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This makes me sick. As a parent of a disabled child who will remain disabled well into his adult life, the fact that these residents are fighting with the Commissioner to not have group homes built in their neighborhood is just disgusting. These group homes are for adults with physical and mental disabilities. Living in a group home will give these people a chance at living in a home instead of a hospital. These homes will be run by professional companies that have millions of government regulations they HAVE to abide by; these homes will also be staffed with full-time nurses as many of these patients have trachs, feeding tubes, & severe disabilities. These York County residents should be ashamed of their behavior. Instead of fighting this, they should spend a little of their time volunteering at group homes like this so they can get a new perspective on life.


Residents fight proposed group home

WAVY/Andy Fox
WAVY/Andy Fox

YORK COUNTY, Va. (WAVY) - Not in my backyard -- that's what people in York County are saying about a group home planned for their neighborhood. Wednesday night residents fought against the facility at a public hearing.

You can see the sign at the front of the Lackey neighborhood: “Help fight the 3 mental facilities planned for this neighborhood.”

The controversy surrounds Colonial Behavioral Health’s proposal to build three group homes for 12 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the Lackey neighborhood, off Old Williamsburg Road.

The homes would replace CBH's current group home program that uses leased apartments in York County. Part of the reason for the change is because David Coe with CBH says it's important for the special needs adults to have their own bedrooms and back yards.

But local residents don't want to share their backyards. Dozens of people signed up to speak about the issue in front of elected officials at a public hearing Wednesday night at York Hall on Main Street.

Some residents voiced concern because they feel as if they haven't had a say in this process. Others feel as if the homes could bring dangerous people -- such as those suffering from schizophrenia, bi polar disorder, or substance abuse -- near the place they live. And some say the group homes will bring down property values.

Coe says law won't allow people with substance abuse problems to move into the group homes

The hearing began at 7 p.m. and lasted more than three hours. Border commissioners asked CBH to consider building two homes instead of three, but Coe would not compromise.

"It's all three or none," he said at the hearing.

Despite Coe's resistance, the Planning Commission voted three to one to recommend a two-group-home proposal instead of three group homes. The final decision has not yet been made -- the recommendation will go before the Board of Supervisors, who will put an end to the dispute.


by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 6:41 PM
Replies (41-50):
darbyakeep45
by Darby on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:42 PM

Let me also add that I just read more about the company who is building these group homes.  They met with the Commissioner of the county/town and spoke more about the kinds of people who will live in these homes.  They are in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, oxygen, severe disabilities including not being able to talk or walk.  The commissioner clearly stated that there will be NO patients with sexual history or violent history living in these homes.

luckystars2012
by Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:53 PM
I don't know for sure(never said I did) but my past experience warns against it. Time is the best teacher.

I'm sorry for your child, and no I wpuldnt judge your child based on his appearance alone. And as I already said, I have no issue with actual family homes where. Parents care for their disabled adult child.

It's not the same as a group home though. Not even close.


Quoting darbyakeep45:

How do you know there will be problems with a group home in your neighborhood?  That's it...you don't know!  You can't tell the future and you're basing everything on ONE group home.  For goodness sake lady!  You're a piece of work!

The group home this article is referring to has patients who are nonambulatory and not able to even talk for goodness sake.  These people are not harmful to others.  They can't even walk for crying out loud.  

I'm done arguing with you over this.  I have a severely disabled child with a terminal illness.  I surely would never want him to be in a group home anywhere near you.  You would take one look at him and immediately judge him because of someone you saw years ago that did something inappropriate.  

Good night:) 

Quoting luckystars2012:

That's like saying I should be okay with sex offenders moving in next door because I have no way of knowing if they will do something bad.



Why invite problems?



In my experience, a disabled adult living with their parents (like my cousin) generally gets a lot more supervision than people in a group Home. I'd be fine with a disabled adult living with their parents next door to me.



Not a group home where there are limited resources for supervision and mire gets swept under the rug for the sake of being politically correct.









Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.





"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.








Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.







"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".







Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?











Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.









The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.














Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.





















Caera
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:55 PM


LOL!

Here's that straw you were reaching for!

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Thank you for proving my point of "shit happens" regardless of where you live.  There aren't any guarantees in life period.  

