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Recipes for Busy Moms Recipes for Busy Moms

Sigh...another bread machine question

Posted by on Apr. 27, 2012 at 5:58 PM
  • 8 Replies

 Ok, so i have made dough twice, once for pizza and today for rolls. But when the dough is done its way to sticky to handle. Is this normal? Should I add a little flour when I am handling it? I tried that with the rolls but they were still miserable to handle. Suggestions??

by on Apr. 27, 2012 at 5:58 PM
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Replies (1-8):
Kimberly954
by on Apr. 27, 2012 at 7:47 PM

 Boooo, they came out WAY overdone.

periwinkle163
by Mandy on Apr. 27, 2012 at 7:48 PM

 I haven't tried the dough setting yet. I really want to try pizza dough.

taKENheart
by Silver Member on Apr. 28, 2012 at 11:38 AM

 I've only made dough for pizza and soft pretzels.  I have never tried to make rolls.  Good luck on the next batch and I hope you get some good advice ;)

goddess99
by Michelle on Apr. 28, 2012 at 4:24 PM

Sorry it's not working out for you. I would add more flour but here's a BUMP. Hopefully someone who knows can help you.

Kimberly954
by on Apr. 28, 2012 at 4:53 PM

 My pizza dough came out really sticky too. Do you have a problem with that??

Quoting taKENheart:

 I've only made dough for pizza and soft pretzels.  I have never tried to make rolls.  Good luck on the next batch and I hope you get some good advice ;)

 

delanna6two
by Ruby Member on Apr. 29, 2012 at 11:07 PM

Hope you find something that helps...

Here's a site that I googled that has bread machine tips:
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/Secrets.htm

3. The most important hint or tip! Learn to read your dough. Don't be afraid to open the lid to check how your dough is doing. It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add flour a tablespoon at a time. The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time). If you can't judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch.


4.
Another secret is not to always flour the surface on which you form the dough (unless you have a very sticky dough). Instead, lightly oil the work surface to prevent the dough from sticking. It is often the case that one uses too much flour on the work surface and, since dough that has risen will not accept any more flour, the excess flour used on the work surface just toughens the bread. I spray lightly in one spot and use my hands to spread it over the entire work surface. It's a sure bet that oiling your work surface will produce wonderful rolls and loaves of bread.

To oil the surface, you can either use oil or a nonstick cooking spray. If you wish, flavored oils may also be used, provided they are compatible with your bread. The nonstick cooking sprays should be used carefully, since it is easy to spray them unevenly.


KaylaMillar
by Kayla on Apr. 30, 2012 at 12:25 PM
My pizza dough come out fine but I did make a calzone dough in there before and it was soo sticky!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Kimberly954
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 1:46 PM

 Ah, thanks for the tips!

Quoting delanna6two:

Hope you find something that helps...

Here's a site that I googled that has bread machine tips:
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Bread/Secrets.htm

3. The most important hint or tip! Learn to read your dough. Don't be afraid to open the lid to check how your dough is doing. It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add flour a tablespoon at a time. The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time). If you can't judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch.


4.
Another secret is not to always flour the surface on which you form the dough (unless you have a very sticky dough). Instead, lightly oil the work surface to prevent the dough from sticking. It is often the case that one uses too much flour on the work surface and, since dough that has risen will not accept any more flour, the excess flour used on the work surface just toughens the bread. I spray lightly in one spot and use my hands to spread it over the entire work surface. It's a sure bet that oiling your work surface will produce wonderful rolls and loaves of bread.

To oil the surface, you can either use oil or a nonstick cooking spray. If you wish, flavored oils may also be used, provided they are compatible with your bread. The nonstick cooking sprays should be used carefully, since it is easy to spray them unevenly.

 

 

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