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socializing

Posted by on Aug. 31, 2010 at 9:38 PM
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 adopted a english mastiff mix from the shelter about a month ago.  They guestimate her age at about 3 months.  I will enroll her in obedience classes in September by which time she will be around 4 months, guessing. I take her for walks around the neighborhood each evening.  We have no doggy parks here the closest is about 40 minutes away.  Is walking her around the neighborhood and the obedience classes going to be enough socialization?  We have people coming over to the house to meet her and there are dogs along the trail where we walk, but they are behind fences of course.  What more can I do?  thanks

by on Aug. 31, 2010 at 9:38 PM
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SunFlower700
by on Aug. 31, 2010 at 10:17 PM

This is JMO, so take it with a grain of salt.  Sorry in advance for the long post.  I don't do dog parks, but have nothing against those who love to take their dog to one.  I find a lot of people who attend them are not good at reading their dog's own body language, and I've seen where a young well behaved dog gets into a dog fight, started usually by some owner who brings their dog aggressive dog there.  The result is it causes the well behaved dog to develop dog aggression. 

Find a group of friends that you know that have well behaved dogs, and set up a doggy play date in your back yard, or take turns visiting each others homes.  When your puppy is fully vaccinated, take her for a stroll around Pet Smart or whatever pet supply store you have in your area that will allow you to bring in a pet.  Most pet supply stores will allow you to.  Have a bag of pea sized treats, and have people you meet along the way give her a treat and pet her. 

You mentioned you enrolled your puppy into obedience classes and that is also a good way to socialize in a controlled environment.

Socializing your puppy is more than just introducing her to different people and dogs.  When I got my Rottweiler, she was 10 weeks old. 

People and things I've socialized her around:
walking over train tracks,
sitting a nice, safe distance back from the tracks a train is going by,
going for car rides,
going through the car wash,
people on crutches,
people in wheelchairs,
people wearing religious garments (ie. turbans),
people with downs syndrome,
people who walk with limps,
marathon cyclists racing by on their bikes while out on a walk,
other dogs - friendly and from a nice distance in a controlled environment (in a class setting) ignoring the dog aggressive ones,
children (children running in play, children screaming in play),
cats,
birds,
livestock,
agility equipment - teeter totter, jumps, board walk, jumps, tunnel, chute, tire,
walks in the city (since we live in the country),

grooming of my dog - bathing, brushing, brushing teeth, and trimming nails (your vet will love you for this when they have to handle your dog with no fuss),

People of different shapes, sizes, and skin tones.
People with deep voices,
People with high pitched voices,
Men with longer hair and thick bushy beards and mustaches,
Pots and pans being dropped and banged,
Children's loud, noisy toys,

The vacuum cleaner, I actually vacuum my dog.  It's a junky vacuum with a half decent suction, but it is loud and she is not afraid of it.

In an province where Pitbulls are banned, and there is a stereotype of the Rottweiler breed.  I can take my dog to shelter fund raising events and anywhere out in public and not have people running and screaming in the opposite direction yelling "it's a Rottweiler".


Marcia01
by Member on Sep. 1, 2010 at 8:52 AM

if you have a Pet Smart or other Pet stores that allow you to take your dog take her when you go to get food and supplies also visit local parks and go for walks alot of people walk their dogs at the park

tsmom03
by Member on Sep. 1, 2010 at 9:33 AM

 

Quoting SunFlower700:

This is JMO, so take it with a grain of salt.  Sorry in advance for the long post.  I don't do dog parks, but have nothing against those who love to take their dog to one.  I find a lot of people who attend them are not good at reading their dog's own body language, and I've seen where a young well behaved dog gets into a dog fight, started usually by some owner who brings their dog aggressive dog there.  The result is it causes the well behaved dog to develop dog aggression. 

Find a group of friends that you know that have well behaved dogs, and set up a doggy play date in your back yard, or take turns visiting each others homes.  When your puppy is fully vaccinated, take her for a stroll around Pet Smart or whatever pet supply store you have in your area that will allow you to bring in a pet.  Most pet supply stores will allow you to.  Have a bag of pea sized treats, and have people you meet along the way give her a treat and pet her. 

You mentioned you enrolled your puppy into obedience classes and that is also a good way to socialize in a controlled environment.

Socializing your puppy is more than just introducing her to different people and dogs.  When I got my Rottweiler, she was 10 weeks old. 

People and things I've socialized her around:
walking over train tracks,
sitting a nice, safe distance back from the tracks a train is going by,
going for car rides,
going through the car wash,
people on crutches,
people in wheelchairs,
people wearing religious garments (ie. turbans),
people with downs syndrome,
people who walk with limps,
marathon cyclists racing by on their bikes while out on a walk,
other dogs - friendly and from a nice distance in a controlled environment (in a class setting) ignoring the dog aggressive ones,
children (children running in play, children screaming in play),
cats,
birds,
livestock,
agility equipment - teeter totter, jumps, board walk, jumps, tunnel, chute, tire,
walks in the city (since we live in the country),

grooming of my dog - bathing, brushing, brushing teeth, and trimming nails (your vet will love you for this when they have to handle your dog with no fuss),

People of different shapes, sizes, and skin tones.
People with deep voices,
People with high pitched voices,
Men with longer hair and thick bushy beards and mustaches,
Pots and pans being dropped and banged,
Children's loud, noisy toys,

The vacuum cleaner, I actually vacuum my dog.  It's a junky vacuum with a half decent suction, but it is loud and she is not afraid of it.

In an province where Pitbulls are banned, and there is a stereotype of the Rottweiler breed.  I can take my dog to shelter fund raising events and anywhere out in public and not have people running and screaming in the opposite direction yelling "it's a Rottweiler".

 

 

LOL, boy you know a lot of people.  Thanks for the ideas . I'm basically a homebody, since my hubby passed I tend to not get out much, I'm trying to change that, but it's hard. She has had play time with the golden retriever next door and she has barked and yapped at the shitzu's across the street. I have noticed since walking in the neighborhood she is not nervous when the dogs start the barking. 

tsmom03
by Member on Sep. 1, 2010 at 9:34 AM

Thanks for the suggestions!!!!!

SunFlower700
by on Sep. 1, 2010 at 6:14 PM

Tsmom03, I'm sorry to hear about your husband.  I'm a home body also, but found that once I got a puppy, I started getting out more and meeting other dog owners.  Though I still like being a home body at times, it does feel good to get out.

marshsmom
by Group Owner on Sep. 2, 2010 at 10:37 AM

Check with your local shelter or humane society, they may have events that you can attend with your dog.  They may also be able to guide you to some dog clubs that may be in your area, or you could google for them.  If there aren't any clubs you can always start your own!  Beyond obedience there are usually advanced classes and other types of training classes.  Walking and having her out and about with every possible opportunity is about all you can do and is usually good enough.  Good luck and congrats on the puppy.

NancSBRN
by Bronze Member on Sep. 11, 2010 at 7:30 PM

Any dog Friendly stores, cafes, school, I use to take my dogs to a reg. part and socialize him when son has swim lessons.  Just getting them out in the real world as much as possible the first 20 weeks of life is best, the more have people come over and knock on your dog., induce them to all your kids friends and family now as often as you can.

Expect the puppy to sit before betting, putting the food dish down, going out the door.

A puppy class now woudl be great for socializing also. Then obedience around six months .

 

good luck

Nanc

 

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