Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

9-11 Electronic Hijacking?

Posted by on Dec. 19, 2010 at 11:51 AM
  • 2 Replies
  • 351 Total Views

http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/hanjour.html

On 27 November 2009 PilotsFor911Truth.org published a simple fact about the flight of Flight 77 which makes a conventional hijacking scenario impossible - according to Flight Data provided by the NTSB the Flight Deck Door was never opened in flight. The status of the door was polled every 5 seconds from 12:18:05 GMT to 13:37:09 GMT, and each poll logged the door as closed (a CSV file of the log can be downloaded here).

No-one entered the cockpit of the plane during the flight, therefore it was not flown into the Pentagon by an Arab hijacker.

What caused Flight 77 to hit the Pentagon? Electronic hijacking is a strong possibility...

Link to electronic hijacking article. http://www.public-action.com/911/robotplane.html

by on Dec. 19, 2010 at 11:51 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-2):
erimar2
by on Dec. 28, 2010 at 12:33 AM

Hani Hanjour as a Cessna 172 pilot


Cockpit of a Cessna 172

At Freeway Airport in Bowie, Md., 20 miles west of Washington, flight instructor Sheri Baxter instantly recognized the name of alleged hijacker Hani Hanjour when the FBI released a list of 19 suspects in the four hijackings. Hanjour, the only suspect on Flight 77 the FBI listed as a pilot, had come to the airport one month earlier seeking to rent a small plane.

However, when Baxter and fellow instructor Ben Conner took the slender, soft-spoken Hanjour on three test runs during the second week of August, they found he had trouble controlling and landing the single-engine Cessna 172. Even though Hanjour showed a federal pilot's license and a log book cataloging 600 hours of flying experience, chief flight instructor Marcel Bernard declined to rent him a plane without more lessons.

In the spring of 2000, Hanjour had asked to enroll in the CRM Airline Training Center in Scottsdale, Ariz., for advanced training, said the center's attorney, Gerald Chilton Jr. Hanjour had attended the school for three months in late 1996 and again in December 1997 but never finished coursework for a license to fly a single-engine aircraft, Chilton said.

When Hanjour reapplied to the center last year, "We declined to provide training to him because we didn't think he was a good enough student when he was there in 1996 and 1997" Chilton said. [Newsday]

"This guy could not solo a Cessna 150 ... and what I mean by solo is a pilot's first time out without anyone in the cockpit with him. It's the most simple, the most fundamental flying exercise one can engage in..."

WMV video download (588kB)

 Next time you feel like you want to share your narrow-minded opinion about someone's situation, stop and ask yourself, "Is this some of my business?"

kcangel63
by Group Owner on Jan. 5, 2011 at 1:03 PM

My DH learned about how the aircraft can be controlled remotely from the ground in flight school (pre 9/11).  Pretty interesting stuff.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)