Besides, the group homes this article is talking about are for SEVERELY DISABLED people who are in wheelchairs, not able to talk much, many can't eat by mouth, and so on.  They aren't of any harm to anyone around them.  

Quoting opal10161973:

I've had more issues with my old neighbor, who was consistently disabled by alcohol.  They found him dead on his front lanai earlier this year, apparently of a heroin overdose, and it is a suspected homicide by the people he was allowing to stay there.  MUCH worse than any group home, IMO. 

We live in a nice area, too. 

Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.

"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.


Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.



"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".



Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?





Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.





The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.








Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.














luckystars2012
by Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:58 PM
This home was one where most of the residents came and went, somewhat as they pleased. Some had jobs at fast food places, etc. They were taught to be independent. Which is great. Except it wasn't thought strange for them to be out alone, so there was plenty of time for "things to happen".

I don't blame the residents. I do blame the workers and owners of the Home. But that doesn't mean I would want one of those homes in our neighborhood.


Quoting opal10161973:

Not all companies that own the homes are like that.  In the one I mentioned, there were two people taking care of 6 adults.  That's a pretty small ratio and they never lost one of their people or had any issues that were nearly as bad as what you are describing.  Some of them were able to walk and considered higher functioning, too.  That was just terribly poor managed.  I'm sorry for your family and those people.  All of you deserved better. 

Quoting luckystars2012:

That's like saying I should be okay with sex offenders moving in next door because I have no way of knowing if they will do something bad.



Why invite problems?



In my experience, a disabled adult living with their parents (like my cousin) generally gets a lot more supervision than people in a group Home. I'd be fine with a disabled adult living with their parents next door to me.



Not a group home where there are limited resources for supervision and mire gets swept under the rug for the sake of being politically correct.









Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.





"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.








Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.







"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".







Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?











Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.









The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.














Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.





















Mrs.Brugger
by Tiara on Sep. 16, 2013 at 8:59 PM
1 mom liked this

I'm...astounded. Because a group home being built in their neighborhood means horrible people will come into their personal homes and yards and trash them and hurt them and directly bother them? Ummm. No. Especially since a lot of these people need full time nurses/care. How are they going to "get out" and harm others? They're not. They're going to stay in their homes, in their yards, and as long as the neighborhood residents leave them alone, they will leave the residents alone. Boom. Done. 

How very sad. =[

opal10161973
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:02 PM
1 mom liked this

People fear what they don't understand.  Dummies.

Quoting darbyakeep45:

Thank you for proving my point of "shit happens" regardless of where you live.  There aren't any guarantees in life period.  

Besides, the group homes this article is talking about are for SEVERELY DISABLED people who are in wheelchairs, not able to talk much, many can't eat by mouth, and so on.  They aren't of any harm to anyone around them.  

Quoting opal10161973:

I've had more issues with my old neighbor, who was consistently disabled by alcohol.  They found him dead on his front lanai earlier this year, apparently of a heroin overdose, and it is a suspected homicide by the people he was allowing to stay there.  MUCH worse than any group home, IMO. 

We live in a nice area, too. 

Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.

"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.


Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.



"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".



Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?





Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.





The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.








Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.














mlogsdon
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:06 PM
1 mom liked this
When I worked in a group home, the company leased the location. There were eventually enough people throwing a fit that we did have relocate. It was obnoxious, and there was never any trouble.

But I'm curious.... What's the difference between a family neighborhood and a regular neighborhood, where it would apparently be ok to have these group homes?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
opal10161973
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:09 PM
1 mom liked this

I think the point that Luckystars is trying to make is that the home in this article is nothing like the one you described.  Those people would not be doing anything like that because they wouldn't be ABLE to.  For that type of home, those problems would not exist.  Would you still object under those circumstances? 

Quoting luckystars2012:

This home was one where most of the residents came and went, somewhat as they pleased. Some had jobs at fast food places, etc. They were taught to be independent. Which is great. Except it wasn't thought strange for them to be out alone, so there was plenty of time for "things to happen".

I don't blame the residents. I do blame the workers and owners of the Home. But that doesn't mean I would want one of those homes in our neighborhood.


