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military housing and census?

Posted by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:27 PM
  • 15 Replies

We live in off base mil housing and never received a census form..anyone else?

by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:27 PM
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Replies (1-10):
FIREFOX1336
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:35 PM

we didnt get one either.. but i thought i heard something a while ago that military wont get them. it was when they first started talking about the new census. the reason stated is they already have a head count since all dependant should be in deers and everything else they have. And i have heard they have a special way the military claims deployed troops. thats just what i heard though so dont hold me to it..

asaffell
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:37 PM

Weird, we got one and filled it out on base housing.

Quoting FIREFOX1336:

we didnt get one either.. but i thought i heard something a while ago that military wont get them. it was when they first started talking about the new census. the reason stated is they already have a head count since all dependant should be in deers and everything else they have. And i have heard they have a special way the military claims deployed troops. thats just what i heard though so dont hold me to it..


Natural childbirth has evolved to suit the species, and if mankind chooses to ignore her advice and interfere with her workings we must not complain about the consequences. We have only ourselves to blame.

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violinjewel
by Julia on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:49 PM

We didn't get one either, though my husband is in National Guard, but his unit was deployed this last year. Does that mean anything? I went on the census website, but can't find any information that is useful really.

Mikeynlexismom
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:50 PM

we live in base housing and did not get one either. 

victoriaherring
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 11:52 PM

does that mean since we are military that we don't need to fill out a census form even if we received one? (i'm referring to the statement that said they already have a headcount from deers)

FIREFOX1336
by on Apr. 2, 2010 at 12:07 AM

like i said i heard this when they first started putting comercials out about the census so it has been a little while. i am a reservist and my dh is active duty all my info is what i heard talking at drill weekend and what neighbors have said they read etc. dont hold me to anything it is just what i heard. it does seem fishy that some of us are getting them and some aren't. i think i will start googling it right now. if i find anything official i will post it here with the link. 

FIREFOX1336
by on Apr. 2, 2010 at 12:14 AM

ok i was wrong.. i admit it... here is what i found...

 

Terri Barnes

Spouse Calls

Join the conversation with Stripes columnist Terri Barnes, as she explores issues relevant to the lives of military spouses.

The Census: Military familes count

Posted March 14th, 2010 by Terri Barnes

The 2010 Census is coming up on April 1. Military families living overseas are counted automatically in their sponsor's home of record and have no forms to fill out, I learned while writing the Mar. 14 Spouse Calls column.

An Army mom living in the U.S. had a question about whether to include her son, who is stationed overseas, on her household census form. Her question appears in the Mar. 28 edition.

Spouses and families living in the U.S., even when the military member is deployed overseas, should fill out the census for for the state where they live and sleep the majority of the time, according to Robert Crockett of the U.S. Census Bureau.

For military families -- and everyone else -- living in the United States, the census requires one ten-question form, which must be completed and returned by mail. Census takers will make home visits only to those who do not complete these census forms, so the 2010 Census has mounted a $133-million publicity campaign to encourage more and earlier participation.

Naturally, taking the census in person is much more expensive than by mail. In fact, the Census Bureau estimates it could save as much as $85 million for every percentage-point increase the publicity garners in mailback response. The bureau is taking its publicity particularly seriously this year, which is probably why they were so persistent in contacting me to get the word out to militlary families.

Military members and their families living overseas don't have to fill out Census forms, because we are counted automatically using the administrative record of the Department of Defense Manpower Data Center.

The Census Bureau is using every avenue available to reach Americans with their message. Their 2010 Census Web site has fun facts for kids, has enlisted help from Dora the Explorer, and provides lesson plans for teachers.

The 2010 Census has even become a NASCAR sponsor and has connections on YouTube, twitter and Facebook. I spent more time than I care to admit looking at the page of the census Web site devoted to state demographics and trivia. I learned that the fiddle is the official musical instrument of Oklahoma; also that 8.6 million people live in New Jersey, while only 1 million live in all of Montana, among other things.

Here are some not so trivial facts about the upcoming count for those living in the U.S.:

  • Census questionnaires will not be sent via Internet or email.
  • After receiving a census form in your mailbox, you might receive an email reminder from the Census Bureau to fill out and mail in your census form. However, the Census Bureau will not request detailed personal information via email.
  • If you receive an email or find a Web site that you suspect is falsely representing the Census Bureau, do not reply, open attachments or click on any links you find there. Forward any suspicious email or links to ITSO.Fraud.Reporting@census.gov
  • The census does not ask about the legal status of respondents or request their Social Security numbers, bank account or other personal information.
  • If a census worker knocks on your door, he or she will have a badge, a handheld device, a Census Bureau canvas bag and a confidentiality notice. Ask for identification before answering any questions.
  • The Census Bureau and your father advise that you should never invite anyone you don't know into your home.
  • What if we're moving on Census Day (April 1.) Questions to these and many other questions about where you count and whom to count in your household, see the Residence Rules of the 2010 Census.

(The information for this column was provided by Robert Crockett of the U.S. Census Bureau and the 2010 Census Web site.)

 

wruss
by on Apr. 2, 2010 at 1:45 AM

I got one...and filled it out, mailed it in, and got another one, and a letter saying I didn't fill out my first one, so I need to do it again...UGH! FAIL on them....

MaoChow
by on Apr. 2, 2010 at 7:11 AM

I got one, filled it out and sent it back. Have heard nothing about it since.

Edit: I forgot to mention I live on base. Oops. Pregnant brain.

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Silonius
by on Apr. 2, 2010 at 7:17 AM

We got one and we live on base, just haven't filled it out yet.

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