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Military Families Military Families

Does Tri Care pay for...

Posted by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 1:56 PM
  • 13 Replies

service/alert dogs? My husband was recently diagnosed with T1 diabetes. They are in the beginning stages of the med board, and getting him a pump. I was wondering if they would pay for or at least help pay for a diabetic alert dog? I know that the pump will take his levels about every five minutes but I was wondering about a dog who would help alert him to lows at times when he's like sleeping or in loud situations where he might not hear the alert from the pump. We are hoping that since he has it under control for the most part that he will be able to stay in. 

by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 1:56 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Apollos82
by Cassie on Oct. 12, 2012 at 2:01 PM
I had no idea they "made" diabetic alert dogs. That's fascinating.

As tonic Tricare will pay for it, I've no idea. My guess is no, though.

Also, T1 diabetes is pretty much a no-go, as far as I know. I could be mistaken, and I'm sure someone else knows better, but that's my guess.
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AimBre
by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 2:10 PM


Quoting Apollos82:

I had no idea they "made" diabetic alert dogs. That's fascinating.

As tonic Tricare will pay for it, I've no idea. My guess is no, though.

Also, T1 diabetes is pretty much a no-go, as far as I know. I could be mistaken, and I'm sure someone else knows better, but that's my guess.

I guess dogs can smell the chemical inbalance of low sugar in a humans sweat, it is fascinating. 

His doctors at first gave no hope, unless he could pull it down from the 300s, to the 130 average, that puts him at a level 7 or lower (he was 10 when he first was diagnosed) he has made it to that range in a few short weeks. They say since he is extremely motivated and in control of this that they will reccomend that he stay in he just has to be sent to a nondeployable unit/mos. He'll have to always stay on Rear D and help from home. Or he could work in a combat hospital, since he would then obviously be close enough to insulin and emergency care. 

His current doctor even said with how it's going he would work towards a waiver to go officer as that's my husband's dream :) So as long as his med board doctors see it the same way (appts today for full body scan etc) then I'm sure he can stay in. 

Apollos82
by Cassie on Oct. 12, 2012 at 2:13 PM
That's awesome that your husband got it under control so quickly. I'm impressed. I hope they let him stay in, since it's his dream.

The dog might be worth the investment, even if Tricare doesn't help. Perhaps there are organizations that can help.


Quoting AimBre:


Quoting Apollos82:

I had no idea they "made" diabetic alert dogs. That's fascinating.



As tonic Tricare will pay for it, I've no idea. My guess is no, though.



Also, T1 diabetes is pretty much a no-go, as far as I know. I could be mistaken, and I'm sure someone else knows better, but that's my guess.

I guess dogs can smell the chemical inbalance of low sugar in a humans sweat, it is fascinating. 

His doctors at first gave no hope, unless he could pull it down from the 300s, to the 130 average, that puts him at a level 7 or lower (he was 10 when he first was diagnosed) he has made it to that range in a few short weeks. They say since he is extremely motivated and in control of this that they will reccomend that he stay in he just has to be sent to a nondeployable unit/mos. He'll have to always stay on Rear D and help from home. Or he could work in a combat hospital, since he would then obviously be close enough to insulin and emergency care. 

His current doctor even said with how it's going he would work towards a waiver to go officer as that's my husband's dream :) So as long as his med board doctors see it the same way (appts today for full body scan etc) then I'm sure he can stay in. 

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AimBre
by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 2:25 PM
1 mom liked this

He has impressed me to no end, I thought at first that this was going to be horrible. He wasn't going to do what he had to do to keep it under control, based on experience with older people with this disease. The first week we felt tossed to the wind, no one gave us any real information on what to eat and keep it down. 

Then we met with a diabetic educator, and she is AMAZING! She gave him scales, books about the disease and my husband's favorite is this book that has carb counts for everything including fast food. She told him he can eat anything he just has to take his quick acting insulin to cover it. So that made it easier and it's all been down hill from there. Fingers crossed and knock on wood it stays that way. 

My favorite though is this cool scale that weighs it and based on what it is (like a hot dog bun) it gives you calories, carbs, and like a full nutrition label for it. Which helps keep him from lows because one day we were going to go by the average on the bag for a hot dog bun it was like 6 carbs, he weighed it just to see, that bun was 12. He takes one unit of insulin for every 12 carbs so that could of made him spike high again. 

So tri-care has def helped a lot and I am pleasently surprised by just how much they have done. I guess pumps are upwards of $8,000. Tri care will cover all of it. 

Quoting Apollos82:

That's awesome that your husband got it under control so quickly. I'm impressed. I hope they let him stay in, since it's his dream.

The dog might be worth the investment, even if Tricare doesn't help. Perhaps there are organizations that can help.