Quoting opal10161973:

Not all companies that own the homes are like that.  In the one I mentioned, there were two people taking care of 6 adults.  That's a pretty small ratio and they never lost one of their people or had any issues that were nearly as bad as what you are describing.  Some of them were able to walk and considered higher functioning, too.  That was just terribly poor managed.  I'm sorry for your family and those people.  All of you deserved better. 

Quoting luckystars2012:

That's like saying I should be okay with sex offenders moving in next door because I have no way of knowing if they will do something bad.



Why invite problems?



In my experience, a disabled adult living with their parents (like my cousin) generally gets a lot more supervision than people in a group Home. I'd be fine with a disabled adult living with their parents next door to me.



Not a group home where there are limited resources for supervision and mire gets swept under the rug for the sake of being politically correct.









Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.





"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.








Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.







"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".







Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?











Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.









The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.














Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.






















luckystars2012
by Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:21 PM
My issue would be this....those residents won't live in the home forever. Group homes constantly change residents as the occupants pass or their needs change or insurance doesn't cover them to live there any more. So who regulates who moves in next? Are they guaranteeing that this home will only ever be for hoembound adults? If the owners ever wanted to change that in the future, how easy would it be?


Quoting opal10161973:

I think the point that Luckystars is trying to make is that the home in this article is nothing like the one you described.  Those people would not be doing anything like that because they wouldn't be ABLE to.  For that type of home, those problems would not exist.  Would you still object under those circumstances? 

Quoting luckystars2012:

This home was one where most of the residents came and went, somewhat as they pleased. Some had jobs at fast food places, etc. They were taught to be independent. Which is great. Except it wasn't thought strange for them to be out alone, so there was plenty of time for "things to happen".



I don't blame the residents. I do blame the workers and owners of the Home. But that doesn't mean I would want one of those homes in our neighborhood.





Quoting opal10161973:

Not all companies that own the homes are like that.  In the one I mentioned, there were two people taking care of 6 adults.  That's a pretty small ratio and they never lost one of their people or had any issues that were nearly as bad as what you are describing.  Some of them were able to walk and considered higher functioning, too.  That was just terribly poor managed.  I'm sorry for your family and those people.  All of you deserved better. 

Quoting luckystars2012:

That's like saying I should be okay with sex offenders moving in next door because I have no way of knowing if they will do something bad.





Why invite problems?





In my experience, a disabled adult living with their parents (like my cousin) generally gets a lot more supervision than people in a group Home. I'd be fine with a disabled adult living with their parents next door to me.





Not a group home where there are limited resources for supervision and mire gets swept under the rug for the sake of being politically correct.














Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.







"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.











Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.









"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".









Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?














Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.











The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.

















Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.




























opal10161973
by on Sep. 16, 2013 at 9:38 PM
1 mom liked this

Down here it's regulated for certain needs.  So, you wouldn't see higher needs in the same home with lower needs.  It is evaluated quarterly by the Dr and a team of therapists and caregivers.  The group home I referred to rarely had any changes as most of the people who lived there were younger, with multiple health issues.  It is not as well regulated everywhere though, so I understand your hesitation.  Also, it was paid for not by individual insurance, it was Medicaid and disability mostly.  It is not easy to change the status of a home either.  If that were to happen, everyone currently living there would need to find other placement, which would be the responsibility of the home.  It's a lot of work with likely the exact same payout.  So, it would cost more money to change the status, than it would be worth.

Quoting luckystars2012:

My issue would be this....those residents won't live in the home forever. Group homes constantly change residents as the occupants pass or their needs change or insurance doesn't cover them to live there any more. So who regulates who moves in next? Are they guaranteeing that this home will only ever be for hoembound adults? If the owners ever wanted to change that in the future, how easy would it be?


Quoting opal10161973:

I think the point that Luckystars is trying to make is that the home in this article is nothing like the one you described.  Those people would not be doing anything like that because they wouldn't be ABLE to.  For that type of home, those problems would not exist.  Would you still object under those circumstances? 

Quoting luckystars2012:

This home was one where most of the residents came and went, somewhat as they pleased. Some had jobs at fast food places, etc. They were taught to be independent. Which is great. Except it wasn't thought strange for them to be out alone, so there was plenty of time for "things to happen".



I don't blame the residents. I do blame the workers and owners of the Home. But that doesn't mean I would want one of those homes in our neighborhood.





