Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Recipes for Busy Moms Recipes for Busy Moms

Aioli

SlightlyPerfect
Report
Some people are nothing more than examples of what _not_ to be; they're breathing testimonies of what mediocrity and worthlessness can produce.
Tuesday at 7:37 PM
Posted by on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:10 PM
  • 14 Replies

I really want to make a lemon-ginger aioli over garlic toast and coupled with steamed mussels tomorrow afternoon, but I am so nervous about working with raw eggs.

Anyone have experience with aioli? Any advice? I'm going to try it regardless, but I would like some personal pointers if anyone has them.

slightlyperfect

by on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:10 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
ZsMommy
Report
Is it Saturday yet? I want to sleep in! (lol)
Yesterday at 5:19 AM
by Bronze Member on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:14 PM

Never made one-but aren't you supposed to temper the eggs over a bowl of warm water as you whisk the eggs and oil n stuff?

ZsMommy
Report
Is it Saturday yet? I want to sleep in! (lol)
Yesterday at 5:19 AM
by Bronze Member on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:16 PM

Here-I found you a vid on how to make one...


SlightlyPerfect
Report
Some people are nothing more than examples of what _not_ to be; they're breathing testimonies of what mediocrity and worthlessness can produce.
Tuesday at 7:37 PM
by Bronze Member on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:17 PM

Thanks. I've seen that, but I am still nervous.

Maybe if I go to the local farm tomorrow and get the freshest eggs, I'll feel better. :) This is a surprise for DH for a kid-free evening, so I don't want to kill us.

Quoting ZsMommy:

Here-I found you a vid on how to make one...



slightlyperfect

ZsMommy
Report
Is it Saturday yet? I want to sleep in! (lol)
Yesterday at 5:19 AM
by Bronze Member on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:20 PM

Found this too-I highlighted in red...

How To Make Mayonnaise, Aioli and Their Derivatives

Like many of the mother sauces, a well made mayonnaise is the base to an endless possibility of cold, emulsified sauces. Although now days there are many good quality commercial mayonnaise available, understanding how to make a mayonnaise is basic knowledge that every cook or chef should have. Not to mention, that with the selection and use of high quality products, fresh made mayonnaise can have a far superior flavor to that of its commercial counterparts.

Some Guidelines for Making Mayonnaise

  • Use a blender, food processor or a KitchenAid with a whisk attachment. Not only will it insure that your arm doesn’t fall off from hand whisking, but the shearing power of these devices is capable of breaking the oil into much smaller droplets, making a more stable emulsion.
  • Have both your egg yolks and oil at room temperature before starting. It will make the emulsification process much easier.
  • Use the freshest eggs possible, preferably organic from a farmer’s market. If cooking for children or the elderly, pasteurized egg yolks are always recommended.

Standard Ratio for Mayonnaise

At it’s most basic level, mayonnaise is simply a neutral oil emulsified into egg yolks. The ratio for a basic mayonnaise is:

  • 1 yolk per 1 cup of neutral oil (canola, safflower, grape seed).

Although many classical recipes call for the addition of other ingredients, egg yolks and oil are all you need to make a mayonnaise. Some additional ingredients that are used to season mayonnaise are:

  • Vinegar
  • Salt
  • Pepper (usually white)
  • Dry Mustard
  • Cayenne Pepper
  • Lemon Juice

Standard Recipe For 2 Cups of Mayonnaise

  1. 2 egg yolks
  2. 1/2 table spoon of vinegar
  3. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  4. 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
  5. Small Pinch cayenne
  6. 2 cups Salad Oil (canola preferred)
  7. 1 Tablespoon Vinegar
  8. 1-2 Tablespoons Lemon Juice
  • Put ingredients 1-5 into a blender, food processor or KitchenAid with a whisk attachment and mix well.
  • Very slowly at first, start streaming in your oil, a little at a time until your emulsification starts to form.
  • Use the 1 tablespoon of vinegar to thin the mayonnaise if it starts to become too thick before the emulsification is complete.
  • Once all the oil is incorporated into egg yolks and the mayonnaise is finished, it should be thick enough to be turned upside down without the mayonnaise coming out of the mixing container.
  • Adjust the final seasoning with the lemon juice, salt and pepper (white, cayenne or black pepper depending on preference).

