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Hard-anodized or porcelain-enamel cookware set?

Posted by on May. 10, 2011 at 8:06 PM
  • 6 Replies

Which do you prefer and why?

I ask because I have the chance to get this hard-anodized set for less than $115 at Kohl's tomorrow. On the other hand, I totally love Rachael Ray's product line (have tons of bakeware), and this porcelain enamel 10-piece set would be no more than $100 with my discounts.

I really don't like the last nonstick set I bought in 2003 (it didn't hold up well; I think it's T-Fal), but that was nonstick enamel, and some of the black surface chipped/peeled off. So I thought maybe a hard-anodized set would be better, but I've never used one before.

(Oh, and I already have a nice Calphalon stainless-steel set. I want to replace my nonstick set.)

What are your thoughts? Is either worth the money? What type of cookware do you prefer to use?

by on May. 10, 2011 at 8:06 PM
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Replies (1-6):
epoh
by on May. 11, 2011 at 5:51 AM
I have the green pan and it's held up well the last year. It's non-stick. I'll probably have to replace it in another 6 mos or so. I haven't really worked with other kinds of cookware yet, besides Teflon.
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SlightlyPerfect
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2011 at 7:17 AM

Is Teflon T-Fal? (I know, that's probably a stupid question.)

Quoting epoh:

I have the green pan and it's held up well the last year. It's non-stick. I'll probably have to replace it in another 6 mos or so. I haven't really worked with other kinds of cookware yet, besides Teflon.


SweetLuci
by Luci on May. 11, 2011 at 9:06 AM

 Enameled cookware is extremely durable and its surface is sort-of non-stick, but not as good as anonidized. It's dishwasher safe, does not react with any food and usually distributes heat evenly, but can have some hot spots. I don't really like them for saute or pan frying. Metal utensils should not be used  as they can chip the enamel, as can banging against something in dishwasher, or dropping, so you need to take care.. Lighter colored enamels may stain depending on the food cooked. Use caution on glass or ceramic cook tops, as they can cause scratches.Allow the cookware to cool completely before washing with hot soapy water and a sponge or nylon scrubber. Metallic pads or abrasive cleaning  materials should not be used as they may damage the enamel

The surface of hard-anodized cookware is much harder than steel, so it is durable and resistant to chips and cracks. Its lightweight, compared to other metal pots and pans.Aluminum provides excellent heat conductivity, which makes for an evenly heated surface compared to other metal.The non-stick surface of hard-anodized cookware will not deteriorate, like many other non-stick pans. Another benefit of hard-anodized cookware is its  dark finish, making it more stain resistant. Should not be put in dishwasher, as over time,  the detergent can stain the non-stick surface, and pit the outside-same as with stainless steel. The handles can be hot, so best to have a heatproof handle.

I have both, and only use the enamel for things like soup or vegetables, something with lots of liquid. They're really pretty. I use the hard anodized for everything.   




SlightlyPerfect
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2011 at 9:53 AM

Based on what you say and what I've read, it sounds like I'm getting the anodized ones today.

Thanks!

Quoting SweetLuci:

 Enameled cookware is extremely durable and its surface is sort-of non-stick, but not as good as anonidized. It's dishwasher safe, does not react with any food and usually distributes heat evenly, but can have some hot spots. I don't really like them for saute or pan frying. Metal utensils should not be used  as they can chip the enamel, as can banging against something in dishwasher, or dropping, so you need to take care.. Lighter colored enamels may stain depending on the food cooked. Use caution on glass or ceramic cook tops, as they can cause scratches.Allow the cookware to cool completely before washing with hot soapy water and a sponge or nylon scrubber. Metallic pads or abrasive cleaning  materials should not be used as they may damage the enamel

The surface of hard-anodized cookware is much harder than steel, so it is durable and resistant to chips and cracks. Its lightweight, compared to other metal pots and pans.Aluminum provides excellent heat conductivity, which makes for an evenly heated surface compared to other metal.The non-stick surface of hard-anodized cookware will not deteriorate, like many other non-stick pans. Another benefit of hard-anodized cookware is its  dark finish, making it more stain resistant. Should not be put in dishwasher, as over time,  the detergent can stain the non-stick surface, and pit the outside-same as with stainless steel. The handles can be hot, so best to have a heatproof handle.

I have both, and only use the enamel for things like soup or vegetables, something with lots of liquid. They're really pretty. I use the hard anodized for everything.   





gypsy30
by on May. 11, 2011 at 9:58 AM

I buy T-Fal and I love them.  In fact, I just bought another pot yesterday.  If you use anything other than plastic utensils, they will get beat up.  I like them because they're so easy to clean.  That's just my preference.

KamsOne
by Jen on May. 11, 2011 at 10:02 AM

 Great info!  I'm looking for new cookware also but really don't have the room for it.  :(

Quoting SweetLuci:

 Enameled cookware is extremely durable and its surface is sort-of non-stick, but not as good as anonidized. It's dishwasher safe, does not react with any food and usually distributes heat evenly, but can have some hot spots. I don't really like them for saute or pan frying. Metal utensils should not be used  as they can chip the enamel, as can banging against something in dishwasher, or dropping, so you need to take care.. Lighter colored enamels may stain depending on the food cooked. Use caution on glass or ceramic cook tops, as they can cause scratches.Allow the cookware to cool completely before washing with hot soapy water and a sponge or nylon scrubber. Metallic pads or abrasive cleaning  materials should not be used as they may damage the enamel

The surface of hard-anodized cookware is much harder than steel, so it is durable and resistant to chips and cracks. Its lightweight, compared to other metal pots and pans.Aluminum provides excellent heat conductivity, which makes for an evenly heated surface compared to other metal.The non-stick surface of hard-anodized cookware will not deteriorate, like many other non-stick pans. Another benefit of hard-anodized cookware is its  dark finish, making it more stain resistant. Should not be put in dishwasher, as over time,  the detergent can stain the non-stick surface, and pit the outside-same as with stainless steel. The handles can be hot, so best to have a heatproof handle.

I have both, and only use the enamel for things like soup or vegetables, something with lots of liquid. They're really pretty. I use the hard anodized for everything.   




 

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