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i get not wanting your child labeled but.....

Posted by on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:12 AM
  • 75 Replies
1 mom liked this

 i helped out at a camp my children did this past week.  one of the boys at the camp was very hard to keep in line.  to keep focused, on task, etc.  1/2 the time he showed no interest in the camp & didn't seem to listen but when we got him to focus he did wonderful at what ever the task was.  me & the other teachers had no idea how to handle him.  wasn't till wednesday when his mom picked him up (dad had been dropping off & picking up) that we found out the boy was highly autistic.  we all kinda thought it was something like that but since we didn't know we didn't really know how to approach him.  after talking to mom & finding out all of his "little quirks" the last two days of camp went really well for him & us adults.  when his mom came to the performance yesterday she told us how much her son had enjoyed the week (not an impression we got from the first 3 days) & how she loved how we were with him during the performance.  he hates crowds & wouldn't get up in front of the parents to perform so i sat off to the side of the stage with him (where his mom could see him), playing whistle & singing along with him. 

all the things we did with him the last two days to keep him focused & engaged we couldn't have done if we had never found out that he was autistic, if we hadn't found out about all his "quirks".

so while i do get why parents don't like to label their children, they do need to inform the people looking after their child, spending several hours a day with them, of any issues they may have.  you'd tell a caretaker about any allergies so why not tell them about everything?

by on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:12 AM
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Replies (1-10):
MistressMinerva
by Silver Member on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:20 AM

They should tell those things.

Rhodin
by Member on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:23 AM
I'm pretty sure that when I drop DD4 off with a binderful of picture cards, 2 complete changes of clothes, a journal describing her mood that morning, and an illustrated schedule that includes bathroom breaks, the "A" word probably needs not be said. I still warn people, though.
lizzig
by Ruby Member on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:25 AM

 aww!  what a organized mama you are!  yes, i'd get the hint with all those clues!  sadly though we didn't have any indication from dad there were any issues.  thankfully mom didn't have the same line of thinking as dad when it came to informing others.

Quoting Rhodin: I'm pretty sure that when I drop DD4 off with a binderful of picture cards, 2 complete changes of clothes, a journal describing her mood that morning, and an illustrated schedule that includes bathroom breaks, the "A" word probably needs not be said. I still warn people, though.

 

SweetLuci
by Luci on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:27 AM
2 moms liked this

 They are doing the child, and the caregivers, a disservice if they don't inform them.

lizzig
by Ruby Member on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:31 AM

 i completely agree! i could tell such a difference in the little boy the last two days.  once we knew all the important info we were better able to make the camp experience more fun for him.

Quoting SweetLuci:

 They are doing the child, and the caregivers, a disservice if they don't inform them.

 

SweetLuci
by Luci on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:34 AM

 I can understand that.

Quoting lizzig:

 i completely agree! i could tell such a difference in the little boy the last two days.  once we knew all the important info we were better able to make the camp experience more fun for him.

Quoting SweetLuci:

 They are doing the child, and the caregivers, a disservice if they don't inform them.

 

 

Aqua_Jen
by Gold Member on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:47 AM
Parents should always disclose any special needs for their child. We have been working for a year and a half to figure out what is going on with our son. We always give caregivers a heads up on what his "quirks" are but without a diagnosis people just think hes a punk. It's really frustrating for all parties involved.
charlene_kyle
by Charlene on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:48 AM

 

Quoting SweetLuci:

 They are doing the child, and the caregivers, a disservice if they don't inform them.

 

lizzig
by Ruby Member on Jun. 14, 2014 at 10:54 AM

 i can understand that frustration.  my son struggles with reading & writing.  i believe he has some form of dyslexia (as do others that know him & have it themselves or a child with it) but it's a long process to figure out what's going on.  when i mention this to teachers i get "has he been diagnosed?" & then when i say we are going through testing i get "well we can't really treat him as such without a diagnosis!"  so in the meantime he sits in class & struggles because they won't work with him without a diagnosis.

Quoting Aqua_Jen: Parents should always disclose any special needs for their child. We have been working for a year and a half to figure out what is going on with our son. We always give caregivers a heads up on what his "quirks" are but without a diagnosis people just think hes a punk. It's really frustrating for all parties involved.

 

SweetLuci
by Luci on Jun. 14, 2014 at 11:01 AM

 That's upsetting. You would think caregivers would appreciate getting the information. I know I would in that situation.

Quoting Aqua_Jen: Parents should always disclose any special needs for their child. We have been working for a year and a half to figure out what is going on with our son. We always give caregivers a heads up on what his "quirks" are but without a diagnosis people just think hes a punk. It's really frustrating for all parties involved.

 

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