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Unanswered Email from Teacher. Parent Conferences are Tomorrow * Update*

Posted by on Oct. 15, 2014 at 4:18 PM
  • 9 Replies

Met with teacher last night and asked if she received my email. She swore she didn't and even pulled her laptop out and did a search in front of me. (I thought it was a little staged. There was no reason for her to do all that). Anyways she did explain her late policy. On 9/19 she would not let my dd go get her book or  homework or turn it in late because they went over it in the class. She said that dd did not speak up until they had already started review. From experience she said kids will take a blank page and fill in answers so that is why she said no. ( I can understand that). For the assignment on 9/30 she said she would have accepted it late but dd never approached her on it. DD says she didn't approach her because on 9/19 she was told "I accept NO late work". Teacher apologized for misunderstanding but said she would not adjust grades. (dd had brought assignment). So it is what it is and she will have a C on her first report card. I lectured dd on being more responsible, communicating with her teachers, practicing pro-active listening to make sure she understands what she is being told, and getting her work done. 

On September 19th my dd forgot her social studies book in her locker. She said that her teacher would not let her go get it, nor would she accept her late work. (homework was completed the night before I watched her do it) I lectured dd on being more responsible but never questioned the teacher's decision. On September 30th dd forgot her social studies book in locker again. So she now has three 0's bringing her grade down to a C. All her other classes are A's and B's. I took phone away and told her she needs to learn how to make this class a priority.

10/7 While cleaning out my organizer I came across this teacher's class syllabus. In it she states that all students will have the opportunity to complete and turn in late work in a timely manner (3 days after due date) . So I email teacher asking her if she could clarify her rules on late work. I explained that dd is telling me something different than what's on her syllabus.

The teacher has never responded! I understand that she has a lot of students and might not remember who my dd is or if she asked her about late work, but I feel like she could have replied clarifying her rules on late work. I showed syllabus to dd and questioned the validity of her attempt to turn in late work.  DD insists that she tried on 9/19 and 9/20 to turn in work and that it was not accepted.

So Parent Conferences are tomorrow. It is student guided which means my dd is responsible for taking me  through her schedule and introducing me to all her teachers. DD knows that I plan on asking this teacher about her late work policy. She stands by her claim that she was told by the teacher that she will not accept late work.

My issue isn't so much if this teacher will or will not accept late work. It's her classroom and her rules. I respect that. But if what dd is saying is true, that contradicts her syllabus that was sent to parents. And I am incredibly irritated by the fact that she has not responded to my email. Not enough to get a principal involved. But enough that I have lost respect before even meeting her.

Do you think that I"m over reacting? Would you be upset if 6 school days have passed and you didn't receive a response from your child's teacher? Moving forward dd knows that her butt is grass if she turns anything late for any class.

by on Oct. 15, 2014 at 4:18 PM
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Replies (1-9):
specialwingz
by on Oct. 15, 2014 at 4:29 PM

I had a couple of teachers who weren't exactly expedient in returning emails when my boys were in school.  I brought this to the attention of the school dean and principal by CCing them on a follow up email to the teacher(s).  That got their attention right away!  When a teacher sees that someone over their head is aware of the situation, they tend to be a little quicker in responding.

Sydel
by Group Admin on Oct. 15, 2014 at 4:39 PM

I considered ccing the principal when I first wrote her. But then reconsidered because I wanted to give her the opportunity to do her job. She is also the Student Council adviser and I don't want to piss her off when she's overseeing something my dd is involved in. Again that's why I'm bringing it up at conferences rather than forwarding my email to the principal.

Quoting specialwingz:

I had a couple of teachers who weren't exactly expedient in returning emails when my boys were in school.  I brought this to the attention of the school dean and principal by CCing them on a follow up email to the teacher(s).  That got their attention right away!  When a teacher sees that someone over their head is aware of the situation, they tend to be a little quicker in responding.


specialwingz
by on Oct. 15, 2014 at 5:24 PM

I gave the teachers the benefit of the doubt the first time, too.  It wasn't until the issue continued that I started CCing the higher-ups.

As far as "pissing her off", you have to make a choice.  Which is more important, not pissing off this person?  Or expedient communications with the teacher who is involved in your dd's education?

TBH, I didn't care if anyone got pissed off when I pointed out that someone was slacking.  My (your) taxes pay their salaries.  If something isn't right at school and a teacher is not communicating with me, by god, I'm gonna do something about it.

Don't get me wrong.  I like making peace, not war.  But, when a teacher doesn't respond to my email, that is NOT the kind of peace I am looking for.