Quoting opal10161973:

Not all companies that own the homes are like that.  In the one I mentioned, there were two people taking care of 6 adults.  That's a pretty small ratio and they never lost one of their people or had any issues that were nearly as bad as what you are describing.  Some of them were able to walk and considered higher functioning, too.  That was just terribly poor managed.  I'm sorry for your family and those people.  All of you deserved better. 

Quoting luckystars2012:

That's like saying I should be okay with sex offenders moving in next door because I have no way of knowing if they will do something bad.





Why invite problems?





In my experience, a disabled adult living with their parents (like my cousin) generally gets a lot more supervision than people in a group Home. I'd be fine with a disabled adult living with their parents next door to me.





Not a group home where there are limited resources for supervision and mire gets swept under the rug for the sake of being politically correct.














Quoting darbyakeep45:

There are no guarantees in life.  You can't guarantee that your current neighbors won't come out one day doing something like this.  There are sick and crazy people in the world!  You are basing things off ONE group home.  That is just ridiculous as not all group homes are like that.  I'm sorry but "things will happen" in every single neighborhood regardless of whether there are group homes or special needs people living it.  You never know...you could have a neighbor who's a disabled adult male living with his parents and something happens (oops) and he is left unsupervised and he goes outside and shows himself to the neighborhood children.  Yes, things happen and you can't control it.  Get over it.  You can't guarantee you will have great neighbors your whole life even if they are "family" people.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

I didn't say I knew everything, I said based on my past experience I wouldn't want one in my neighborhood. Just like there a certain areas I wouldn't live in, etc.







"Things will happen" is simply not good enough.











Quoting darbyakeep45:

See my last comment to you on this.  It's not the fault of the disabled adult...it's the fault of the staff running the place!  I never said that nothing should be done about it...of course it should be handled appropriately! I'm saying that life is NOT perfect.  Period.  There will always be crap that happens with ANY AND ALL neighbors.  No matter who they are!  Just because you heard of one bad group home doesn't mean they are all like that either.  You have such a horrible attitude and let one bad group home sway your opinion about group homes.  I've had horrible neighbors before...I don't go around thinking that every single neighbor I ever have with x amount of kids with x amount of things and such will be bad.  Geez.

Quoting luckystars2012:

Not in a family community/ subdivision.









"Things will happen" doesn't really cut it when someone is showing their penis to children or breaking car windows in the neighborhood. If it were an in handicapped adult doing those things it would be an outrage and they would go to jail. Nobody would be saying "things will happen".









Imagine if a man was going up to your young daughter and showing her his penis, stroking it and smiling at her, and someone said "we'll, no system is perfect, things will happen" and nothing was really done because he was special needs?














Quoting darbyakeep45:

I definitely don't agree with letting the people outside without supervision...that's how things happen like what you are referring to.  When these group homes are built and people are moved into them, they have to be fully staffed to ensure things like that don't happen.  Unfortunately, no system is perfect and things will happen.  

If a group home for severly disabled people (like the one in the article) shouldn't be in a neighborhood, then where should it be?  In the middle of nowhere in the woods away from all other human beings?  

Quoting luckystars2012:

The one in my aunts neighborhood was for "differently abled adults". There were I think ten people in the home plus the nurses and such. There were a couple that were wheelchair bound and unable to feed themselves and whatnot but most were "independent". Things like autism and such. Which is fine. I have an autistic cousin and I agree that they deserve a home too. But with the problems that I've seen, a special needs home doesn't belong in a family community.











The worst part was that everything was brushed under the rug because they were "special", I cluding the guy who showed he penis.

















Quoting darbyakeep45:

I think there are different kinds of group homes....you may be referring to a different one than this article is speaking about.

I saw the news coverage about these homes.  They showed the patients and people who would be living in these homes.  They are severly disabled...in wheelchairs, with trachs, feeding tubes, and such.  These people can't even walk much less do what you are speaking about below.  These people are human beings too....they deserve to be well cared for.  

Quoting luckystars2012:

My aunt lived near one of those group homes and there was all kinds of trouble. One "differently abled" man who was going round showing his penis to children , a woman who stole mail, another who yelled at anyone who made eye contact as he walked down the street. I remember one young man with autism having some kind of meltdown in the street because he missed the ice cream truck, and broke a car window. i would fight this too.





























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