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Does anyone have a good recipe for something quick that will help me, a breast feeding mommy?

Posted by on Dec. 1, 2009 at 4:48 PM
  • 4 Replies

 

 My daughter, Maya, turned 3 weeks old on Thanksgiving day and she has always had some trouble with gas.  I am not sure, but I think it might have a problem with her not burping very well for me.  But I also have a 19 mo who is not exactly a picky eater, but she definitely does have foods that hit her tastes one day and definitely not the next....

I guess I am looking for any and all recipes that do not really promote gassiness in the baby, but are relatively quick and easy to fix for myself and my 19 mo.  Any and all recipes are welcome! 

 Thank you!

    ~Melissa

by on Dec. 1, 2009 at 4:48 PM
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bergencounty
by Member on Dec. 1, 2009 at 9:41 PM

 While there's no reason not to indulge the occasional craving, you might want to hold off on the spicy food (and onions and cheese) until you're sure your nursing baby isn't sensitive to what you're eating. Gas and fussiness in your baby are the most common signs that something you ate has made its way into your breast milk. Diarrhea and a skin rash could signal an allergy. Talk to your doctor before making any changes to your diet — good nutrition is essential for nursing mothers.



Food Solution
Cabbage, onion, garlic, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, peppers, cucumbers, and turnips can cause gas and fussiness, which usually lasts up to 24 hours and then disappears. Cut out the offending foods in your diet (at least for the first few months of breastfeeding) until your baby's gastrointestinal tract is more developed.

 
Cows' milk products (such as milk, cheese, yogurt, and even butter) in your diet may cause an allergic reaction in your baby. Symptoms can appear anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours after breastfeeding and may include diarrhea, rash, fussiness, and gas or runny nose, cough, or congestion. Cut out all dairy products from your diet for two weeks to see if your baby's condition improves.
Citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and tangerines are common irritants. Symptoms may include fussiness, vomiting, diarrhea, skin rashes, hives, and sniffles. Cut out the suspect foods for about a week (long enough to get them completely out of your system). Then reintroduce one food at a time to find the culprit.
Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine that's a gastric irritant. Symptoms may include fussiness and diarrhea. Cut out the candy bars for about a week (long enough to get them completely out of your system) to see if your baby's condition improves.
Eggs, wheat, corn, fish, peanuts, nuts, and soy are allergens. Symptoms may include fussiness, vomiting, diarrhea, skin rashes, hives, and sniffles. "Stray" proteins from some of these foods may be absorbed into your bloodstream and pass into your milk. Keep a chart of what you've been eating, and when. Cut out the suspect foods for about a week (long enough to get them completely out of your system). Then reintroduce one food at a time to find the culprit. But don't drastically alter your diet without talking to your doctor first.




Herbs
Although herbs are considered natural alternatives to certain drugs, they can be just as powerful — and just as toxic. Like drugs, chemical ingredients from herbs do get into breast milk. While herbs such as fenugreek and fennel have been used for centuries to increase a nursing mother's milk supply, little is known about how herbs affect a nursing baby. Play it safe and consult with your doctor before taking any herbal remedy.

Herbs What you should know
Chamomile, ginger, echinacea Taken in teas, these herbs probably pose no danger to your baby. Drink any herbal tea with caution, however, especially when you don't know all the ingredients. (Stay away from goldenseal, which often comes with echinacea, because it can be toxic in moderate doses and experts aren't sure of its effects on nursing babies.) Most teas are benign, but some have been known to cause liver toxicity, warns Jan Barger, a registered nurse and lactation expert.
Ground fenugreek, anise, borage, raspberry leaves, blessed thistle, saw palmetto, dill, chaste tree, garlic, nettles, fennel seeds, goat's rue, false unicorn root, vervain, cinnamon These herbs are often used as milk boosters and are generally safe for your baby. Fenugreek is sometimes sold in Mother's Milk tea, which can contain other herbs that may not be good for your baby. Taking any of these herbs in high dosages may cause your perspiration to smell like maple syrup.
Mint, sage, parsley These herbs, most often eaten in food, may dry up your milk supply. Avoid them if you're trying to breastfeed, but you can use them when you start to wean — they won't hurt your baby.
Feverfew This herb is used to treat migraines. Don't take it while breastfeeding, as it may increase your baby's heart rate.
St. John's Wort This herb is used to treat depression. Don't take it while breastfeeding as no studies have been done to see whether it's safe for nursing moms. It could affect milk production and can reduce the effectiveness of certain drugs.



rkoloms
by on Dec. 2, 2009 at 8:15 AM

When my baby had colic, about all I ate was yogurt and brown rice with ginger and soy sauce (it didn't help).

Robin in Chicago

CaitlynnMaya
by on Dec. 2, 2009 at 9:32 PM

 

  Thank you ladies for the replies to my question.... Maya does not have colic, but she is spitting up quite a bit, and her favorite past time so far seems to be fussing... hopefully she will grow out of it soon.

table4six
by on Dec. 3, 2009 at 9:35 AM

I am not sure about this helping with breastfeeding but we had something good (and easy) for supper last night.  We just took pitas and sliced them in half and stuffed them with deli roast beef and provolonecheese.  Then we put them in the oven and warmed the bread and melted the cheese.  It was easy and very simple.  Even the picky kids like the pocket sandwiches.

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