WW II veteran John PotterWorld War II veteran who came perilously close to losing the home he'd lived in for 56 years doesn't have to worry about eviction ever again. John Potter is 92, and when his owndaughter tried to evict himearlier this year, the veteran turned to his granddaughter for help to save his home. Her answer? She videotaped her grandpa telling old war stories, and hoped everyday Americans would be inspired enough to help a true hero out.

Getting a little weepy? It gets better! It worked! America came through!

Thanks to the donations of strangers who were moved by the elderly veteran's stories, Potter's granddaughter, 35-year-old Jaclyn Fraley, has saved grandpa from eviction. She not only raised enough money to buy back the house from Potter's daughter (and evil landlord), Janice Cottrill, who had gotten power of attorney from her parents back in 2004 and used it to transfer dear old dad's house into her name, but she raised enough to help pay for this war hero's care!

Happy dance!

This is the America I love, the America where people step up to help one another, the America where we recognize that guys like John Potter did something valuable for our country, and they shouldn't be put in situations like this.

All too often we see it though, don't we? Maybe not this exact situation -- thank goodness there aren't that many daughters out there just itching to evict their 92-year-old fathers -- butveterans whose service is long past, who have run into trouble and who have nowhere to turn.

When people step in to help guys like John Potter, it reaffirms my faith in an America where people who say they are patriots aren't just giving lip service to our country. It's not enough, quite frankly, to fly a flag in your front yard and say you're a proud American. You have to live it, and part of that is remembering those who have done so much for us so that we can live as we do.

It means when you hear of a plight like John Potter's, you remember the good turn he gave our country and give one back. You let these guys know we haven't forgotten them.

And by the way: John Potter recognizes what people are doing for him. Here's one of his videos made as the contributions were pouring in:

Do you know an aging veteran?

When you see a veteran, do you make sure they know their service is appreciated even today?