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The VA loan question got me thinking. How do you choose your realtor and lender? We are looking into buying a home (our first) and I'm talking to a realtor that came recommended by a friend, but I'm not sure it's a good fit. We won't be in the area for another few months, so I understand we might not be high on her list of priorities, I just expected a bit more effort than I've seen so far.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 12:41 AM
Replies (11-20):
SlapItHigh
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:35 AM
My realtor was my Grandma all 3 times we bought houses. Having a top agent as a family member is really nice! She has a great lender so we went with him although we made sure to shop around a little just to be sure. The last house we sold almost fell through because of our buyer's lender but my Grandma got our buyer hooked up with her lender and he was able to get her loan to go through when the other lender wasn't. Phew!
Katkinson
by Kristin on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:53 AM

If you have kids, pick a Realtor with kids.  Schools were a #1 priority for us.  Ours also happened to be an ex-teacher!  She knew the "good" areas for families and the "shady" areas for families.  Some houses we looked at were super nice and well within our price range and although the immediate neighborhood was decent, the outlying ones: not so much. 

We moved from GA to NY though so we had NO IDEA as to what was a good area and what was not. 

 

gunsgirl
by Silver Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:17 AM

 

what your realtor did is highly unethical and illegal. a realtor is never allowed to steer a client to or from areas, only give information to the client on how to find out that information.

a realtor cannot ever say-" this area has the best schools".

she can say "according to a 2008 report by great schools.com this is "reported" to be the best school"

.


 

Quoting Katkinson:

If you have kids, pick a Realtor with kids.  Schools were a #1 priority for us.  Ours also happened to be an ex-teacher!  She knew the "good" areas for families and the "shady" areas for families.  Some houses we looked at were super nice and well within our price range and although the immediate neighborhood was decent, the outlying ones: not so much. 

We moved from GA to NY though so we had NO IDEA as to what was a good area and what was not. 

 


 

Katkinson
by Kristin on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:21 AM

 I fail to see how it is unethical. 

I'd be pissed if she sold us a house in a crappy neighborhood. 

Why is it illegal for a Realtor to tell you about a school when that information is widely available online???

All i know is she was a life saver, because otherwise we would have bought a BEAUTIFUL home smack in the middle of one of the most crime-ridden cities in upstate NY. 

It may have been "against her rules" but she did the right thing.  We knew nothing about the area and no one that lived here.  You seriously think she should have kept her mouth shut about information she knows because she's local???  I don't. 

What is unethical is a Realtor not disclosing information that we had specifically told her would govern which house we purchased.  If she had kept her mouth shut about it, that would have been incredibly dishonest, especially when we had clearly communicated to her what our priorities were. 

This was SUCH a priority for us, we turned down a completely remodeled home for LESS MONEY and chose a home with the ideal neighborhood/schools/area that completely needed to be remodeled. 

 

Quoting gunsgirl:

 

what your realtor did is highly unethical and illegal. a realtor is never allowed to steer a client to or from areas, only give information to the client on how to find out that information.

a realtor cannot ever say-" this area has the best schools".

she can say "according to a 2008 report by great schools.com this is "reported" to be the best school"

.


 

Quoting Katkinson:

If you have kids, pick a Realtor with kids.  Schools were a #1 priority for us.  Ours also happened to be an ex-teacher!  She knew the "good" areas for families and the "shady" areas for families.  Some houses we looked at were super nice and well within our price range and although the immediate neighborhood was decent, the outlying ones: not so much. 

We moved from GA to NY though so we had NO IDEA as to what was a good area and what was not. 

 

 

 

 

 

SierraLynn
by Just Me on Sep. 16, 2013 at 10:21 AM
We are looking into buying after my husband gets home. We are going to use our property manager for the house we are renting as our realtor. I've gotten to know him better and he is a good guy and seems to genuinely want to help us. He isnt flooding us with listings and phone calls because he knows my husband wants to be a here first. But he knows our desired area to live. Just not our price range. We need to talk to a lender first to see what we can afford.
It does seem like the nicer houses in this area are very expensive. If we can't find something suitable and livable for a decent price then we won't be buying here.
Jagosto
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 10:36 AM
2 moms liked this

If it doesnt feel right then just switch. You should never settle.

gunsgirl
by Silver Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 12:00 PM

 it is called Steering and it s a fair housing law, all classes are included in the law, race, religeon ect. It also include giving information about a neighborhood that can be associated with that Classification including schools,

We as Agents can tell customers that the schools in this area are rated the best in the county ACCORDING to great schools.org, but we cannot say, this area has the best schools.

we can say according to the . city police's recent report this neighborhood has the fewest crime calls, but we cannot say, this area has low crime.

there is a fine line between right and wrong in real estate and it only takes on buyer to complain to the commssion that the agent "steered" them for the agent to lose her license.

in the age of technology and the availabile of information it is not our job to help the buyers find the best neighborhood,,, only to find them the best house, buyers MUST do thier due dilegence to find their own neighborhoods, schools, churches, ect.


Quoting Katkinson:

 I fail to see how it is unethical. 

I'd be pissed if she sold us a house in a crappy neighborhood. 

Why is it illegal for a Realtor to tell you about a school when that information is widely available online???

All i know is she was a life saver, because otherwise we would have bought a BEAUTIFUL home smack in the middle of one of the most crime-ridden cities in upstate NY. 

It may have been "against her rules" but she did the right thing.  We knew nothing about the area and no one that lived here.  You seriously think she should have kept her mouth shut about information she knows because she's local???  I don't. 

