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Do You Let Your Teens Smoke Dope?

Another Reason Cool Moms Shouldn't Let Their Kids Smoke Pot

by Kiri Blakeley

Moms, if you are tempted to turn the other way when your teen smokes pot -- or even smoke up with your little pothead -- you may want to think twice about it. A new study says that, in your formative years, smoking even a little bit of pot can result in lifelong brain damage and cause a significantly higher risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. I know some moms love their pot and consider it a natural herb much like mint from the garden, but this study is kind of scary.

Granted, the study was done with mice (poor mice!), but what it concluded is that teenage mice who were given low doses of the active ingredient in marijuana for only 20 days did weird things to their cheese like try to paint starbursts on it and they giggled uncontrollably when asked, "Who cut the cheese?"

No, seriously, folks, the mice got brain damage! There were also indications that the mouse brains did the same sort of thing that happens in the brains of humans when they have schizophrenia and psychiatric disorders.

On the other hand, the study concluded that the same thing doesn't happen when adults smoke dope. The adult mice's brains were fine after they got high. Says the study's lead author:

Adolescence is the critical period during which marijuana use can be damaging.

Another study showed that marijuana use destroys dopamine in the brain of both teens and adults, making them more withdrawn, apathetic, and lethargic. They needed a study for that?

I know plenty of people who occasionally indulged in pot use as a teen and none of them are brain damaged or have schizophrenia, but some of them certainly are spacey and forgetful!

At any rate, moms might want to think twice before letting their teen get away with toking up and being thankful he or she isn't boozing or drugging. In fact, just keep those teens in a big plastic bubble, 'kay?

Do you let your teen smoke dope?

by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 7:26 AM
Replies (41-50):
katydon
by Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 4:32 AM


What kind of parent would turn their teen in for smoking pot? I understand teaching them a lesson but that is taking it WAY too far. That will go on their record forever and possibly prevent them from getting into a good college or getting a good job. I just dont get how a parent could do that to their kid. Teens make mistakes but they should not have to pay for a mistake like that for the rest of their life.

Quoting 02nana07:

No it is illegal and I would turn them in if I caught them.



rfhsure
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 4:36 AM

I really don't have a problem with marijuana and I would rather a kid smoke pot than drink. 


But, that being said, I just think it's irresponsible as a parent to just wave off that kind of behavior, regardless of what the severity is to you. Kids need structure, and they need to experience authority. I think a lot of parents nowdays want to be the 'cool' parents who let their kids do anything. I just don't agree with that parenting philosophy. So no, my son will not be allowed to smoke pot.

HilbillyMamaof3
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 9:52 AM
I think my example is by all means a worst case scenerio. It is not exclusive to my family though. Im not meaning to offend you, but I know you are very young. Life experiences come with age. I highly doubt you have identified loved ones in a morgue, or watched your mother bury her son from a lifestyle that she allowed. Heard her screams as they pulled her son out of a drawer, watched her collapse while picking out clothes for his burial. Helplessly watch as she wrestles with her own guilt on a daily basis, and at times considered taking her own life. I doubt you've had the pleasure of picking up your third grader at school to take her home and tell her just months after finding her greatgrandfather dead, that her favourite uncle is now gone to heaven as well, and held her little shaking body as she screamed no, it's not true. No, drugs don't kill everyone, that's very true. When they do though, and it's your child, and you've allowed it, I promise the guilt is unbearable. If one person could change their perspective through our story it's worth retelling. It may not 'prove' anything, it's not meant to. The only thing it proves is my brother was a drug addict, his friends were drug addicts and they all died from their addiction to opioids, and That my mothers guilt is unbearable.


Quoting Retrokitty:All my friends including myself grew up in a house like hers and no one is dead. I know a few who did overdose whose parents didn't allow it at all. So you can't really prove anything.

Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:I grew up in a home like yours. My brother is now dead of a drug overdose. You should ask my mom how she feels about this now. Seems great and laid back at the time, and yeah it doesn't always stop with pot, so I dont want to hear " My kids would never do that" In my brothers case it stopped with 3 pages of illegal and prescription drugs in his system, dumped in front of an emergency room front door, dead at 24 left by his "best friend" as he ran home to clean out his house then to tell my mom. Oh and his "friend", dead less than six months later of a drug overdose. TEN all together, ten of them died and two in prison for prescription drug abuse.