Quoting AimBre:


Quoting Apollos82:

I had no idea they "made" diabetic alert dogs. That's fascinating.



As tonic Tricare will pay for it, I've no idea. My guess is no, though.



Also, T1 diabetes is pretty much a no-go, as far as I know. I could be mistaken, and I'm sure someone else knows better, but that's my guess.

I guess dogs can smell the chemical inbalance of low sugar in a humans sweat, it is fascinating. 

His doctors at first gave no hope, unless he could pull it down from the 300s, to the 130 average, that puts him at a level 7 or lower (he was 10 when he first was diagnosed) he has made it to that range in a few short weeks. They say since he is extremely motivated and in control of this that they will reccomend that he stay in he just has to be sent to a nondeployable unit/mos. He'll have to always stay on Rear D and help from home. Or he could work in a combat hospital, since he would then obviously be close enough to insulin and emergency care. 

His current doctor even said with how it's going he would work towards a waiver to go officer as that's my husband's dream :) So as long as his med board doctors see it the same way (appts today for full body scan etc) then I'm sure he can stay in. 


gunsgirl
by Silver Member on Oct. 13, 2012 at 8:16 AM

unfortunately no, they will not pay for it. and congrats that he is doing so well.

lacyleanne
by Member on Oct. 13, 2012 at 8:20 AM
I don't think they will but there are a ton of people in the military with diabetes. A med board is protocol so I wouldn't worry about it especially if he's doing well. :)
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SusanD
by Silver Member on Oct. 13, 2012 at 4:39 PM
No, tricare will not cover any portion if a service dog. There are charitable organizations that will help offset the cost. There is one organization that recently changed their name from D.A.D. (diabetic alert dog) to some other acronym but I'm sure that you can Google it and find them.

However be very cautious when it comes to service animals for this situation. Within the past few years There have been a few organizations that have been found to be frauds and putting out dogs that are not up to standards. A quality diabetic alert dog from a reputable trainer will set you back quite a bit. We've been looking into them and are finding that the average cost is 9-12k from a reputable breeder with their complete service animal certification.
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SusanD
by Silver Member on Oct. 13, 2012 at 4:45 PM
1 mom liked this
Tricare will cover the cost of a pump, with insurance they average around 5k for tethered pumping (with tubing) such as minimed, ping, etc. For tether free pumping the cost is set up very differently. The PDM is about 500 and the supplies run about 7-9k annually. However it is a state of the art pump. This would be the Omnipod pump

Tricare will cover 100% of the cost of the supplies and will pat for the pump or pdm once every 4 years. Every pump manufacturer has a 4 yr contract where they will service and replace the pump for general wear and tear within that 4 years. If the pump is dropped in water, smashed, lost, etc within that 4 year period, then replacement is your responsibility.


Quoting AimBre:

He has impressed me to no end, I thought at first that this was going to be horrible. He wasn't going to do what he had to do to keep it under control, based on experience with older people with this disease. The first week we felt tossed to the wind, no one gave us any real information on what to eat and keep it down. 

Then we met with a diabetic educator, and she is AMAZING! She gave him scales, books about the disease and my husband's favorite is this book that has carb counts for everything including fast food. She told him he can eat anything he just has to take his quick acting insulin to cover it. So that made it easier and it's all been down hill from there. Fingers crossed and knock on wood it stays that way. 

My favorite though is this cool scale that weighs it and based on what it is (like a hot dog bun) it gives you calories, carbs, and like a full nutrition label for it. Which helps keep him from lows because one day we were going to go by the average on the bag for a hot dog bun it was like 6 carbs, he weighed it just to see, that bun was 12. He takes one unit of insulin for every 12 carbs so that could of made him spike high again. 

So tri-care has def helped a lot and I am pleasently surprised by just how much they have done. I guess pumps are upwards of $8,000. Tri care will cover all of it. 

Quoting Apollos82:

That's awesome that your husband got it under control so quickly. I'm impressed. I hope they let him stay in, since it's his dream.



The dog might be worth the investment, even if Tricare doesn't help. Perhaps there are organizations that can help.




Quoting AimBre:


Quoting Apollos82:

I had no idea they "made" diabetic alert dogs. That's fascinating.





As tonic Tricare will pay for it, I've no idea. My guess is no, though.





Also, T1 diabetes is pretty much a no-go, as far as I know. I could be mistaken, and I'm sure someone else knows better, but that's my guess.

I guess dogs can smell the chemical inbalance of low sugar in a humans sweat, it is fascinating. 