What is unethical is a Realtor not disclosing information that we had specifically told her would govern which house we purchased.  If she had kept her mouth shut about it, that would have been incredibly dishonest, especially when we had clearly communicated to her what our priorities were. 

This was SUCH a priority for us, we turned down a completely remodeled home for LESS MONEY and chose a home with the ideal neighborhood/schools/area that completely needed to be remodeled. 

 

Quoting gunsgirl:

 

what your realtor did is highly unethical and illegal. a realtor is never allowed to steer a client to or from areas, only give information to the client on how to find out that information.

a realtor cannot ever say-" this area has the best schools".

she can say "according to a 2008 report by great schools.com this is "reported" to be the best school"

.


 

Quoting Katkinson:

If you have kids, pick a Realtor with kids.  Schools were a #1 priority for us.  Ours also happened to be an ex-teacher!  She knew the "good" areas for families and the "shady" areas for families.  Some houses we looked at were super nice and well within our price range and although the immediate neighborhood was decent, the outlying ones: not so much. 

We moved from GA to NY though so we had NO IDEA as to what was a good area and what was not. 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Katkinson
by Kristin on Sep. 16, 2013 at 1:24 PM

 

holy spell-check. . .

She did not "steer" us in any direction, we asked.  Also, the protected individual groups under the Fair Housing Act were not a concern of ours.  Criminals were.   Our neighborhood is actually quite diverse.  It was also our family priority that the kids get a stellar education.  It's my right to keep my children safe and to live free of the fear of being a victim of a criminal act.  What kind of realtor would sell someone a home where they could not feel safe and secure? ESPECIALLY with my husband being gone as much as he is. 

if you ask me, THAT is the real unethical act. 

Quoting gunsgirl:

 it is called Steering and it s a fair housing law, all classes are included in the law, race, religeon ect. It also include giving information about a neighborhood that can be associated with that Classification including schools,

We as Agents can tell customers that the schools in this area are rated the best in the county ACCORDING to great schools.org, but we cannot say, this area has the best schools.

we can say according to the . city police's recent report this neighborhood has the fewest crime calls, but we cannot say, this area has low crime.

there is a fine line between right and wrong in real estate and it only takes on buyer to complain to the commssion that the agent "steered" them for the agent to lose her license.

in the age of technology and the availabile of information it is not our job to help the buyers find the best neighborhood,,, only to find them the best house, buyers MUST do thier due dilegence to find their own neighborhoods, schools, churches, ect.

 

Quoting Katkinson:

 I fail to see how it is unethical. 

I'd be pissed if she sold us a house in a crappy neighborhood. 

Why is it illegal for a Realtor to tell you about a school when that information is widely available online???

All i know is she was a life saver, because otherwise we would have bought a BEAUTIFUL home smack in the middle of one of the most crime-ridden cities in upstate NY. 

It may have been "against her rules" but she did the right thing.  We knew nothing about the area and no one that lived here.  You seriously think she should have kept her mouth shut about information she knows because she's local???  I don't. 

What is unethical is a Realtor not disclosing information that we had specifically told her would govern which house we purchased.  If she had kept her mouth shut about it, that would have been incredibly dishonest, especially when we had clearly communicated to her what our priorities were. 

This was SUCH a priority for us, we turned down a completely remodeled home for LESS MONEY and chose a home with the ideal neighborhood/schools/area that completely needed to be remodeled. 

 

Quoting gunsgirl:

 

what your realtor did is highly unethical and illegal. a realtor is never allowed to steer a client to or from areas, only give information to the client on how to find out that information.

a realtor cannot ever say-" this area has the best schools".

she can say "according to a 2008 report by great schools.com this is "reported" to be the best school"

.


 

Quoting Katkinson:

If you have kids, pick a Realtor with kids.  Schools were a #1 priority for us.  Ours also happened to be an ex-teacher!  She knew the "good" areas for families and the "shady" areas for families.  Some houses we looked at were super nice and well within our price range and although the immediate neighborhood was decent, the outlying ones: not so much. 

We moved from GA to NY though so we had NO IDEA as to what was a good area and what was not. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mlogsdon
by Mary on Sep. 16, 2013 at 3:01 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting USAFamily:

Hiring a realtor is just like hiring anyone to do a job for you. Get one recommended to you, google them, and have a sit down interview with them to see if you mesh.

Lenders are all the same- the only difference are the fees they charge at closing. Compare origination fees, application fees, and points associated with the loan and interest rate you want. Do this with multiple lenders. The can give you a 'good faith estimate' for free that will list those fees. Whoever comes out cheapest, go with them.

Thank you! Ive been nervous about contacting lenders because I don't know what all the terms mean, and have no way of knowing what is good and whats not. If it was based on sales commission, they would make everything sound good lol. You give me a good place to start learning though :) 

mlogsdon
by Mary on Sep. 16, 2013 at 3:02 PM


Quoting MrsSexyCurtains:

I found my realtor by chance. I left a voicemail about a few houses and she called me back. I liked her the minute I heard her voice.

We found and signed our house in less than two months. Hubby was in Cuba on IA orders for a year, so as a first time buyer I was confused on a lot of things. She helped me understand the loan docs usaa sent and was always there to answer my questions. We used his VA loan to buy the house. After we closed on the house she invited me and dd over for Easter brunch.

She's now our property manager and I'll never buy another house without her. Even if I'm in another state, I'll still go with her first.

That's great! Since we are starting our search before we get to the area, I really want it to be someone I trust and connect with. Its awesome that you found someone like that. 

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