I once got told by a history teacher that didn't respond to my email, that he was a also the football coach and he didn't have time for emails.  Let me tell you, I hit the roof!  It was made clear by me, to everyone involved, that he was a history teacher first and foremost.  Football was an extra curricular activity that comes AFTER school.  I took that one all the way to the state board of education!

I hope you get the answers you're looking for from the parent conference.  If you don't, don't be afraid to make noise.  

Quoting Sydel:

I considered ccing the principal when I first wrote her. But then reconsidered because I wanted to give her the opportunity to do her job. She is also the Student Council adviser and I don't want to piss her off when she's overseeing something my dd is involved in. Again that's why I'm bringing it up at conferences rather than forwarding my email to the principal.

Quoting specialwingz:

I had a couple of teachers who weren't exactly expedient in returning emails when my boys were in school.  I brought this to the attention of the school dean and principal by CCing them on a follow up email to the teacher(s).  That got their attention right away!  When a teacher sees that someone over their head is aware of the situation, they tend to be a little quicker in responding.



Sydel
by Group Admin on Oct. 15, 2014 at 5:56 PM
I already confirmed she wasn't out of town or sick. I'll see how she responds tomorrow. In the end pissing her off does not take priority over my Dr's education.

Quoting specialwingz:

I gave the teachers the benefit of the doubt the first time, too.  It wasn't until the issue continued that I started CCing the higher-ups.

As far as "pissing her off", you have to make a choice.  Which is more important, not pissing off this person?  Or expedient communications with the teacher who is involved in your dd's education?

TBH, I didn't care if anyone got pissed off when I pointed out that someone was slacking.  My (your) taxes pay their salaries.  If something isn't right at school and a teacher is not communicating with me, by god, I'm gonna do something about it.

Don't get me wrong.  I like making peace, not war.  But, when a teacher doesn't respond to my email, that is NOT the kind of peace I am looking for.

I once got told by a history teacher that didn't respond to my email, that he was a also the football coach and he didn't have time for emails.  Let me tell you, I hit the roof!  It was made clear by me, to everyone involved, that he was a history teacher first and foremost.  Football was an extra curricular activity that comes AFTER school.  I took that one all the way to the state board of education!

I hope you get the answers you're looking for from the parent conference.  If you don't, don't be afraid to make noise.  

Quoting Sydel:

I considered ccing the principal when I first wrote her. But then reconsidered because I wanted to give her the opportunity to do her job. She is also the Student Council adviser and I don't want to piss her off when she's overseeing something my dd is involved in. Again that's why I'm bringing it up at conferences rather than forwarding my email to the principal.

Quoting specialwingz:

I had a couple of teachers who weren't exactly expedient in returning emails when my boys were in school.  I brought this to the attention of the school dean and principal by CCing them on a follow up email to the teacher(s).  That got their attention right away!  When a teacher sees that someone over their head is aware of the situation, they tend to be a little quicker in responding.

gdiamante
by Silver Member on Oct. 16, 2014 at 12:37 AM

Not overreacting. I had the same problem with my son's seventh grade science teacher. I rattled cages with his case carrier and counselor till he was transferred to another teacher who was a better fit.

suesues
by Silver Member on Oct. 16, 2014 at 8:51 AM

just ask her when you meet her  dont make a big deal out of it I might bring home work too

Sydel
by Group Admin on Oct. 16, 2014 at 8:53 AM

I didn't plan on making a scene or anything. It's an open conference so I don't have a set time to meet with her and I've heard mixed responses about the setting. Some parents are saying all the teachers from one team are in a room and other's are saying we have to walk around with our student to each of their classrooms. Either way I'm not sure privacy wise what the situation will be.

Quoting suesues:

just ask her when you meet her  dont make a big deal out of it I might bring home work too


Momsalawyer
by Member on Oct. 16, 2014 at 10:48 AM

I'm not a teacher but I come from a family of teachers. I agree with cc'ing the principal on the next e mail if you can't get everything resolved at the conference.  

iwashere
by on Oct. 16, 2014 at 1:29 PM
1 mom liked this

In my son's high and middle schools it was policy that teachers had 48 hours to respond to parent emails, barring them being sick, off campus, etc. When a teacher didn't respond (a rare occurrence) I'd send the email again with a little note saying "just making sure you didn't miss this!" I only had one ignore me and the email after that was cc'd to both the principal and her department head. 

I don't think its a terrible thing for you to go to the conference tomorrow, mention the email and say something like "I don't know if you received my email, but here's my question." I always try to give benefit of the doubt once. We all have busy lives. But if she pulled this again, all bets are off and every email after that would be cc'd to somebody in charge.

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