His doctors at first gave no hope, unless he could pull it down from the 300s, to the 130 average, that puts him at a level 7 or lower (he was 10 when he first was diagnosed) he has made it to that range in a few short weeks. They say since he is extremely motivated and in control of this that they will reccomend that he stay in he just has to be sent to a nondeployable unit/mos. He'll have to always stay on Rear D and help from home. Or he could work in a combat hospital, since he would then obviously be close enough to insulin and emergency care. 

His current doctor even said with how it's going he would work towards a waiver to go officer as that's my husband's dream :) So as long as his med board doctors see it the same way (appts today for full body scan etc) then I'm sure he can stay in. 


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SusanD
by Silver Member on Oct. 13, 2012 at 4:47 PM
1 mom liked this
Also tricare does not cover the pump education class generally speaking. That typically runs about 250.00 that you will be responsible for though most endos will work with you on that and either adjust the cost some or allow you to pay that out.

Quoting SusanD:

Tricare will cover the cost of a pump, with insurance they average around 5k for tethered pumping (with tubing) such as minimed, ping, etc. For tether free pumping the cost is set up very differently. The PDM is about 500 and the supplies run about 7-9k annually. However it is a state of the art pump. This would be the Omnipod pump



Tricare will cover 100% of the cost of the supplies and will pat for the pump or pdm once every 4 years. Every pump manufacturer has a 4 yr contract where they will service and replace the pump for general wear and tear within that 4 years. If the pump is dropped in water, smashed, lost, etc within that 4 year period, then replacement is your responsibility.




Quoting AimBre:

He has impressed me to no end, I thought at first that this was going to be horrible. He wasn't going to do what he had to do to keep it under control, based on experience with older people with this disease. The first week we felt tossed to the wind, no one gave us any real information on what to eat and keep it down. 

Then we met with a diabetic educator, and she is AMAZING! She gave him scales, books about the disease and my husband's favorite is this book that has carb counts for everything including fast food. She told him he can eat anything he just has to take his quick acting insulin to cover it. So that made it easier and it's all been down hill from there. Fingers crossed and knock on wood it stays that way. 

My favorite though is this cool scale that weighs it and based on what it is (like a hot dog bun) it gives you calories, carbs, and like a full nutrition label for it. Which helps keep him from lows because one day we were going to go by the average on the bag for a hot dog bun it was like 6 carbs, he weighed it just to see, that bun was 12. He takes one unit of insulin for every 12 carbs so that could of made him spike high again. 

So tri-care has def helped a lot and I am pleasently surprised by just how much they have done. I guess pumps are upwards of $8,000. Tri care will cover all of it. 

Quoting Apollos82:

That's awesome that your husband got it under control so quickly. I'm impressed. I hope they let him stay in, since it's his dream.





The dog might be worth the investment, even if Tricare doesn't help. Perhaps there are organizations that can help.






Quoting AimBre:


Quoting Apollos82:

I had no idea they "made" diabetic alert dogs. That's fascinating.







As tonic Tricare will pay for it, I've no idea. My guess is no, though.







Also, T1 diabetes is pretty much a no-go, as far as I know. I could be mistaken, and I'm sure someone else knows better, but that's my guess.

I guess dogs can smell the chemical inbalance of low sugar in a humans sweat, it is fascinating. 

His doctors at first gave no hope, unless he could pull it down from the 300s, to the 130 average, that puts him at a level 7 or lower (he was 10 when he first was diagnosed) he has made it to that range in a few short weeks. They say since he is extremely motivated and in control of this that they will reccomend that he stay in he just has to be sent to a nondeployable unit/mos. He'll have to always stay on Rear D and help from home. Or he could work in a combat hospital, since he would then obviously be close enough to insulin and emergency care. 

His current doctor even said with how it's going he would work towards a waiver to go officer as that's my husband's dream :) So as long as his med board doctors see it the same way (appts today for full body scan etc) then I'm sure he can stay in. 


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
AimBre
by on Oct. 15, 2012 at 3:08 AM


Quoting SusanD:

No, tricare will not cover any portion if a service dog. There are charitable organizations that will help offset the cost. There is one organization that recently changed their name from D.A.D. (diabetic alert dog) to some other acronym but I'm sure that you can Google it and find them.

However be very cautious when it comes to service animals for this situation. Within the past few years There have been a few organizations that have been found to be frauds and putting out dogs that are not up to standards. A quality diabetic alert dog from a reputable trainer will set you back quite a bit. We've been looking into them and are finding that the average cost is 9-12k from a reputable breeder with their complete service animal certification.

Yea I've been realizing that as I search. I have heard a little about training dogs you already have, and then today I saw a post on my bases' pet page about the marine corps rehoming some working dogs, I wonder if one of them could be trained as an alert dog, or if their previous training as a IED detection dog would hinder it. 

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