Good luck to you, I pray you reconsider. I think that parents like you should have to visit the morgue as parents identify their drug overdosed children and you can hear the screams of their mothers.


Quoting lakerfan420:My oldest (15) has tried it, and discovered it wasn't for her. Plus she's way too busy with school and extracurriculars anyways, and she doesn't want to do anything to jeopardize that. My 13 year old has no desire to try it at this point, but does know she can come to us if she ever does. Yes I am the mom that would rather her kids experiment at home if they really want to, and yet even with them knowing that, their desire is nowhere near what it is with some of their friends. Maybe because it's so normalized in our house (both my dh and I are medical) and they see it as such, or because we've taken the forbidden-ness effect away, or some combination of both. Ftr, I grew up in a very conservative household where pot is a gateway drug and yet all 5 of my siblings and I have at least tried it and two of us are regular smokers. And yet dh is the middle of five kids who grew up in a very pro pot house, and yet he's the only one who smokes, and didn't start until well into adulthood and at the advice of our chiropractor.

Retrokitty
by Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 12:52 PM
Most parents should be able to tell the difference between recreational pot use and heavy drug use. I've had intensive drug and alcohol training but the signs are pretty blunt.

Also age is but a number. I've had a great life but I grew up in a pretty tragic situation for the first 10 or so years of my life.


Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think my example is by all means a worst case scenerio. It is not exclusive to my family though. Im not meaning to offend you, but I know you are very young. Life experiences come with age. I highly doubt you have identified loved ones in a morgue, or watched your mother bury her son from a lifestyle that she allowed. Heard her screams as they pulled her son out of a drawer, watched her collapse while picking out clothes for his burial. Helplessly watch as she wrestles with her own guilt on a daily basis, and at times considered taking her own life. I doubt you've had the pleasure of picking up your third grader at school to take her home and tell her just months after finding her greatgrandfather dead, that her favourite uncle is now gone to heaven as well, and held her little shaking body as she screamed no, it's not true. No, drugs don't kill everyone, that's very true. When they do though, and it's your child, and you've allowed it, I promise the guilt is unbearable. If one person could change their perspective through our story it's worth retelling. It may not 'prove' anything, it's not meant to. The only thing it proves is my brother was a drug addict, his friends were drug addicts and they all died from their addiction to opioids, and That my mothers guilt is unbearable.





Quoting Retrokitty:All my friends including myself grew up in a house like hers and no one is dead. I know a few who did overdose whose parents didn't allow it at all. So you can't really prove anything.



Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:I grew up in a home like yours. My brother is now dead of a drug overdose. You should ask my mom how she feels about this now. Seems great and laid back at the time, and yeah it doesn't always stop with pot, so I dont want to hear " My kids would never do that" In my brothers case it stopped with 3 pages of illegal and prescription drugs in his system, dumped in front of an emergency room front door, dead at 24 left by his "best friend" as he ran home to clean out his house then to tell my mom. Oh and his "friend", dead less than six months later of a drug overdose. TEN all together, ten of them died and two in prison for prescription drug abuse.



Good luck to you, I pray you reconsider. I think that parents like you should have to visit the morgue as parents identify their drug overdosed children and you can hear the screams of their mothers.





Quoting lakerfan420:My oldest (15) has tried it, and discovered it wasn't for her. Plus she's way too busy with school and extracurriculars anyways, and she doesn't want to do anything to jeopardize that. My 13 year old has no desire to try it at this point, but does know she can come to us if she ever does. Yes I am the mom that would rather her kids experiment at home if they really want to, and yet even with them knowing that, their desire is nowhere near what it is with some of their friends. Maybe because it's so normalized in our house (both my dh and I are medical) and they see it as such, or because we've taken the forbidden-ness effect away, or some combination of both. Ftr, I grew up in a very conservative household where pot is a gateway drug and yet all 5 of my siblings and I have at least tried it and two of us are regular smokers. And yet dh is the middle of five kids who grew up in a very pro pot house, and yet he's the only one who smokes, and didn't start until well into adulthood and at the advice of our chiropractor.



HilbillyMamaof3
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 1:07 PM
I have to ask what intensive training you have received?