What’s The Difference Between Mayonnaise and Aioli

A common question asked is what’s the difference between mayonnaise and aioli. Now days, the term aioli has been bastardized by some chefs to be synonymous with any flavored mayonnaise. However, there is an exacting classical distinction between mayonnaise and aioli.

The difference between mayonnaise and aioli is the simple fact that aioli is made with extra virgin olive oil and has the addition of crushed garlic. So to make aioli, follow the standard recipe above, but instead, substitute the canola oil for extra virgin olive oil and add 1 tablespoon of fresh minced garlic to the egg yolks during the blending/beating process.

The simplified ratio for Aioli is:

  • 1 egg yolk + 1 cup extra virgin olive oil + 1 teaspoon of crushed garlic = Aioli.
  • This ratio can be simply seasoned with lemon juice, salt and pepper to yield a simple and traditional Aioli.

Mayonnaise Based Sauces

As stated before, mayonnaise is a great base to use for making other unique sauces. One of my all time favorite cook books “Charcuterie” by Michael Rhulman and Brian Polcyn, makes these suggestions:

  • For Pork try adding some cumin, cayenne and lime juice.
  • For Fish add saffron and garlic.
  • For Chicken add lemon juice and tarragon.
  • For Beef add a little fresh horse radish (I would also recommend some fresh chopped chives).

Another very traditional mayonnaise based sauce is Remoulade which is traditionally served with fish. To make a traditional remoulade you will need:

  • 2 Cups of Mayonnaise
  • About 1 tablespoon of good Dijon
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped cornichons (Tiny, French, Sweet Pickles)
  • Tablespoon chopped capers
  • 1 anchovy fillet, finely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons chopped parsey
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh chervil
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon

Mix all ingredients together and serve with fish. This is a great dipping sauce for fish and chips!

To make other mayonnaise based sauces, start with 2 cups of freshly made or neutral store bought mayonnaise and add:

  • Thousand Island Dressing: 1/2 cup chili sauce, 1/2 ounce minced onion, 1 ounce finely chopped green pepper, 1 ounce drained pimiento.
  • Louis Dressing: same as Thousand Island with the addition of 1/2 cup heavy cream.
  • Russian Dressing: 1/2 cup chili sauce or catsup, 1 ounce fresh horseradish, 1.2 ounce minced onion.
  • Chantilly: 1/2 cup of heavy creamed whipped until a stiff peak and added in just before service.
  • Blue Cheese Dressing: substitute one cup of mayonnaise for one cup of sour cream (optional but really good), add 1 ounce white vinegar, /2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, 4 ounces crumbled bleu cheese; thin with 1-2 cups heavy cream, half and half or buttermilk.
  • Ranch Dressing: 1 1/2 cups sour cream, 1/2 cup buttermilk, 2 ounces wine vinegar of your choice, 1/2 ounce lemon juice, 1/2 ounce Worcestershire sauce, 2 Tablespoons chopped parsley, 1 tablespoon chopped chives, 1-2 crushed garlic cloves, 1 scallion (green onion) finely chopped, 2 teaspoons celeryseed.
SlightlyPerfect
Report
Some people are nothing more than examples of what _not_ to be; they're breathing testimonies of what mediocrity and worthlessness can produce.
Tuesday at 7:37 PM
by Bronze Member on Aug. 2, 2012 at 10:32 PM

OMG, what the hell are pasteurized egg yolks? I've never heard of that.

slightlyperfect

lifesbliss
by on Aug. 3, 2012 at 9:47 AM

go really slow with the oil.  Drop by drop until it starts to thicken, then you can go a bit faster. And unless you have serious whisking muscles, use a mixer or food processor.

KaylaMillar
by Kayla on Aug. 3, 2012 at 11:46 AM
I've never heard of it before
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SweetLuci
by Luci on Aug. 3, 2012 at 12:33 PM

 Yes.

Quoting lifesbliss:

go really slow with the oil.  Drop by drop until it starts to thicken, then you can go a bit faster. And unless you have serious whisking muscles, use a mixer or food processor.

 

SweetLuci
by Luci on Aug. 3, 2012 at 12:36 PM

Have you made mayonnaise before? Basically same thing, but you must use olive oil and garlic. Go for it...you'll do fine.

SweetLuci
by Luci on Aug. 3, 2012 at 12:37 PM

 You only have to worry about the raw egg with young children, frail elderly or anyone with a compromised immunity system.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)