college or 15 or 30 thousand kids would be overwhelming.
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cege
by Bronze Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 10:15 AM

I did for awhile when mine were younger.  But I felt they needed the socialization of being in a regular school by the time they reached junior high school.  I agree with the statement that survival instincts can't be taught and feel like kids need to be around and learn to get along with a variety of people.  Some may disagree but I feel that just being involved in activities doesn't quite do that or teach them the interpersonal skills they need. 

mumsy2three
by Shauna on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:04 PM

I work as an assistant in special ed and absolutely love what I do but I couldn't home school my own kids, lol. Kudos to those who do.


bizzeemom2717
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 1:26 PM
No I not only agree with the above statements for my own kids it would be depriving them of a much better future to keep them home on so many levels, we live in an excellent school district!
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jojo_star
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 8:45 PM

No. I'm not a teacher, I'm not qualified to educate them the way they deserve, and I also wouldn't want to. 

Cindy18
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 8:50 PM
I have always said that there is no way I could ever homeschool any of my kids.
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SouthernMamaof1
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 8:54 PM

 I'm a teacher, and I wouldn't homeschool my own son.  I teach math.  I feel that I could give him a good education only in Math.  I'm not trained to teach Language Arts, Science, or Social Studies.  I feel like he would get a better education from someone specifically trained in teaching those subjects.  I know from an experience, just because you can do doesn't mean you can teach.  There is way more that goes into teaching than most realize.

my2kidsmom9498
by Silver Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 11:33 PM

I feel sorry for the kids who enter college as young teens, or in this case pre teen.  They will never relate to peers.  When they are standing at their kids' piano recital, and parents are talking about rushing at college, parties, how they met their spouse on the quad, they will never have a similar base, they will never have anything to relate to those who have more conventional experiences.  I have no issues with homeschooling in general, but I would hate to take the pep rallies, clubs, sports teams from my kids.  There are people who do homeschooling so well.  I know several who in rhe area who do!  But, there are many kids here who are homeschooled who will forever be on the outside looking in, they have been isolated other than this one thing, that they just can't relate.  I don't see them gaining those skills as adults if they attend college with kids a generation older then them. 

Jinx-Troublex3
by Silver Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 12:15 AM
1 mom liked this
We homeschool and will homeschool all the way through. Each child has the option of going to PS but so far none have the desire.

My boys both went to public school for a while and it wasn't a good fit for either for a variety of reasons.

So far, we haven't had any major school related issues. My 15yo had depression and suicidal talk/threats and we took about 3 weeks off. We skipped Easter break later, worked an extra week at the end of the year and he caught up and completed the grade. In public school he would have been truant, failed classes and probably held back which would have made everything worse.

However, they do classes and electives at a learning center that is k-12. Each grade group (elem, middle, high school) has different program options. That gives them some school/classroom experience but they do the majority at home. For example..last semester my 9th grade did Literature, small business management, computer keyboarding and Spanish 2 at the LC and his other courses all at home.(he did 11-3 two days a week for his LC classes)

My 7th grader did literature and art and tutoring for his learning disability. He was also there two afternoons.

My 4th grader did "day class" which was one day a week and all project based learning...they spent 3 months (3 days each) exploring the different continents, trying food from each, learning customs and geography. They put together a portfolio of what they learned.
sha_lyn68
by Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 12:17 AM
  1. I could probably get him through algebra and geometry, but we'd both need a tutor when it came to calculus. Sure, I took it in high school but it was in one ear and out the other as soon as the final was finished.  What is wrong with hiring a tutor? Lots of public school students end up needing tutors.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  2. I can't imagine his first intense classroom setting being a college lecture. Talk about intimidating. Why would a homeschooler's first intense classroom setting be a college lecture? Sounds like the word imagine is the only relevant word in the entire post. She imagines a whole heck of a lot.                                                                                  
  3. We'd get sick of each other by week four two. How do they manage summertime?                                                  
  4. When he complains about his bitchy teacher, he'll be talking about me. When he talks about his bitchy mother he's talking about her too. Maybe she shouldn't be a bitch to begin with.                                                                                                 
  5. When I complain about my crappy job, I'll be talking about him. She thinks homeschooling is a job? ROFLMAO. Where do I go to sign up for my benefits and pay?                                                                                     
  6. I can't teach him the same survival instincts you learn navigating your way though mean girls, jocks, geeks, or whichever else cliques exist these days. Right, because all those are tolerated in the real world...NOT
  1. I'm not a trained educator. Parents love to complain about their kids' teachers but it's a tough job. Probably one of the toughest. It's a combo of instructor, counselor, soother, conflict resolution expert, and motivator. How exhausting is that?! All those "jobs" go along with parenting. I wonder why she even bothered to have kids if she doesn't want to do any of those things.


She really comes off as being bitter and resentful of the responsibilities of being a parent. I'm glad she realizes she should homeschooling because if she hates her child so much he needs a break from her.

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