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Concussions and head protection in soccer

Posted by on Sep. 12, 2013 at 3:42 PM
  • 10 Replies

My daughter got a mild concussion playing soccer this week. Our doctor and our school trainer both said neurologists and specialists in the area have found no significant benefit from mouthpieces or head protection. I have friends from another school district that say all their girls are wearing mouthpieces. My ex husband wants to buy her head protection and he says he will have a rule that if he buys it she has to wear it or not play. Well, first of all he lives 13 hours away and it isn't fair for me to be the enforcer of this when she heard our doctor say there is no significant proof it will be beneficial. However, I don't see the harm in wearing something if she will do so.  I'm inclined to believe my doctor and the school trainer and not threaten her participation. On the other hand, I want to protect my child. The doctor says the companies pushing their product say they have theses studies about it, but the medical community does not. Anybody have any thoughts?

by on Sep. 12, 2013 at 3:42 PM
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Replies (1-10):
sahlady
by Gold Member on Sep. 12, 2013 at 4:47 PM

my daughter played competitive until she aged out and high school.  I think the head gear (it is like a foam head band) is a good idea... but no one ever wore it.


btw.... did her head hit another head, a body part, or the ground?

bizzeemom2717
by Jen on Sep. 12, 2013 at 5:24 PM
1 mom liked this
What medical studies are your trainer and doctor siting? I'm serious because my dd played competitive club soccer from age 8-15. She now plays volleyball. One of the main reasons she made the switch was injury...knees and TWO diagnosed concussions (mild loss of consciousness) who knows how many mild concussions she suffered over the years? Most people have NO idea how physical and direct contact soccer is. A few of the club teams here (division 1) have adopted the head protective gear as not only protection but an example. I think it's great! All you have to do is Google head injuries and soccer. The law requires us in our state to sign a head injury release as parents in order for our kids to play!
Ok lol off my soapbox. :) As far as your dd can you force her to be the only one at age 13 to wear the protective head gear? You could but I wouldn't. I think as more people become knowledgeable, and more division 1 teams like the ones here do wear as examples the protective gear will be the norm in the next 10 years. Until then parents have to be vigilant and advocates for their kids. It was simply not worth another possible head injury for my dd to continue.
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drfink
by Emily on Sep. 12, 2013 at 6:23 PM

 I am surprised.A friend's son plays in a highly competitive soccer club league. He had a serious concussion.It took him close to 4 months to get back up to speed academically from the head injury.They had a short term 504 placed on him.All his docs strongly suggest he wear head gear every time.His parents and coaches enforce it.One more concussion even close to that bad and he won't be playing anymore.

 

CampClan
by on Sep. 12, 2013 at 8:20 PM

My 17yo DS plays & I feel a mouth guard (as in what a football or baseball player may wear) would not allow for the players to yell audiably across the field. In soccer communication to other players is key. 

HOWEVER, if they were mandatory then quite possibly my DS would not have bit THROUGH his lower lip last fall when another players knee hit him in the mouth & DS had 9 stitches!

Barabell
by Barbara on Sep. 12, 2013 at 8:48 PM

My son plays hockey and rec soccer. His pedi told us that helmets are always better, and she said that concussions are just as likely in soccer as other sports.

I get my son baseline concussion testing every two years, and you might want to consider that if you have a child active in sports. In fact, my son is due for another test by January, and so I need to schedule another appointment for it soon.

Bertieb
by Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 11:02 AM

She headed a goalie kicked ball. Her dad wants to get her one of the foam headbands. She had one teammate wear one last year but we haven't seen anyone else with one, although we know numerous girls who have had head injuries. The doctor did say it seems once you get the first one it is more likely you will have a reoccurence if you continue to play.

Quoting sahlady:

my daughter played competitive until she aged out and high school.  I think the head gear (it is like a foam head band) is a good idea... but no one ever wore it.


btw.... did her head hit another head, a body part, or the ground?


squeekers
by Member on Sep. 13, 2013 at 9:42 PM

 a little bit of possible protection verses knowing no helmet gives zero protection. i'd take the little amount. helmets for football, lacrosse, and soccor, sounds right to me.

tootsie02
by on Sep. 14, 2013 at 3:52 AM
1 mom liked this

I agree with everyone here.  My oldest is in his 4rth year of football.  I watched this educational documentary a few nights ago.  I think any parent with a kid in a sport should watch.  It also addresses soccer. http://headgamesthefilm.com/trailer/

Niccalyn
by Bronze Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 12:11 PM

My daughter played soccer from the age of 5, started playing club at 10, then got on the High School JV team as a freshman.  Girls' soccer is the most competitive sport at my daughter's HS--they've won their district the last 5 years and went to state year before last (the school has only been open 8 years).  She got a mild concussion in the Fall playing Club, then got another one that January in a school game.  She missed 2 weeks of school and still has problems remembering things that happened in that next year.  Also started getting migraines after the first concussion and continues to get them, although thankfully less frequently now.  We finally decided it just wasn't worth it--she's also played tennis since she was 9 so we decided she should go all tennis.  It was a tough decision for all of us and it was hugely disappointing to her, but she now realizes it was really for the best.  The odds of getting a scholarship for soccer are so small, and then if you do, the sport takes up so much of your time that you barely have time for schoolwork.  And like you, all the sports med docs and neurologists told us that studies show the head protection for soccer girls doesn't really offer much protection at all, and the more concussions you get, the more likely you are to get more.  She got hers just from heading the ball one too many times (she happened to be really good at headers, but she is tiny and not really built to sustain that kind of repeated impact).  My husband and I decided that, as her parents, we had to look ahead and protect her future as well as current health, and repeated concussions can spell disaster later in life.  :-(

Bertieb
by Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 1:44 PM

Thank you for sharing your story. My daughter is tiny too. I hope she will stop doing headers now. She doesn't play on the "select" teams any more since we aren't trying for scholarships, so she doesn't have as many games a year to worry about. As a junior maybe she can make it through high school but I agree that it isn't worth it. If she gets another or seems to carry any repercussions from this one, it may spell the end for us too.

Quoting Niccalyn:

My daughter played soccer from the age of 5, started playing club at 10, then got on the High School JV team as a freshman.  Girls' soccer is the most competitive sport at my daughter's HS--they've won their district the last 5 years and went to state year before last (the school has only been open 8 years).  She got a mild concussion in the Fall playing Club, then got another one that January in a school game.  She missed 2 weeks of school and still has problems remembering things that happened in that next year.  Also started getting migraines after the first concussion and continues to get them, although thankfully less frequently now.  We finally decided it just wasn't worth it--she's also played tennis since she was 9 so we decided she should go all tennis.  It was a tough decision for all of us and it was hugely disappointing to her, but she now realizes it was really for the best.  The odds of getting a scholarship for soccer are so small, and then if you do, the sport takes up so much of your time that you barely have time for schoolwork.  And like you, all the sports med docs and neurologists told us that studies show the head protection for soccer girls doesn't really offer much protection at all, and the more concussions you get, the more likely you are to get more.  She got hers just from heading the ball one too many times (she happened to be really good at headers, but she is tiny and not really built to sustain that kind of repeated impact).  My husband and I decided that, as her parents, we had to look ahead and protect her future as well as current health, and repeated concussions can spell disaster later in life.  :-(


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