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Please Help!! I think my son has an eating disorder!

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I'm not sure how to approach this, and I know it is rare for boys to have eating disorders, but I'm at my wit's end with knowing how to help him.  He thinks about food all the time and exercises about three hours a day.  He has lost a lot of weight and is at a healthy weight right now, but he is getting overly worried because he's gained a few pounds over the summer.

I've got to wonder if his dad's illness is a factor in bringing this out.  Any advice is appreciated!

by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 4:58 PM
Replies (11-20):
suesues
by Silver Member on Jul. 27, 2013 at 8:26 AM
1 mom liked this

go to dr right now

02nana07
by Ida on Jul. 27, 2013 at 8:48 AM

 I had a relative that wouldn't admit it and every  time she would eat you would hear her in the bathroom throwing up.  And for those wondering no it wasn't my cooking LOL she did it everywhere she went and people started noticing. 

I kept on her  because everyone else was in denial she finally got on some meds to handle her stress and stopped she is bigger now but healthier. 

jhelmke
by Member on Jul. 27, 2013 at 8:52 AM

I hope you can find your answers.   A while ago Dr. Phil on Dish had eating disorders dealing wit boys. It happens more than you think. .

GleekingOut
by Silver Member on Jul. 27, 2013 at 9:44 AM

Until you can get into the doctor - I would monitor his eating. Make sure he's actually putting food in his mouth. Don't allow him out of your sight for at least half an hour after eating (so he can't vomit it up) and don't allow him to eat icecream (ice cream is the easiest thing in the world to force yourself to vomit with). watch his exercising habits, and keep it all written down to tell the doctors. It is not "rare" for a boy to have an eating disorder, it's just not talked about as much so everyone THINKS it's so rare.

bexsmum
by Bronze Member on Jul. 27, 2013 at 5:38 PM
1 mom liked this

Contrary to popular believe you can not make him eat. Yes monitor him but you can't force the food in. Trust me he will find ways to avoid eating or to burn extra calories. Its all about control, if you try and control what he eats when or how much it will backfire and badly.  A nutrionist is a faboulous idea eating healthy does not mean he has to gain excess weight. He just has to learn this and accept it. The accepting it will be the hardest part.  DD now how a shirt that says" fit is new skinny ",

He needs to admit he has a problem as the first step because all the intervention in the world does absolutely NO GOOD!!! until the person suffering an ED admits they have one. That will be one of his hardest struggles admitting to you he has a problem.  Only he knows what his triggers and he needs a someone to confide in. It doesn't matter who this person is as long as it is someone who will listen, and not judge not give advice unless asked and be there as a sounding board.

DD's highschool track is her best resource and he has been a god send to her. He knew well before she would admit it to anyone and was always there to make sure she was at least healthy and injury free and always found ways to get food into her.  Another person my DD confided in was a gf's mother who had been there done that as a teen.  Peer counselling is always a great resource.  DD works with someone who  noticed right off the bat this spring that there was something going on ,she had not triggered but has some lingering effects from the abuse done to her body.  He told he lived the other side as his ex long term girlfriend had an ED and he was there is she ever needed to talk.

MomofBoys838
by on Jul. 28, 2013 at 4:52 PM
1 mom liked this
It's good to know, I did think it was rare for boys. Thanks for your advice!
Quoting bizzeemom2717:

It's not as rare as you think with bots just not talked about as often. I would be very concerned. Glad you have an upcoming appt.
MomofBoys838
by on Jul. 28, 2013 at 4:55 PM

I'm glad she's doing better, and that you stayed on her.  You probably saved her life.

Quoting 02nana07:

 I had a relative that wouldn't admit it and every  time she would eat you would hear her in the bathroom throwing up.  And for those wondering no it wasn't my cooking LOL she did it everywhere she went and people started noticing. 

I kept on her  because everyone else was in denial she finally got on some meds to handle her stress and stopped she is bigger now but healthier. 


MomofBoys838
by on Jul. 28, 2013 at 4:56 PM
Thanks, I'll see if I can find the episode, or see if my cousin has it.
Quoting jhelmke:

I hope you can find your answers.   A while ago Dr. Phil on Dish had eating disorders dealing wit boys. It happens more than you think. .

MomofBoys838
by on Jul. 28, 2013 at 4:59 PM

Thank you, I'll keep an eye out in all these areas.  I appreciate the help!

Quoting GleekingOut:

Until you can get into the doctor - I would monitor his eating. Make sure he's actually putting food in his mouth. Don't allow him out of your sight for at least half an hour after eating (so he can't vomit it up) and don't allow him to eat icecream (ice cream is the easiest thing in the world to force yourself to vomit with). watch his exercising habits, and keep it all written down to tell the doctors. It is not "rare" for a boy to have an eating disorder, it's just not talked about as much so everyone THINKS it's so rare.


MomofBoys838
by on Jul. 28, 2013 at 5:05 PM

Thank you so much for all the help.  I'll keep my eyes open for a mentor that I can encourage him to spend time with.  So far, he hasn't been refusing to eat, just is obsessing about weight, food, calories burned and ingested...

The weird thing is, he did approach me about this.  I had noticed the excessive exercising, and one day he said some quizzes he had taken suggested he might be borderline eating disorder.  I was so relieved, since that is half the battle, with him realizing he might have a problem.  Again, thank you!

Quoting bexsmum:

Contrary to popular believe you can not make him eat. Yes monitor him but you can't force the food in. Trust me he will find ways to avoid eating or to burn extra calories. Its all about control, if you try and control what he eats when or how much it will backfire and badly.  A nutrionist is a faboulous idea eating healthy does not mean he has to gain excess weight. He just has to learn this and accept it. The accepting it will be the hardest part.  DD now how a shirt that says" fit is new skinny ",

He needs to admit he has a problem as the first step because all the intervention in the world does absolutely NO GOOD!!! until the person suffering an ED admits they have one. That will be one of his hardest struggles admitting to you he has a problem.  Only he knows what his triggers and he needs a someone to confide in. It doesn't matter who this person is as long as it is someone who will listen, and not judge not give advice unless asked and be there as a sounding board.

DD's highschool track is her best resource and he has been a god send to her. He knew well before she would admit it to anyone and was always there to make sure she was at least healthy and injury free and always found ways to get food into her.  Another person my DD confided in was a gf's mother who had been there done that as a teen.  Peer counselling is always a great resource.  DD works with someone who  noticed right off the bat this spring that there was something going on ,she had not triggered but has some lingering effects from the abuse done to her body.  He told he lived the other side as his ex long term girlfriend had an ED and he was there is she ever needed to talk.


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