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Coloring Easter Eggs a new way.

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 4:44 PM
  • 17 Replies

 Marbleized Easter Eggs:

Introduction

Nestle each of your marbleized eggs in its own bed of grass. Using cardboard dividers, create 12 compartments in a shallow box or an empty shirt carton, then fashion a snug nest of dried grass inside each square. Save the lid for storage.

You'll need:

  • Egg blower
  • 12 eggs
  • Several mixing bowls, shallow and deep
  • Measuring spoons
  • Liquid measuring cup
  • White vinegar
  • Food coloring
  • Spoon and fork
  • Olive oil
  • Paper towels
  • Step 1

    With an egg blower, pierce the top and bottom of each egg, puncturing the yolk; carefully expel the contents. Rinse, and let dry.

    Step 2

    In a small mixing bowl, combine 3 cups warm water, 2 tablespoons vinegar, and a few drops of food coloring. Place egg in dye, and leave it submerged until it turns the desired shade.

    Step 3

    In a wide, shallow bowl, prepare a second batch of dye -- which will provide the swirls -- in a darker shade or a different color. Liquid should be 1/2 inch deep. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil. Run a fork through this mixture, creating curlicues of oil on the surface.

    Step 4

    As oil swirls, place dyed egg in mixture, and roll it once around the bowl to pick up oil streaks; remove the egg.

    Step 5

    Gently pat egg with a paper towel.

    Step 6

    Let it dry. You can experiment with color combinations: Vary the base tints and the swirls to achieve striking contrasts, subtle shadings, or multihued richness.

    by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 4:44 PM
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    Replies (1-10):
    Bmat
    by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 8:43 PM

    Thank you for the article. The results are a lot like the eggs that I still have that I did years ago using a kit that came with bright paints- I'd say acrylic or laquer- that you dipped and swirled as described above. The eggs stayed shiny. A disadvantage was that the paint had to be removed from wherever it splashed by using a paint thinner.  I didn't know there was something like an egg blower. I poked holes in the eggs, broke the yolk, and blew them out. After blowing out a dozen eggs I couldn't bear to think of cooking up and eating the egg. 

    AM-BRAT
    by on Feb. 22, 2010 at 1:10 AM

    Thank you!

    AM-BRAT
    by on Feb. 22, 2010 at 1:10 AM

    Interesting, BMAT...

    bhwrn1
    by on Feb. 22, 2010 at 1:23 PM

     This is really neat!

    kmrtigger
    by on Feb. 22, 2010 at 8:19 PM

     We did something like this in our art class in JR High. I didn't like the yolk blowing part either.

    kindhartmomma
    by on Feb. 25, 2010 at 9:21 AM

     Ok I have never ever heard of an egg blower. what in the world is that and why do you need one?

    Ibelongtojesus
    by on Feb. 25, 2010 at 9:57 AM

    I actually purchased one of these kits last year.  It was very easy.

     

    Kmakksmom
    by on Feb. 25, 2010 at 6:58 PM

    Those are really cool!  We may have to try that this year, thanks for the article :)

    summerdayz
    by on Feb. 26, 2010 at 7:39 PM

    Thanks, I'm gonna try this !  They are beautiful eggs !   :)

                                  
                         

    Peajewel
    by on Mar. 5, 2010 at 2:23 AM

    Wow! I really like this, we may have to try it!  Thanks!

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