Quoting Retrokitty:

Most parents should be able to tell the difference between recreational pot use and heavy drug use. I've had intensive drug and alcohol training but the signs are pretty blunt.



Also age is but a number. I've had a great life but I grew up in a pretty tragic situation for the first 10 or so years of my life.




Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think my example is by all means a worst case scenerio. It is not exclusive to my family though. Im not meaning to offend you, but I know you are very young. Life experiences come with age. I highly doubt you have identified loved ones in a morgue, or watched your mother bury her son from a lifestyle that she allowed. Heard her screams as they pulled her son out of a drawer, watched her collapse while picking out clothes for his burial. Helplessly watch as she wrestles with her own guilt on a daily basis, and at times considered taking her own life. I doubt you've had the pleasure of picking up your third grader at school to take her home and tell her just months after finding her greatgrandfather dead, that her favourite uncle is now gone to heaven as well, and held her little shaking body as she screamed no, it's not true. No, drugs don't kill everyone, that's very true. When they do though, and it's your child, and you've allowed it, I promise the guilt is unbearable. If one person could change their perspective through our story it's worth retelling. It may not 'prove' anything, it's not meant to. The only thing it proves is my brother was a drug addict, his friends were drug addicts and they all died from their addiction to opioids, and That my mothers guilt is unbearable.








Quoting Retrokitty:All my friends including myself grew up in a house like hers and no one is dead. I know a few who did overdose whose parents didn't allow it at all. So you can't really prove anything.





Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:I grew up in a home like yours. My brother is now dead of a drug overdose. You should ask my mom how she feels about this now. Seems great and laid back at the time, and yeah it doesn't always stop with pot, so I dont want to hear " My kids would never do that" In my brothers case it stopped with 3 pages of illegal and prescription drugs in his system, dumped in front of an emergency room front door, dead at 24 left by his "best friend" as he ran home to clean out his house then to tell my mom. Oh and his "friend", dead less than six months later of a drug overdose. TEN all together, ten of them died and two in prison for prescription drug abuse.





Good luck to you, I pray you reconsider. I think that parents like you should have to visit the morgue as parents identify their drug overdosed children and you can hear the screams of their mothers.








Quoting lakerfan420:My oldest (15) has tried it, and discovered it wasn't for her. Plus she's way too busy with school and extracurriculars anyways, and she doesn't want to do anything to jeopardize that. My 13 year old has no desire to try it at this point, but does know she can come to us if she ever does. Yes I am the mom that would rather her kids experiment at home if they really want to, and yet even with them knowing that, their desire is nowhere near what it is with some of their friends. Maybe because it's so normalized in our house (both my dh and I are medical) and they see it as such, or because we've taken the forbidden-ness effect away, or some combination of both. Ftr, I grew up in a very conservative household where pot is a gateway drug and yet all 5 of my siblings and I have at least tried it and two of us are regular smokers. And yet dh is the middle of five kids who grew up in a very pro pot house, and yet he's the only one who smokes, and didn't start until well into adulthood and at the advice of our chiropractor.






Retrokitty
by Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 1:11 PM
Enough to be a drug and alcohol counsellor for youth. I'm going to school to be a child and youth care worker. We have 3 classes on drugs and alcohol. I've also taken drug and alcohol training through the hospital. Its a 15 hour course spread out between a month. And I have my suicide prevention training certificate which also covers drugs and alcohol. And I've taken a few workshops with the school district which were interesting but a bit of a different approach.

Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I have to ask what intensive training you have received?




Quoting Retrokitty:

Most parents should be able to tell the difference between recreational pot use and heavy drug use. I've had intensive drug and alcohol training but the signs are pretty blunt.





Also age is but a number. I've had a great life but I grew up in a pretty tragic situation for the first 10 or so years of my life.






Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think my example is by all means a worst case scenerio. It is not exclusive to my family though. Im not meaning to offend you, but I know you are very young. Life experiences come with age. I highly doubt you have identified loved ones in a morgue, or watched your mother bury her son from a lifestyle that she allowed. Heard her screams as they pulled her son out of a drawer, watched her collapse while picking out clothes for his burial. Helplessly watch as she wrestles with her own guilt on a daily basis, and at times considered taking her own life. I doubt you've had the pleasure of picking up your third grader at school to take her home and tell her just months after finding her greatgrandfather dead, that her favourite uncle is now gone to heaven as well, and held her little shaking body as she screamed no, it's not true. No, drugs don't kill everyone, that's very true. When they do though, and it's your child, and you've allowed it, I promise the guilt is unbearable. If one person could change their perspective through our story it's worth retelling. It may not 'prove' anything, it's not meant to. The only thing it proves is my brother was a drug addict, his friends were drug addicts and they all died from their addiction to opioids, and That my mothers guilt is unbearable.











Quoting Retrokitty:All my friends including myself grew up in a house like hers and no one is dead. I know a few who did overdose whose parents didn't allow it at all. So you can't really prove anything.







Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:I grew up in a home like yours. My brother is now dead of a drug overdose. You should ask my mom how she feels about this now. Seems great and laid back at the time, and yeah it doesn't always stop with pot, so I dont want to hear " My kids would never do that" In my brothers case it stopped with 3 pages of illegal and prescription drugs in his system, dumped in front of an emergency room front door, dead at 24 left by his "best friend" as he ran home to clean out his house then to tell my mom. Oh and his "friend", dead less than six months later of a drug overdose. TEN all together, ten of them died and two in prison for prescription drug abuse.







Good luck to you, I pray you reconsider. I think that parents like you should have to visit the morgue as parents identify their drug overdosed children and you can hear the screams of their mothers.











Quoting lakerfan420:My oldest (15) has tried it, and discovered it wasn't for her. Plus she's way too busy with school and extracurriculars anyways, and she doesn't want to do anything to jeopardize that. My 13 year old has no desire to try it at this point, but does know she can come to us if she ever does. Yes I am the mom that would rather her kids experiment at home if they really want to, and yet even with them knowing that, their desire is nowhere near what it is with some of their friends. Maybe because it's so normalized in our house (both my dh and I are medical) and they see it as such, or because we've taken the forbidden-ness effect away, or some combination of both. Ftr, I grew up in a very conservative household where pot is a gateway drug and yet all 5 of my siblings and I have at least tried it and two of us are regular smokers. And yet dh is the middle of five kids who grew up in a very pro pot house, and yet he's the only one who smokes, and didn't start until well into adulthood and at the advice of our chiropractor.








HilbillyMamaof3
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 3:15 PM
All that and you support parents allowing kids to illegally get high? Hmmm.... Good luck to you.

Btw, no one ever doubted if it was recreational use or heavy drug use. But regardless, the law is the law and as a councillor you should know that. It would be in your job requirements to turn in parents to CPS for allowing their teens to do drugs, regardless if recreational or not. And please tell me, when is it no longer recreational? How do you get from A to B? Is only marijuana a recreational drug, or others as well? Is it possible to do heroin recreationally? What about meth, sometimes is ok, most the time is not???? Please enlighten me as to the moment a meth addict becomes an addict and not a recreational drug user? Or when a prescription drug user becomes addicted? That's a pretty fine line with intensive training or not. A little like the difference between buzzed driving and drunk driving don't you think?

My brother was not a teen under my mothers care when he died. You would think in all that training, somewhere they would have mentioned that Teens who use marijuana are more likely to move on to other drugs. Most addicts do not admit their addiction, until they have hit bottom, and by that time they have a battle to fight and many loose. Drug addiction is not a joke, I've witnessed it my entire life.

And in my humble opinion, allowing your teen to get high is very bad parenting. And as I stated before if you allow your teen to get high you should have to witness first hand the ultimate consequence.


Quoting Retrokitty:

Enough to be a drug and alcohol counsellor for youth. I'm going to school to be a child and youth care worker. We have 3 classes on drugs and alcohol. I've also taken drug and alcohol training through the hospital. Its a 15 hour course spread out between a month. And I have my suicide prevention training certificate which also covers drugs and alcohol. And I've taken a few workshops with the school district which were interesting but a bit of a different approach.



Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I have to ask what intensive training you have received?






Quoting Retrokitty:

Most parents should be able to tell the difference between recreational pot use and heavy drug use. I've had intensive drug and alcohol training but the signs are pretty blunt.







