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Delayed vax and surgery question

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Dd (21 mos) needs cleft palate surgery. She's getting a referral on the third but the advice nurse has said she couldn't do the surgery without all her shots. I don't want her to have some of them yet if at all, is it possible to have it done at all without every shot??
by on Jun. 16, 2012 at 6:14 PM
Replies (21-29):
4ever-SJ
by Gold Member on Jun. 17, 2012 at 2:30 PM
Do you have any first-hand experience or is your knowledge solely through education?


Quoting ripemango:

yeah, I'm ignorant on this topic....only getting a master's degree in Epidemiology.


Quoting vintage-misha:

Right... I won't debate with someone who is ignorant. It's impossible.

Quoting ripemango:

I said it's my opinion, and it is.

There are diseases/illnesses that people contract while having to stay in a hospital. Your risk goes up even as an outpatient. Some of those diseases are vaccine preventable, some are not. You can't just know what diseases are swimming around in the hospital at which her child will have surgery. Her child is at a greater risk from having to be hospitalized and not having all of the vaccinations. She should know that and why. (Sometimes nurses don't go into the details and it sounds like the one she encountered was of that type.)



Quoting vintage-misha:

Either way it is completely irrelevant to the question she asked. What you did is attack her personal choice but saying "get the damn shots" The child is not more at risk without the vaccines, that's a very ignorant assumption.

Quoting ripemango:

*sigh*

reread my post.....it's about the greater likelihood of contracting something really awful while her child is in the hospital...not vaxing in general. AT ALL


Quoting vintage-misha:

Was she asking for opinions on vaccines? Nope, so keep your damn opinion to yourself. 


Quoting ripemango:

you/one/your child is much more likely to contract something while in a hospital.

get the damn shots....but that's just my opinion








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ripemango
by on Jun. 17, 2012 at 2:53 PM

Both

My interest is immunotherapy (specifically active immunotherapies) and the effectiveness on various forms of cancer (my focus is cervical). I would *like* to go into immunotherapy and study the effectiveness on other ailments as well. However, I may not get to do exactly what I want upon graduating. That may come with time! More than likely, I will get my internship at the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center but whether I'll get to be in on immunotherapies is still up in the air.

Quoting 4ever-SJ:

Do you have any first-hand experience or is your knowledge solely through education?



I don't know where the sunbeams end and the starlights begin; it's all a mystery.

4ever-SJ
by Gold Member on Jun. 17, 2012 at 3:23 PM
2 moms liked this
That is your interest, not your experience.

I asked because of my experience as the parent of an immune-compromised child. I would presume you are knowledgeable of the work of Drs. Buckley and Markert at Duke? Yes/no? They are my son's immunologists and have never expressed a concern over the possibilities you posit.




Quoting ripemango:

Both

My interest is immunotherapy (specifically active immunotherapies) and the effectiveness on various forms of cancer (my focus is cervical). I would *like* to go into immunotherapy and study the effectiveness on other ailments as well. However, I may not get to do exactly what I want upon graduating. That may come with time! More than likely, I will get my internship at the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center but whether I'll get to be in on immunotherapies is still up in the air.


Quoting 4ever-SJ:

Do you have any first-hand experience or is your knowledge solely through education?



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ripemango
by on Jun. 17, 2012 at 3:59 PM

I was sharing my personal interest in the field because I thought you seemed interested. However, I guess I should have assumed snarkiness versus actual interest.

I never knew that some people disbelieve that one's chances of contracting an illness is increased by being in the hospital. I learn something new on CM all the time. 

An immunologist is a medical doctor specializing in the immune system that treats individual patients. Epidemiologists do not treat patients or deal with individuals. We deal with statistics, numbers, and groups of people. An immunologist is implementing current medical treatments whereas an epidemiologist is (hopefully) researching and coming up with new ones.

Best of luck w your child's condition.

Quoting 4ever-SJ:

That is your interest, not your experience.

I asked because of my experience as the parent of an immune-compromised child. I would presume you are knowledgeable of the work of Drs. Buckley and Markert at Duke? Yes/no? They are my son's immunologists and have never expressed a concern over the possibilities you posit.




