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Medal of Honor Winner

Posted by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:23 AM
  • 6 Replies

 You're a 19 year old kid.
You're critically wounded and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley.


November 11, 1965.

LZ X-ray , Vietnam .

Your infantry unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away,
that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.


You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.

Your family is 1/2 way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.


As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter.

You look up to see an unarmed Huey. But ... it doesn't seem real because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.


Ed Freeman is coming for you.


He's not Medi-Vac so it's not his job, but he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway.

Even after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He's coming anyway.


And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses.


And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!!


He took about 30 of you and your buddies out who would never have gotten out.



Medal of Honor Recipient,
Ed Freeman, died last Wednesday at the age of 80, in Boise , Idaho .

May God Rest His Soul.


I bet you didn't hear about this hero's
passing, but we've sure seen a whole bunch
about
Michael Jackson. . .



Medal of Honor Winner
Ed Freeman


Shame on the American media !!!

by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:23 AM
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Replies (1-6):
tnterri
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:42 AM


Quoting unknownjourney:

 You're a 19 year old kid.
You're critically wounded and dying in the jungle in the Ia Drang Valley.


November 11, 1965.

LZ X-ray , Vietnam .

Your infantry unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 or 200 yards away,
that your own Infantry Commander has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.


You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.

Your family is 1/2 way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.


As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter.

You look up to see an unarmed Huey. But ... it doesn't seem real because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.


Ed Freeman is coming for you.


He's not Medi-Vac so it's not his job, but he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway.

Even after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.

He's coming anyway.


And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 2 or 3 of you on board.

Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses.


And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!!


He took about 30 of you and your buddies out who would never have gotten out.



Medal of Honor Recipient,
Ed Freeman, died last Wednesday at the age of 80, in Boise , Idaho .

May God Rest His Soul.


I bet you didn't hear about this hero's
passing, but we've sure seen a whole bunch
about
Michael Jackson. . .



Medal of Honor Winner
Ed Freeman


Shame on the American media !!!

I totally agree..It is about time they reported on the real heroes....

tnterri

celticreverie
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:43 AM

I loathe propganda pieces... I really do.

But at least this one has truth to it. Ed Freeman was an amazing man, and was awarded the medel in 2001 by president bush. He is a Hero, and deserves to be recognized, although he didn't do it for hero status. He did it because it was the right thing to do.

He died August 2008 though. And his achievements were for Nov. 14 1965

Freeman's official Medal of Honor citation reads:

Captain Ed W. Freeman, United States Army, distinguished himself by numerous acts of conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary intrepidity on 14 November 1965 while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). As a flight leader and second in command of a 16-helicopter lift unit, he supported a heavily engaged American infantry battalion at Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam. The unit was almost out of ammunition after taking some of the heaviest casualties of the war, fighting off a relentless attack from a highly motivated, heavily armed enemy force. When the infantry commander closed the helicopter landing zone due to intense direct enemy fire, Captain Freeman risked his own life by flying his unarmed helicopter through a gauntlet of enemy fire time after time, delivering critically needed ammunition, water and medical supplies to the besieged battalion. His flights had a direct impact on the battle's outcome by providing the engaged units with timely supplies of ammunition critical to their survival, without which they would almost surely have gone down, with much greater loss of life. After medical evacuation helicopters refused to fly into the area due to intense enemy fire, Captain Freeman flew 14 separate rescue missions, providing life-saving evacuation of an estimated 30 seriously wounded soldiers -- some of whom would not have survived had he not acted. All flights were made into a small emergency landing zone within 100 to 200 meters of the defensive perimeter where heavily committed units were perilously holding off the attacking elements. Captain Freeman's selfless acts of great valor, extraordinary perseverance and intrepidity were far above and beyond the call of duty or mission and set a superb example of leadership and courage for all of his peers. Captain Freeman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army


unknownjourney
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 7:11 AM

My point to posting this is not the date of which the man died but the fact that we hold our celebrities with such high regards just for entertaining us but the men and women who fight for us on a daily basis get condemned.

celticreverie
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 7:25 AM

I realise this, I just hate that these things can't make their point without being false. It'd be nice if an email went around that was actually true, to make a point.