Also age is but a number. I've had a great life but I grew up in a pretty tragic situation for the first 10 or so years of my life.








Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think my example is by all means a worst case scenerio. It is not exclusive to my family though. Im not meaning to offend you, but I know you are very young. Life experiences come with age. I highly doubt you have identified loved ones in a morgue, or watched your mother bury her son from a lifestyle that she allowed. Heard her screams as they pulled her son out of a drawer, watched her collapse while picking out clothes for his burial. Helplessly watch as she wrestles with her own guilt on a daily basis, and at times considered taking her own life. I doubt you've had the pleasure of picking up your third grader at school to take her home and tell her just months after finding her greatgrandfather dead, that her favourite uncle is now gone to heaven as well, and held her little shaking body as she screamed no, it's not true. No, drugs don't kill everyone, that's very true. When they do though, and it's your child, and you've allowed it, I promise the guilt is unbearable. If one person could change their perspective through our story it's worth retelling. It may not 'prove' anything, it's not meant to. The only thing it proves is my brother was a drug addict, his friends were drug addicts and they all died from their addiction to opioids, and That my mothers guilt is unbearable.














Quoting Retrokitty:All my friends including myself grew up in a house like hers and no one is dead. I know a few who did overdose whose parents didn't allow it at all. So you can't really prove anything.









Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:I grew up in a home like yours. My brother is now dead of a drug overdose. You should ask my mom how she feels about this now. Seems great and laid back at the time, and yeah it doesn't always stop with pot, so I dont want to hear " My kids would never do that" In my brothers case it stopped with 3 pages of illegal and prescription drugs in his system, dumped in front of an emergency room front door, dead at 24 left by his "best friend" as he ran home to clean out his house then to tell my mom. Oh and his "friend", dead less than six months later of a drug overdose. TEN all together, ten of them died and two in prison for prescription drug abuse.









Good luck to you, I pray you reconsider. I think that parents like you should have to visit the morgue as parents identify their drug overdosed children and you can hear the screams of their mothers.














Quoting lakerfan420:My oldest (15) has tried it, and discovered it wasn't for her. Plus she's way too busy with school and extracurriculars anyways, and she doesn't want to do anything to jeopardize that. My 13 year old has no desire to try it at this point, but does know she can come to us if she ever does. Yes I am the mom that would rather her kids experiment at home if they really want to, and yet even with them knowing that, their desire is nowhere near what it is with some of their friends. Maybe because it's so normalized in our house (both my dh and I are medical) and they see it as such, or because we've taken the forbidden-ness effect away, or some combination of both. Ftr, I grew up in a very conservative household where pot is a gateway drug and yet all 5 of my siblings and I have at least tried it and two of us are regular smokers. And yet dh is the middle of five kids who grew up in a very pro pot house, and yet he's the only one who smokes, and didn't start until well into adulthood and at the advice of our chiropractor.











Retrokitty
by Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 3:23 PM
Pot will be legal in a few years here. You can have a few grams and the cops will not even take it away.
I never said where I stood on teens taking drugs. As a parent I will explain drugs and the pros and cons to their use. I have no problem with reccreational pot use, however as a teenager there can be side effects to the developing brain. The article posted though was incorrect on many of the side effects.

To tell if its recreational use or not there is actually an addictions chart to make it simple. addiction falls under a spectrum.


Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

All that and you support parents allowing kids to illegally get high? Hmmm.... Good luck to you.



Btw, no one ever doubted if it was recreational use or heavy drug use. But regardless, the law is the law and as a councillor you should know that. It would be in your job requirements to turn in parents to CPS for allowing their teens to do drugs, regardless if recreational or not. And please tell me, when is it no longer recreational? How do you get from A to B? Is only marijuana a recreational drug, or others as well? Is it possible to do heroin recreationally? What about meth, sometimes is ok, most the time is not???? Please enlighten me as to the moment a meth addict becomes an addict and not a recreational drug user? Or when a prescription drug user becomes addicted? That's a pretty fine line with intensive training or not. A little like the difference between buzzed driving and drunk driving don't you think?



My brother was not a teen under my mothers care when he died. You would think in all that training, somewhere they would have mentioned that Teens who use marijuana are more likely to move on to other drugs. Most addicts do not admit their addiction, until they have hit bottom, and by that time they have a battle to fight and many loose. Drug addiction is not a joke, I've witnessed it my entire life.



