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WWYD- Email from the teacher?

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My friend just got an email from her son's high school English teacher and it has several grammatical errors. He misused colons. He ended a sentence with a period and then an exclamation mark. He also used the wrong verb tense. 

No to mention that email was pretty rude. The teacher obviously felt the parent was accusing him of losing her son's assignments but the email she sent didn't say that at all. So not only can the guy not write, he can't read. 

She's torn because nothing he's sent home has had errors like that. She wonders if he doesn't consider email a formal form of writing so he typed it out without rereading or thinking. Obviously many people feel that way about online communication. (Just look at all the posts on CM written in text speak) 

Do you think teachers should be formal when emailing parents?

by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 9:19 AM
Replies (31-40):
SarahSuzyQ
by Sarah on Jan. 21, 2013 at 8:04 AM
1 mom liked this
I knew a guy who was a certified secondary English teacher who was terrible with grammar. Apparently it's no longer important in our educational system. Makes me crazy.

What exactly would be the response she wants to send? Just to call him out on poor grammar? I'm not sure what it would accomplish...
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amyjane22
by Amy on Jan. 21, 2013 at 8:56 AM
Ideally, he should use proper grammar and punctuation always, but I wouldn't make a huge deal out of it. He was probably rushed when sending the email.

I would be more concerned with the rude attitude. However, maybe your friend should reread her email to be sure her email couldn't have been taken the wrong way as well.
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elasmimi
by Ruby Member on Jan. 21, 2013 at 8:58 AM

this

Quoting tyfry7496:

Let it go this time but I would save it to have proof if you need to go to the principal.

And, yes, teachers should use proper English in emails.


maxswolfsuit
by on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:09 AM


Quoting Threes.Company:

Are they sure it was actually written by the teacher? I'd call for verification. Sounds fishy.

Who else could it have been from? It was from his email address. She spoke to him on the phone and he mentioned the email so he did write it. 

Why do you think it's fishy?

maxswolfsuit
by on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:11 AM


Quoting amyjane22:

Ideally, he should use proper grammar and punctuation always, but I wouldn't make a huge deal out of it. He was probably rushed when sending the email.

I would be more concerned with the rude attitude. However, maybe your friend should reread her email to be sure her email couldn't have been taken the wrong way as well.

That's actually why I know about all this. She asked me to read it to make sure she didn't come across rude. I read hers before reading the teacher's reply and can't see how it could come across as rude. She was basically making sure her son wasn't lying to her. She wasn't blaming the teacher at all. 

maxswolfsuit
by on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:12 AM

If she brings it the principal's attention it could accomplish something. If the principal is as appalled as I am he will do something about it. 

Quoting SarahSuzyQ:

I knew a guy who was a certified secondary English teacher who was terrible with grammar. Apparently it's no longer important in our educational system. Makes me crazy.

What exactly would be the response she wants to send? Just to call him out on poor grammar? I'm not sure what it would accomplish...
LifeCafe42
by on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:14 AM
Agreed

Quoting hugss:

I too would let it go this time,
However I definiely feel teachers need to write *professionally* even in emails :)

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Kris_PBG
by on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:15 AM
I would expect a communication from a teacher to a parent to be professional.

I would not bring it to the principal based on "grammar police" charges, but it would certainly shape my opinion, expectations and dealings with this person.
SarahSuzyQ
by Sarah on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:17 AM

Eh. My guess is it will cause more issues between her kid and the teacher than actually getting anything done. The principal isn't likely to take any disciplinary action against a teacher because of a misspelled email.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

If she brings it the principal's attention it could accomplish something. If the principal is as appalled as I am he will do something about it. 

Quoting SarahSuzyQ:

I knew a guy who was a certified secondary English teacher who was terrible with grammar. Apparently it's no longer important in our educational system. Makes me crazy.

What exactly would be the response she wants to send? Just to call him out on poor grammar? I'm not sure what it would accomplish...



maxswolfsuit
by on Jan. 21, 2013 at 9:21 AM

It wasn't just misspelling. It was misused punctuation and verb tense. If it was just a typo or two I wouldn't feel the same way. But the mistakes he made were pretty serious. 

I agree that it could cause problems with the teacher. But I think that's why some high school teachers get away with so much. It's a tough call. 

Quoting SarahSuzyQ:

Eh. My guess is it will cause more issues between her kid and the teacher than actually getting anything done. The principal isn't likely to take any disciplinary action against a teacher because of a misspelled email.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

If she brings it the principal's attention it could accomplish something. If the principal is as appalled as I am he will do something about it. 

Quoting SarahSuzyQ:

I knew a guy who was a certified secondary English teacher who was terrible with grammar. Apparently it's no longer important in our educational system. Makes me crazy.

What exactly would be the response she wants to send? Just to call him out on poor grammar? I'm not sure what it would accomplish...




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