Also, having spoken with military men who did remarkable things (my great grandfather was a POW in Stalag 17) they don't do it for recognition, and to be awarded for something they don't believe to be miraculous is a bit embarrassing.

I think you missed the point of the article as well. The men and women fighting aren't being condemned.. but those who did remarkable things may not get the same recognition as say Michael Jackson or Taylor Swift. It's a sad truth, but our country isn't all about it's military... it's about entertainment.

There may be a small portion of the US who actually condemns are military men and women.. the rest either know or don't know about the achievements of the brave men and women we have today, and throughout history.

Quoting unknownjourney:

My point to posting this is not the date of which the man died but the fact that we hold our celebrities with such high regards just for entertaining us but the men and women who fight for us on a daily basis get condemned.



unknownjourney
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 7:32 AM


Quoting celticreverie:

I realise this, I just hate that these things can't make their point without being false. It'd be nice if an email went around that was actually true, to make a point.

Also, having spoken with military men who did remarkable things (my great grandfather was a POW in Stalag 17) they don't do it for recognition, and to be awarded for something they don't believe to be miraculous is a bit embarrassing.

I think you missed the point of the article as well. The men and women fighting aren't being condemned.. but those who did remarkable things may not get the same recognition as say Michael Jackson or Taylor Swift. It's a sad truth, but our country isn't all about it's military... it's about entertainment.

There may be a small portion of the US who actually condemns are military men and women.. the rest either know or don't know about the achievements of the brave men and women we have today, and throughout history.

Quoting unknownjourney:

My point to posting this is not the date of which the man died but the fact that we hold our celebrities with such high regards just for entertaining us but the men and women who fight for us on a daily basis get condemned.


Oh No I got the point of the article. My Uncles both served in Vietnam and to this day will not talk about what they experienced cause it still bothers them. Now my two older children are in the army and may very well be placed in situations that will be difficult for them to completely wrap their minds around. When my uncle came home from the war they were treated like crap for the most part and a lot of our military men and women today are being treated the same way. This is what my point is. I have been on here many times and have read many a post about people condemning our military. I know they don't do things to be looked at as a hero. But they are heros and every so often they need a pat on their backs and a big THANKS.

fairymom2316
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 9:42 AM

That's a real hero, may he rest in peace!

Quoting celticreverie:

I loathe propganda pieces... I really do.

But at least this one has truth to it. Ed Freeman was an amazing man, and was awarded the medel in 2001 by president bush. He is a Hero, and deserves to be recognized, although he didn't do it for hero status. He did it because it was the right thing to do.

He died August 2008 though. And his achievements were for Nov. 14 1965

Freeman's official Medal of Honor citation reads:

Captain Ed W. Freeman, United States Army, distinguished himself by numerous acts of conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary intrepidity on 14 November 1965 while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). As a flight leader and second in command of a 16-helicopter lift unit, he supported a heavily engaged American infantry battalion at Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam. The unit was almost out of ammunition after taking some of the heaviest casualties of the war, fighting off a relentless attack from a highly motivated, heavily armed enemy force. When the infantry commander closed the helicopter landing zone due to intense direct enemy fire, Captain Freeman risked his own life by flying his unarmed helicopter through a gauntlet of enemy fire time after time, delivering critically needed ammunition, water and medical supplies to the besieged battalion. His flights had a direct impact on the battle's outcome by providing the engaged units with timely supplies of ammunition critical to their survival, without which they would almost surely have gone down, with much greater loss of life. After medical evacuation helicopters refused to fly into the area due to intense enemy fire, Captain Freeman flew 14 separate rescue missions, providing life-saving evacuation of an estimated 30 seriously wounded soldiers -- some of whom would not have survived had he not acted. All flights were made into a small emergency landing zone within 100 to 200 meters of the defensive perimeter where heavily committed units were perilously holding off the attacking elements. Captain Freeman's selfless acts of great valor, extraordinary perseverance and intrepidity were far above and beyond the call of duty or mission and set a superb example of leadership and courage for all of his peers. Captain Freeman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army


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