And in my humble opinion, allowing your teen to get high is very bad parenting. And as I stated before if you allow your teen to get high you should have to witness first hand the ultimate consequence.




Quoting Retrokitty:

Enough to be a drug and alcohol counsellor for youth. I'm going to school to be a child and youth care worker. We have 3 classes on drugs and alcohol. I've also taken drug and alcohol training through the hospital. Its a 15 hour course spread out between a month. And I have my suicide prevention training certificate which also covers drugs and alcohol. And I've taken a few workshops with the school district which were interesting but a bit of a different approach.





Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I have to ask what intensive training you have received?








Quoting Retrokitty:

Most parents should be able to tell the difference between recreational pot use and heavy drug use. I've had intensive drug and alcohol training but the signs are pretty blunt.









Also age is but a number. I've had a great life but I grew up in a pretty tragic situation for the first 10 or so years of my life.










Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think my example is by all means a worst case scenerio. It is not exclusive to my family though. Im not meaning to offend you, but I know you are very young. Life experiences come with age. I highly doubt you have identified loved ones in a morgue, or watched your mother bury her son from a lifestyle that she allowed. Heard her screams as they pulled her son out of a drawer, watched her collapse while picking out clothes for his burial. Helplessly watch as she wrestles with her own guilt on a daily basis, and at times considered taking her own life. I doubt you've had the pleasure of picking up your third grader at school to take her home and tell her just months after finding her greatgrandfather dead, that her favourite uncle is now gone to heaven as well, and held her little shaking body as she screamed no, it's not true. No, drugs don't kill everyone, that's very true. When they do though, and it's your child, and you've allowed it, I promise the guilt is unbearable. If one person could change their perspective through our story it's worth retelling. It may not 'prove' anything, it's not meant to. The only thing it proves is my brother was a drug addict, his friends were drug addicts and they all died from their addiction to opioids, and That my mothers guilt is unbearable.

















Quoting Retrokitty:All my friends including myself grew up in a house like hers and no one is dead. I know a few who did overdose whose parents didn't allow it at all. So you can't really prove anything.











Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:I grew up in a home like yours. My brother is now dead of a drug overdose. You should ask my mom how she feels about this now. Seems great and laid back at the time, and yeah it doesn't always stop with pot, so I dont want to hear " My kids would never do that" In my brothers case it stopped with 3 pages of illegal and prescription drugs in his system, dumped in front of an emergency room front door, dead at 24 left by his "best friend" as he ran home to clean out his house then to tell my mom. Oh and his "friend", dead less than six months later of a drug overdose. TEN all together, ten of them died and two in prison for prescription drug abuse.











Good luck to you, I pray you reconsider. I think that parents like you should have to visit the morgue as parents identify their drug overdosed children and you can hear the screams of their mothers.

















Quoting lakerfan420:My oldest (15) has tried it, and discovered it wasn't for her. Plus she's way too busy with school and extracurriculars anyways, and she doesn't want to do anything to jeopardize that. My 13 year old has no desire to try it at this point, but does know she can come to us if she ever does. Yes I am the mom that would rather her kids experiment at home if they really want to, and yet even with them knowing that, their desire is nowhere near what it is with some of their friends. Maybe because it's so normalized in our house (both my dh and I are medical) and they see it as such, or because we've taken the forbidden-ness effect away, or some combination of both. Ftr, I grew up in a very conservative household where pot is a gateway drug and yet all 5 of my siblings and I have at least tried it and two of us are regular smokers. And yet dh is the middle of five kids who grew up in a very pro pot house, and yet he's the only one who smokes, and didn't start until well into adulthood and at the advice of our chiropractor.













chattycassie
by Bronze Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 3:28 PM

 Hell no, my teen was caught once and I told her the same thing.. She needs her brain to FULLY develop before messing it up. I smoke pot DAILY as a teen and am sure some of the memory issues and total spaciness are from this. Maybe not but who knows. :)

bribren
by Brenda on Jul. 31, 2013 at 3:50 PM

No it's illegal. My children would never try it because we have been very open about the dangers of drug use. My DH is a drug officer. So it would be a huge slap his face.

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