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Is it ever too late to train a dog to stay in a yard off leash?

Posted by on Mar. 17, 2012 at 8:20 PM
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I want to train my dog to stay in the yard off his leash, it's such a pain in the ass when he gets out and runs off because then I have to go catch him. Last time I was afraid he'd hurt himself because he jumped off a wall to get away from me and I don't think he realized the other side of the wall was a 10 foot drop. Luckily he didn't hurt himself but I then had to pretend I was hurt because it was the only way he'd come to me. He also gets mad that he has to be on a chain when my other dog doesn't - I got her when she was already trained to stay in the yard and she doesn't wander off. Buddy is 19 months old and I'm hoping it's not too late to train him to stay in the yard, especially now that my cousin recently got a puppy and Buddy wants to play with him but it's hard to do that when he has to stay on a chain.

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by on Mar. 17, 2012 at 8:20 PM
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Replies (1-10):
miller060905
by Member on Mar. 18, 2012 at 12:30 AM
1 mom liked this
What kind of dog is he? I think the breed might make some difference. For example, my dog is a bloodhound and he will NEVER be able to be in an unfenced yard without being on a chain. My Rottweiler on the other hand has moved 4 times with us and we were always able to teach her the boundaries of where she could go.
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opinionatedmom
by on Mar. 18, 2012 at 12:45 AM

 what about an underground shocker? they wear the collar and if they wander to far they get a warning ifthey ignore the warning they get a self induced shock. which brings them back in.  after they do this a couple of times they learn the boundries  on their own and you can turn the shocker off. I used a hot wire to keep one dog from jumping the fence. it took her 2 times and she would go to where she could feel the start of the electricity and it backed her off after about a month I got to turn it off an she never jumped the fence again. I even tried tying her to a tire to break her momentum. didn't work. The shocker was the last resort. but it did work she never jumped the fence again.




 




 


underHISwing
by Member on Mar. 18, 2012 at 12:54 AM

 They actually have wireless systems now that can help contain a dog...

anon1986East
by Member on Mar. 18, 2012 at 5:09 PM

He's half Pitbull and half German Shepard, I know German Shepards are suppose to be good at staying within boundaries and I personally know 4 pitbulls that obey very well and stay with their owners when off their leashes.

Quoting miller060905:

What kind of dog is he? I think the breed might make some difference. For example, my dog is a bloodhound and he will NEVER be able to be in an unfenced yard without being on a chain. My Rottweiler on the other hand has moved 4 times with us and we were always able to teach her the boundaries of where she could go.


thundersky
by on Mar. 18, 2012 at 10:06 PM

how old is your dog that stays in the yard? if older then the one that runs off have you thought about leashing them together to have the older dog teach the boundries. or even if the one that satys listens to you and will come back when called.

anon1986East
by Member on Mar. 18, 2012 at 10:51 PM

I'm not sure how old she is, I got her from a shelter and took her because she was going to be put down due to her age and medical problems. She doesn't like going out now, I'm actually amazed she is still alive - in the last year her vision has gotten so bad she's almost completely blind and she's begun to develop arthritis so she mostly stays in the living room (she likes to hide in her blanket and only comes out to eat and go potty) or she'll come out onto the porch when it's nice out to lay in the sun. I have to pick her up and carry her out into the yard now just to keep her active, I've tried taking my young dog out with my older one but she doesn't have patience for him and will stop walking, stand there and growl at him because of course he just wants to play with her.

Quoting thundersky:

how old is your dog that stays in the yard? if older then the one that runs off have you thought about leashing them together to have the older dog teach the boundries. or even if the one that satys listens to you and will come back when called.


harmony7
by on Mar. 19, 2012 at 8:15 AM
1 mom liked this

 We teach recall with a long light line and lots of yummy treats...come...make fool of self saying good girl and treat, treat, treat...if no recall a nice pop on the long line attached to a choke collar and call again...fool of self and treat treat treat....coming becomes a whole lot more intersesting then other side of fence. Practice in house as well....Most of all she does not respect you so I  will wear the dogs tied to my belt for a time to make them pay attention to me and what I am doing during the day. It teaches respect and awareness. Never let dog enter or exit house before you do so you are the leader..you may have noticed her bolting in or out when you open the door, that is not all about being in a hurry to go somewhere as much as it is about letting you know she runs the show. Work on obediance with her starting with sits which are easy to teach and go from there. Classes would be helpful to get you going and to establish you as her leader. Work with her daily. No quick fixes here but lots of things you can do that will lead to improvement in a fairly short time.

Pam in Alabama
A Mom to nine sons and one daughter with six still at home!
NancSBRN
by Bronze Member on Mar. 19, 2012 at 11:24 AM
1 mom liked this

Traing is y our Key to success real traingf or about 21 days Recall is the most important command a dog should learn. I work on a long line at about 20 feet and reward for the recall profusely.  It has to become second nature to the dog to turn around and  come when called.  Then you can work on boundries. Personally I would never trust any dog no matter how well trained they are to stay in a yard without some sort of fencing. I have had to many friends lose Well Trained dogs to someone leaving a gate open and the dogs getting out on the road when the owners did not know.

We added gates and changed our fence lines a year ago because of a couple close calls with our well tranined dogs who have exccellent recalls.

It only take a second for a dog to get killed on a road.

KyliesMom5
by Group Admin on Mar. 19, 2012 at 4:45 PM

age reallly does not matter. You can teach them new things at pretty much any age. When I first got my golden retriever (she has since passed), she was 6 years old and I was told she was to stupid to learn anything. She would bolt from the yard if she was off leash and got just a short distance from us. So I did was put her on a long leash(i think it was a 50ft) and I started working on her recalls. I did use treats and in the beginning I used chicken nuggets that she only got when she came when called. During this time I also taught her the command "wait" so that I could go get her without worrying that she would take off down the road if she started to take off.   The key is repetition and consistency.

ICPclwnLOV
by on Mar. 21, 2012 at 2:01 PM

I cant help with this one. My dogs have always been good about being off the leash with no proble. Sometimes one of my dogs would leave the yard but rarely. My parents have an invisible fence for their lab. I dont recommend them. Imho, it is inhumane. Plus some dogs,like my parents', learn to bolt through the fence. Then they dont want to come back because they are afraid of the shock.

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