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Recipes for Busy Moms Recipes for Busy Moms

Ingredient of the Week, March 28: Garlic

Posted by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:45 AM
  • 23 Replies

 

Garlic is related to the lily family, which includes onions, shallots, chives and leaks.  

Dating back over 6,000 years, it is native to Central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was believed to be used as food flavoring and seasoning.  Garlic was being used in Egypt by 3,000 B.C.  Later it was used in Pakistan and Western India and spread to China. The Spanish, Portuguese and French introduced it to the New World.  Today, garlic is grown all over the world.

Egyptians worshiped garlic and placed clay models of garlic bulbs in the tomb of Tutankhamen. The Egyptians fed garlic to slaves, who were building the pyramids, to increase their stamina.  Ancient Greeks and Romans claimed that garlic was used to repel scorpions, treat bladder infections and dog bites, cure leprosy and asthma.  It was thought that hanging garlic bulbs on doors would stop the spread of smallpox.Garlic was so highly-prized, it was even used as currency. Folklore holds that garlic repelled vampires, protected against the Evil Eye, and warded off jealous nymphs said to terrorize pregnant women and engaged maidens.

Ancient Indians valued the medicinal properties of garlic and thought it to be an aphrodisiac.  It was believed to cure several illnesses and promote a long life.  During World War II, garlic was used as an antiseptic to disinfect open wounds and prevent gangrene.  


 Surprisingly, garlic was frowned upon by foodie snobs in the United States until the first quarter of the twentieth century, being found almost exclusively in ethnic dishes in working-class neighborhoods. But, by 1940, America had embraced garlic, finally recognizing its value as not only a minor seasoning, but as a major ingredient in recipes.

Quaint diner slang of the 1920's referred to garlic as Bronx vanilla, halitosis, and Italian perfume. Today, Americans alone consume more than 250 million pounds of garlic annually.

How do you use garlic, in what dishes? Please share your favorite recipes.

by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:45 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Kimberly954
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:50 AM

Um.... in everything! LOL

periwinkle163
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:52 AM

 Okay, I use garlic in too many things to list. I make an awesome garlic chicken with sauteedgarlic. My sil came to our house once while I was cooking it and said Wow it smells like garlic in here, and I said thanks,lol. She didn't mean it as a compliment though. My dh's catchphrase is needs more garlic.

periwinkle163
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:53 AM

 I even made garlic chocolate chip cookies once, I actually really liked them, but no-one else would even try them,lol

bethmoore71
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 12:28 PM

After reading the info on garlic, I now understand why the TNT recipes from my (Irish-American) grandmother and her sorority friends weren't very creative in the seasoning department (bland). They were all born around 1910-1920, and were homemakers from the 1930's or 1940's, on. My mom, born in 1942 and a homemaker from 1958 to 1980 (yep, she was a teen pregnancy statistic), cooked just like her mom. She gave birth to three daughters who love using herbs & spices liberally, and she's just now starting to play in the kitchen LOL!

Man, what can I say about garlic? I buy it minced in the big jars for my little family of 2. There's not alot of dinners I prepare that I don't use garlic. The last meal I made, was a quick & easy (my specialty LOL, because I work full time) one. I did (frozen) cheddar & potato pierogies sauteed in minced garlic, chopped fresh rosemary, and sliced red bell pepper in butter. While the pierogies are boiling, I'm sauteing the other ingredients. When the pierogies are done, I transfer them into my skillet and continue sauteing for a couple minutes. Served with a side veggie, this is a frequently prepared weeknight meal of mine!

Undomesticated
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 12:36 PM

I love, love, love garlic.  We use it in pretty much everything.  I use a little less than I did before getting pregnant with Marlee.  Since being pregnant with her, my taste for garlic has changed.  Still love it, but have found that I can't eat as much as I used to.

I love to roast it and spread it on toast or put into my mashed potatoes.

lori57703
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 1:00 PM

The joke in my house is that garlic goes in everything I cook except pancakes! I love it however I can get it. Here is one of my favorite and really easy recipes:

Garlic Roasted Chicken and Red Potatoes

For each serving:

1 bonless/skinless chicken breast

2 small red potatoes, halved or quartered

1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves (each fairly large), pealed but left whole

1/2 tsp. each of dried basil and oregano

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Coat baking dish large enough to hold all of chicken, potatoes, and garlic with olive oil. Place peeled garlic cloves in dish and coat with olive oil. Place pan in hot oven for 10 minutes. While garlic is roasting wash, dry and slice potatoes. If desired season chicken breasts with salt and pepper and quickly brown in skillet. Remove pan from oven, reduce heat to 400 degrees. Place chicken and potatoes in the hot dish. Coat all with some of the olive oil in the pan. Sprinkle all with salt, pepper, basil, and oregano. Cover and bake for approximately 35 minutes or chicken reaches 165 degrees. Serve with buttered, toasted french bread. Spread roasted garlic cloves over toasted bread.

KaylaMillar
by Kayla on Mar. 28, 2011 at 1:03 PM

 that sounds SOO good!! 

Quoting lori57703:

The joke in my house is that garlic goes in everything I cook except pancakes! I love it however I can get it. Here is one of my favorite and really easy recipes:

Garlic Roasted Chicken and Red Potatoes

For each serving:

1 bonless/skinless chicken breast

2 small red potatoes, halved or quartered

1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves (each fairly large), pealed but left whole

1/2 tsp. each of dried basil and oregano

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Coat baking dish large enough to hold all of chicken, potatoes, and garlic with olive oil. Place peeled garlic cloves in dish and coat with olive oil. Place pan in hot oven for 10 minutes. While garlic is roasting wash, dry and slice potatoes. If desired season chicken breasts with salt and pepper and quickly brown in skillet. Remove pan from oven, reduce heat to 400 degrees. Place chicken and potatoes in the hot dish. Coat all with some of the olive oil in the pan. Sprinkle all with salt, pepper, basil, and oregano. Cover and bake for approximately 35 minutes or chicken reaches 165 degrees. Serve with buttered, toasted french bread. Spread roasted garlic cloves over toasted bread.

 

KaylaMillar
by Kayla on Mar. 28, 2011 at 1:03 PM

we use garlic in a lot too!!   

delanna6two
by Ruby Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 1:41 PM

I use garlic powder....Mostly to make garlic toast for spaghetti nights.

Quick Garlic Toast
Loaf Bread
Margarine (melted)
Garlic Powder
Parmesan Cheese (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 on broil.   Melt margarine in microwave or on stovetop.  Place bread in pan and spread melted margarine over each slice.  Sprinkle with garlic powder (and Parmesan Cheese if desired)  Place in oven until toasted.

melissa632
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 2:40 PM
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