Have you ever felt like some days, you just looked better than others? Apparently, you aren't alone and -- guess what -- companies out there know exactly when to cash in on your insecurities! Super duper! A survey taken by women over 18 across the U.S. revealed that whether we live in cities or rural areas, and despite our ages, women feel their ugliest on Mondays, late at night, and early in the morning. We also don't feel so hot about ourselves on Sundays, when we're sick, sweating, stressed, angry, lonely, or depressed. So when exactly do we get to feel attractive? 

As it turns out, women feel the best about their appearances for a mere three hours a day -- between the hours of noon and 3 p.m. We also don't feel so crappy about ourselves on Thursdays, though this deceptively positive feeling could easily be eradicated by 1 in the morning, when we're staring into our beer glasses and wondering why we're still alone. So, in short, the results of this survey aren't pretty. Marketers feel we can easily be coaxed into buying beauty products on those days in which we feel most vulnerable, and understandably, they're using this information to plan how they can sell us more, more, more. 

While I can't imagine this survey is totally accurate -- I mean, I'd like to think women feel better about themselves far more than the results suggest -- I'm embarrassed to say I completely see the truth in how emotions affect whether we think we're attractive. It makes sense. When I do something horribly mean or am out of control with anger or stress, it shows on my face. I also don't feel good about who I am on the inside, which directly affects what I think of my hair or skin that day. In fact, if I think back to times I've dropped more money at Sephora than I'd care to admit, they always coincide with times I am upset. When all is rosy in life, I just don't need green eye-shadow -- there's no room for improvement during those times.

What so you think of the results of this study? When do you feel your prettiest and least attractive?