Quoting ripemango:

Both

My interest is immunotherapy (specifically active immunotherapies) and the effectiveness on various forms of cancer (my focus is cervical). I would *like* to go into immunotherapy and study the effectiveness on other ailments as well. However, I may not get to do exactly what I want upon graduating. That may come with time! More than likely, I will get my internship at the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center but whether I'll get to be in on immunotherapies is still up in the air.


Quoting 4ever-SJ:

Do you have any first-hand experience or is your knowledge solely through education?





I don't know where the sunbeams end and the starlights begin; it's all a mystery.

vintage-misha
by on Jun. 17, 2012 at 4:01 PM
4 moms liked this

She was extremely clear in her question. What is YOUR experience not interest. Don't get snarky because your reading comprehension is limited.

Quoting ripemango:

I was sharing my personal interest in the field because I thought you seemed interested. However, I guess I should have assumed snarkiness versus actual interest.

I never knew that some people disbelieve that one's chances of contracting an illness is increased by being in the hospital. I learn something new on CM all the time. 

An immunologist is a medical doctor specializing in the immune system that treats individual patients. Epidemiologists do not treat patients or deal with individuals. We deal with statistics, numbers, and groups of people. An immunologist is implementing current medical treatments whereas an epidemiologist is (hopefully) researching and coming up with new ones.

Best of luck w your child's condition.

Quoting 4ever-SJ:

That is your interest, not your experience.

I asked because of my experience as the parent of an immune-compromised child. I would presume you are knowledgeable of the work of Drs. Buckley and Markert at Duke? Yes/no? They are my son's immunologists and have never expressed a concern over the possibilities you posit.




Quoting ripemango:

Both

My interest is immunotherapy (specifically active immunotherapies) and the effectiveness on various forms of cancer (my focus is cervical). I would *like* to go into immunotherapy and study the effectiveness on other ailments as well. However, I may not get to do exactly what I want upon graduating. That may come with time! More than likely, I will get my internship at the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center but whether I'll get to be in on immunotherapies is still up in the air.


Quoting 4ever-SJ:

Do you have any first-hand experience or is your knowledge solely through education?





                                  

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4ever-SJ
by Gold Member on Jun. 17, 2012 at 4:16 PM
1 mom liked this
And, since you are neither an immunologist, nor an epidemiologist, I'll take my chances with the leading experts in the field and NOT a random, anonymous Cafemom poster.
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4ever-SJ
by Gold Member on Jun. 17, 2012 at 4:21 PM
2 moms liked this
Also, if you do continue on your educational path, let us hope that you opt for research rather than clinical epidemiology.

Your bedside manner leaves much to be desired.
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usmclife58
by Nikki on Jun. 17, 2012 at 6:14 PM

Regardless of what you do or who you are, the fact that you claim to be "in the know" and yet still tell a mom to "get the damn shots" when it would actually be harmful to the child (in this situation) discredits you. 

Quoting ripemango:

I was sharing my personal interest in the field because I thought you seemed interested. However, I guess I should have assumed snarkiness versus actual interest.

I never knew that some people disbelieve that one's chances of contracting an illness is increased by being in the hospital. I learn something new on CM all the time. 

An immunologist is a medical doctor specializing in the immune system that treats individual patients. Epidemiologists do not treat patients or deal with individuals. We deal with statistics, numbers, and groups of people. An immunologist is implementing current medical treatments whereas an epidemiologist is (hopefully) researching and coming up with new ones.

Best of luck w your child's condition.

Quoting 4ever-SJ:

That is your interest, not your experience.

I asked because of my experience as the parent of an immune-compromised child. I would presume you are knowledgeable of the work of Drs. Buckley and Markert at Duke? Yes/no? They are my son's immunologists and have never expressed a concern over the possibilities you posit.




Quoting ripemango:

Both

My interest is immunotherapy (specifically active immunotherapies) and the effectiveness on various forms of cancer (my focus is cervical). I would *like* to go into immunotherapy and study the effectiveness on other ailments as well. However, I may not get to do exactly what I want upon graduating. That may come with time! More than likely, I will get my internship at the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center but whether I'll get to be in on immunotherapies is still up in the air.


Quoting 4ever-SJ:

Do you have any first-hand experience or is your knowledge solely through education?





violinjewel
by Julia on Jun. 17, 2012 at 8:10 PM
You can't be forced to get those vaccines, even for a surgery. My limited knowledge on diseases and vaccines, would say not to get them before a surgery anyways.
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