Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

How do you brine a turkey?

Posted by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 2:47 PM
  • 12 Replies
Is it like it sounds? Do you just submerse it in a pan with water a spices? What do you use in your brine?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 2:47 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Undomesticated
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 2:52 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes, that's basically what you're doing.  I use mace, kosher salt, pepper, cloves...and various other seasonings.  Just depends on my mood and what seasonings I have in the house at the time.

I usually brine it in my cooler.  It's the only thing I have big enough to fit my turkeys in :).  Plus, I live in Vermont, so I can usually just throw the cooler outside in the snow overnight and it'll stay cold.

SweetLuci
by Luci on Nov. 9, 2011 at 2:54 PM

 This will work for up to an 18 lbs turkey, for larger, increse amounts.

Brining turkey

1 gallon vegetable broth

1 cup sea salt

1 tablespoon crushed dried rosemary

1 tablespoon dried sage

1 tablespoon dried thyme

1 tablespoon dried savory

1 gallon ice water
In a large stock pot, combine the vegetable broth, sea salt, rosemary, sage, thyme, and savory. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently to be sure salt is dissolved. Remove from heat, and let cool to room temperature.

When the broth mixture is cool, pour it into a clean 5 gallon bucket. Stir in the ice water.

Wash and dry your turkey. Make sure you have removed the innards. Place the turkey, breast down, into the brine. Make sure that the cavity gets filled. Place the bucket in the refrigerator overnight.

Remove the turkey carefully draining off the excess brine and pat dry. Discard excess brine.

Cook the turkey as desired reserving the drippings for gravy. Keep in mind that brined turkeys cook 20 to 30 minutes faster so watch the temperature gauge.

kathislove80
by on Nov. 9, 2011 at 6:51 PM
Why do you brine a turkey? Just for flavor, or moisture? Just wondering, as I have never cooked a whole turkey on my own, or brined one.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
amonkeymom
by on Nov. 13, 2011 at 11:08 PM

Both.... a brined turkey is very flavorful and extremely moist. 

Quoting kathislove80:

Why do you brine a turkey? Just for flavor, or moisture? Just wondering, as I have never cooked a whole turkey on my own, or brined one.


elijahsmama09
by on Nov. 14, 2011 at 7:43 PM

Alton Browns. This is amazing:

Ingredients
1 (14 to 16 pound) frozen young turkey
For the brine:
1 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1 gallon vegetable stock
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
1 1/2 teaspoons allspice berries
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped candied ginger
1 gallon heavily iced water
For the aromatics:
1 red apple, sliced
1/2 onion, sliced
1 cinnamon stick
1 cup water
4 sprigs rosemary
6 leaves sage
Canola oil
Directions
Click here to see how it's done.

2 to 3 days before roasting:

Begin thawing the turkey in the refrigerator or in a cooler kept at 38 degrees F.

Combine the vegetable stock, salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, allspice berries, and candied ginger in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Stir occasionally to dissolve solids and bring to a boil. Then remove the brine from the heat, cool to room temperature, and refrigerate.

Early on the day or the night before you'd like to eat:

Combine the brine, water and ice in the 5-gallon bucket. Place the thawed turkey (with innards removed) breast side down in brine. If necessary, weigh down the bird to ensure it is fully immersed, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area for 8 to 16 hours, turning the bird once half way through brining.

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Remove the bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard the brine.

Place the bird on roasting rack inside a half sheet pan and pat dry with paper towels.

Combine the apple, onion, cinnamon stick, and 1 cup of water in a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 5 minutes. Add steeped aromatics to the turkey's cavity along with the rosemary and sage. Tuck the wings underneath the bird and coat the skin liberally with canola oil.

Roast the turkey on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F for 30 minutes. Insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Set the thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees F. A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting. Let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil or a large mixing bowl for 15 minutes before carving.


 

taKENheart
by on Nov. 14, 2011 at 8:46 PM

 I've never brined a turkey. Looks like you've gotten some good help ;)  I just don't know where and in what I could brine one in.  It won't be cold enough to stick it in a cooler outside and my refrigerator isn't big enough at all. I may have to try it with a cornish hen LOL

Mommy2TwinGirls
by on Nov. 14, 2011 at 8:52 PM
This is the reason I have never done it. There would never be enough room in my fridge and even in Buffalo where I live it isnt always cold enough to throw it outside.

Quoting taKENheart:

 I've never brined a turkey. Looks like you've gotten some good help ;)  I just don't know where and in what I could brine one in.  It won't be cold enough to stick it in a cooler outside and my refrigerator isn't big enough at all. I may have to try it with a cornish hen LOL

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
taKENheart
by on Nov. 14, 2011 at 9:01 PM

 I have a hard enough time fitting in the turkey after it's cooked and I pre-make cold sides so there is no way I can do it in my fridge.  Possibly for christmas I can so if it's snowy then I may try it then ;)  Otherwise, darn it, I will just have to do it to a cornish hen or the absolute smallest turkey I can find :)

Quoting Mommy2TwinGirls:

This is the reason I have never done it. There would never be enough room in my fridge and even in Buffalo where I live it isnt always cold enough to throw it outside.

Quoting taKENheart:

 I've never brined a turkey. Looks like you've gotten some good help ;)  I just don't know where and in what I could brine one in.  It won't be cold enough to stick it in a cooler outside and my refrigerator isn't big enough at all. I may have to try it with a cornish hen LOL

 

periwinkle163
by on Nov. 14, 2011 at 9:20 PM

 I've always wanted to try that but haven't yet.

AmosFarkle
by on Nov. 15, 2011 at 9:15 AM

The cooler idea is great!  Looks like you could add some ice if it doesn't stay cold enough, but I would think that since it's only overnight it would be fine.  I was glad to see Alton put some sugar in his, 'cause that's what I do.  I use sugar, salt, and a bunch of fresh herbs (bouqet garne' - sp?) tied up in cheesecloth or a coffee filter.  Whatever's out in the produce section, like rosemary, thyme, sage, etc.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)